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November 22, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-22

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P.AGIR". -wo,

TOTE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEITBER 22, 1966

PAGE TWO TIlE MICIIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1966

MUSIC
New York's 'Tosca' Capitalizes
On Theatre, Characterization

To Die in Madrid':
A Spanish Tragedy

Phone 482-2056
Entaasre OCARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 5: 30 P M.-FREE HEATERS
NOW SHOWI NG

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, November 22, 1 :00 Noon
U.M. INTERNATIONAL CENTER
SUBJECT:
Possible Roles for New Zealand
In Southeast Asia
SPEAKER: DR. H. PRAMWELL COOK (New Zealand)
Clinical Research, University Medical Center

By R. A. PERRY'
Julius Rudel, director and con-
ductor of the New York City Opera
Company, is as shrewd an entre-
preneur as he .is an outstanding
musician. Knowing that he does
not have the great singers (they
sing to the rich at the Met). Rudel

stresses the theatre in his opera
productions. Thus the crowd which
converged on Hill Aud. this past
Sunday to hear Puccini's "'Iosca,"
saw true Italian "verismo," lessen-
ed only by the skimpy sets and
minimal extras 'that a road show
necessitates. Scrapia threw wine

ITALIAN MA STERPIECES:
CRIA Asks Funds
To Restore Lost Art

By LISSA MATROSS C
The Ann Arbor branch of the
national Committee for Rescuing
Italian Art (CRIA) has issued "an
urgent call for help" in its effort
to collect funds for the restora-
tion of works of art damaged in
recent floods in Italy.
Prof. Marvin Eisenberg, chair-
man of the history of art depart-
ment and head of the committee,
reports that contributions, includ-
ing $1,000 donated by the Univer-
sity, have been coming in steadily,
The severe flooding of the Arno
and Po rivers crippled Italy and
put the country in severe eco-
nomic straits. Hundreds of small
shops in Florence were completely
destroyed by the flood waters.
1200 Paintings
The more than 1,200 paintings
destroyed include "The Crucifix-
ion" by Giovanni Cimabue, a por-
trait of Michelangelo by Bugiar-.
dini, "Last Supper" by Vasari, "St..
Julian and the Holy Trinity" by
Andres del Castango, and Giotto's
"The Wedding of St. Catherine."

Severe damage was also done to
the Ponte Vecchio in Florence
and to the archives in the Con-
servatorio Museum, including sev-
eral original musical scores of
Alessandro Scarlatti.
CRIA was formed by professors
at Brown University. Its national
headquarters is at New York Uni-
versity's Institute of Fine Arts.
Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy is hon-
orary chairman of the committee.
Advisory Committee
Distribution of funds rests with
an advisory committee headed by
Millard Meiss, art historian at the
Institute of Advanced Study at
Princeton.
Mrs. Henry Ford II is head of
the Detroit regional committee
which is organizing a state-wide
appeal.
Experts ;estimate that it will
take at least 20 years to complete
the restoration. The restoration of
one painting done on ,wood may
take as long as two years .with
two men working full-time on the
work.

into the face of his lacky, Cavara-
dossi writhed from his torture,
and Tosca sang "Vissi d'arte" flat
on her stomach. It was a good
show.
Perhaps it seems odd to begin
the estimation of the cast with
Scarpia, but considering Rudel's
conception of "Tosca," it is appro-
priate to first praise Sherrill Mil-
ner. Granted to lacks the reson-
ance and warmth of a London or
Warren, and is perfectly willing
to break the line of the music with
marked inflections of pleading or
sneering, he can create and main-
tain dramatic credibility. Indeed,
he was so real as to be nearly
sympathetic, and I' hated to see
him done in by a cardboard Tosca.
Jeannine Crader Nang Tosca,
and one could not blame Scarpia,
after, ally fore leching after this
lovely, bosomy creature. She had
no trouble in the higher registers,
buc her lower range verged on the
husky. Miss Crader has a warm,
sti ong voice but one which is not
always round and well-defined.
Although the tenor role of Cay-
ardossi is an idotic one-his per-
sonality is non-existent -Puccini
gave him arias of heroic tone
sufficient to substantiate his pos-
turing. (I once saw Corelli, hold-
ing high A, stride from stsge left
to far right and then back again!)
As this courageous but doomed
artist-lover, Placido Domingo sang
superbly in a pure, round, and
strong voice that held that admir-
able quality of suggesting an un-
tapped reserve. He was the only
one of the lead trio that did not
break the line for the drama, and
did not suffer from lack of the
latter.
A most rare and happy facet of
the afternoon's presentation was
the plendid orchestral playing un-
der the meticulous hand of Rudel
himself. Oddly enough, the accous-
tic perversities of Hill Aud.
brought out even more clearly
(from where I sat) the most min-
ute details of orchestration, d'e-
tails you seldom hear from the
Met pit.
A minor complaint: the first act
staging was incredibly inept. The
entire center stage was filled with
uninvolved props which forced the
action into a thin upstage strip of
s p a c e, producing unnecessary
tedium.

By RICHARD AYERS
and ANDREW LUGG
"Passion" is an often-touted
characteristic of the Spanish peo-
ple. This, which they call "du-
ende," however, is much more
substantial than the usual myths
about Spaniards make out. It was
this "duende" which led to such
a fierce confrontation of ideology
during the Spanish Civil War. The
fighting was not the result of a
mere "power" struggle. It was an
intense clash of ideas and beliefs.
The passion of this struggle is cap-
tured in "To Die in Madrid"
(showing at the Campus Theater).
The film is a documentary con-
sisting almost completely of news-
reel footage; but newsreels so
molded as to be a forceful inter-
pretation. Blending , techniques
from the two types of document-
ary films, those which are edited
from eristing footage and those
whicn the author shoots himself,
it is consciously in the tradition
of the best of these, recalling
"Over There" and "Nanook of
the North." The small parts which
were shot in modern Spain provide
excellent transition and comment
on the first-hand footage. This is
a unique documentary and one
which denies all the disadvantages
usualy ascribed to the document-
ary style. It flows with an even
and relentless rhythm.
"In Spain," wrote a French ob-
server, "men fall like the leaves
of autumn." We feel this in Or-
well's "Homage to Catalonia,"
Borkenau's "The Spanish Cockpit"
and now in "To Die in Madrid."
For the fighters who came from
all over the world and from all
walks of life to defend the Repub-
lic, the war was a romantic and
horrifying event; they were en-
acting a legend. The speeches of
La Passionaria and Unamuno, the
poems of Lorca, and the songs of
the International Brigades all ex-
press this romanticism. The film
returns again and again to the

motif of gunfire, reminding you
that this, and not spots on the
map, is what war is made of.
The mood of "To Die in Madrid"
is, to a great extent, the result of
the narration. The words of Sir
John Gielgud, William Hut, Irene
Worth, and George Gonneau are
always beautiful, often moving.
The tone of Gielgud's voice when
he says "The Condor Division" or
of Irene Worth's when she says of
the International Brigades "They
will die in Madrid" is as memora-
ble as any of the things we see.
The same sort of honesty, inte-
grity, and hope that characterized
loyalist forces is apparent in
Rosif's direction. He does not re-
sort to whitewashing or politick-
ing. Instead, he presentsran inten-
sely humanistic appraisal of the
aspirations of the Republicans_
the procrastination of the inter-
national diplomats-the entry of
German and Italian troops on the
side of the Falange-the inevitable
defeat which followed this. Rosif's
belief that this is a tragedy must
be your belief. He does not have to
try to convince us. This is the
power and force of this mag-
nificent film. We have no reserva-
tions.
TONIGHT at 8 P.M.

1

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Shown at C"iaLL
7:05 Only i
wialte matthaus.- MA=j~
PLUS--"Switzerland Sportland"
Color Cartoon
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

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ALL-CAMPUS
THANKSGIVING
WORSHIP SERVICE

TUESDAY,
7:00 P.M.

NOVEMBER 22
1131 CHURCH

For reservations,
cal 662-5529

Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center

HOLIDAY MATINEES
Thursday & Friday
This Week Only
at 1:30 P.M.
Thanksgiving Day $2.25
Friday $1.50

WINNER OF 6
ACADEMY AWARDSI

Schools Attend Conference,
Discuss Selective Service

Speaker: NEIL TROUTMAN 68
Sponsored by
.. r BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Program Information NO 26264 , ---.,- j--
TODAY! The University of Michigan
TeisU Vina Geore Gilbert & Sullivan Society
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Nov. 30, Dec. 1-3
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(Continued from Page 1)
their schools to the actions of the
conference. Davis and Rothchild
charged that the delegates did not
comprise "a representative body
of the academic community."
The conference's recommenda-
tions also called for:
-A draft only in time of na-
tional peril.
-Abolishment of student defer-
ments.
-A lottery system for selection,
instead of the present system.
Allowing men called to serve
the country in other ways, such as
Peace Corps workers, as alterna-
tives to military service.
The conference report will be
sent to the National Advisory,
Commission on Selective Service,
appointed by President Johnson to
study draft laws.
In Baltimore the director of
Selective Service said Sunday that
"Most people advocating a pro-
posed national draft lottery sys-
tem don't really know what they're
talking about."
"I'm a little disturbed that the
lottery argument is sold on the
basis of certainty," Lt. Gen. Lewis
B. Hershey said. "There isn't any-
thing certain about a lottery when
we can't predict how many men
we will have to. take."
Last week, both Defense Sec-
retary Robert S. McNamara and

Labor Secretary W. Willart Wirtz
said some kind of lottery system
was necessary to eliminate defici-
encies in the method of making
deferments.
Lower Standards Needed
Hershey' didn't mention the
Cabinet members by name in his
talk before the Chizuk Amuno
Brotherhood, but he said the only
thing wrong with the present draft
is that there aren't enough people
in it.
'"There's no use talking about
being completely fair when 56 per
cent are rejected,"-Hershey said.
He urged that physical and intel-
lectual standards be lowered and
the armed. forces devote more ef-
fort to correcting such deficiencies
after induction.

FOR FUN AND
PROFIT-
Read and Use'
The Daily's
Classified Ads !

CINEMA I1
presents
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SILENT
WORLD"
IN COLOR
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SHORT SUBJECT:
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in color
Sat. & Sun. only
7 & 9:15 P.M.
Aud. A, Angell Hall
50c

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER
PRESENTS
A CARLO PONTI PRODUCTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM
OF BORIS PASTERNAKS
ZU WAGO0
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Nights Except Matinees on
Sunday at 8 P.M. Sat. & Sun. at
Sunday at 7:30 1:30
All Night Seats Sat. Mat. $1.50
$2.25 Sun. Mat. $2.25
Read
Daily
Classifieds

*
-I

University School of Music and Department of Art
DON PASQUALE
BY GAETANO DONIZETTI
"SPRITELY, DELIGHTFUL"--Ann Arbor News
Final performance TONIGHT AT 8:00
Lydia Menedssohn Theatre-$3.00 and $2.50
GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE

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Seats onSale Now!
at PTP Subscription Office-Mendelssohn Theatre

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PERSONALIZED QUEEN'S
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a .
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Sparkling silvery banded
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Ends Wednesday 1 I,
"A CLASSIC elegy on a bitter
war - a masterpiece'. -BrianO0 oherty, Li
to die In madrid
"A MASTERPIECE
NOT TO BE MISSED"
Judith Crisl. Herald TribnS
"MAGNIFICENT, you are really missing
something if you pass this one up."
-William Wolf, Cue

r
ue

TONIGHT
at 7 & 9 P.M.

'0

BURT LL.ANCASTER
...the dynamiter

i

T.E PROFESSiONBIS

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