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November 18, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-18

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1966

. ,

~?AGTWOTHE ICHGAN AIL FRnAYNOVMBER18_1_.

LEADERS FEAR LULL:
Pentagon Opposes Christmas
Bombing Pause in Viet Nam

Communist Parties
Denounce Red China

TONIGHT AT 8 P.M.
I WINNER OF 6
ACADEMY AWARDS!

WASHINGTON (')- Like other
Johnson administration officials,
top Pentagon leaders are stead-
fastedly against another Christ-,
mastime pause in the U.S. bomb-
ing of targets in North Viet Nam.
The Pentagon officials are
known to believe there is no evi-
dence now that Hanoi would re-
spond affirmatively - either by
taking steps to reduce the fighting
or to begin peace talks-if the
bombs stopped falling over the
North.
As of today , officials believe
the North Vietnamese would use
any lull to do what they did dur-
ing last year's pause-"take mnaxi-
mum advantage,''"as one:official
put it.
In a series of interviews, offi-
cials voiced concern that a bomb-'
ing pause would give -the enemy

a chance to repair bridges, rail-
roads and improve the distribution
of badly shattered- petroleum and
oil stocks.
"They went full blast last year,"
said one well-informed source.
"They'll do the same thing again.
Any time you have one day or 37
days in which you aren't ham-
pered, you do what you can."
There have been reports that-
Pope Paul VI again will call for a
Christmas cease-fire and bombing
pause in Viet Nam. President
Johnson ordered a pause in the
bombings last Dec. 24 and called
for their resumption Jan. 31 after
reporting the United States had
received no indication that Hanoi
was willing to begin peace talks.
Opposition to another pause at
this time has strongly united the
Pentagon's top military and civil-

ian leaders-men who don't al-
ways see' eye to eye. Secretary of
Defense Robert S. McNamara and'
the Joint Chiefs of Staff are re-
liably reported to be against any
lull.
Some Pentagon officials disagree.
widely on the effects of the al-
most daily U.S. bombings in the
North.
For some officials, the most sig-
nificant effect of the air raids
has been on enemy morale.
"When we bomb," one source'
said, "the North Vietnamese are
forced to confine their movements
to nighttime and use all kinds of
subterfuges.
"When they're on the move,
they can't even settle down for
the night or light a fire to cook'
rice."
Asked specifically what the
North Vietnamese could accom-
plish during another month-long
bombing pause, one official said:
"It's hard to assess quantitatively
in terms of the movement of men
and materials."
In term of domestic repairs,
however, sources said they believe
the 300,00-man work force in
North Viet Nam could at least ac-
complish what a similar team did
during the bombing pause last
year and minimally repair all es-
sential roads, bridges and rail
lines.

SOFIA, Bulgaria (P)-The little
Communist parties of the world
heaped abuse on Red China at the
Bulgarian party congress yester-
day.
China is being accused of black-
ening the name of communism by
the things done in the "great cul-
tural revolution" and in promoting
"the thinking of Mao Tse-tung."
The little parties of the West-
ern and underdeveloped worlds
are worried over losing influence
at home. Someof them have al-
most none to begin with because
of public revulsion from China's
errant" brand of communism.
Denunciations of China have-
along with attacks on U.S. policy
in Viet Nam-become a main
theme of the Bulgarian Commu-
nist party's congress, now being
held in this gray and chilly Bal-
kan capital.
With some 75 parties gathered,
this is the first big meeting of the
world Communist movement since
China's "cultural revolution"-or,
purge- began.
The chief guest here, Soviet
Communist le a d e r Leonid I.
Brezhnev, set the theme by ac-
cusing Chinese leaders of "striving
to foment in the Chinese people a
feeling of hatred" for Communist
countries, of trying. to split the
movement, and of pursuing "nar-
row nationalist aims."
The attacks here have been
getting stronger asrdelegates from'
the little parties addressed the
congress, which lasts all this week.
Several parties have waxed an-
gry at Chinese splitting of the
Communist movement.,What some
of these groups mean is that they

are worried about pro-Chinese
factions in their own parties.
Almost half the parties repre-
sented here have now spoken. On-
ly. three have . clearly opposed a
Soviet-inspired move to hold a
world Communist conference to
declare China an outcast. They are
the Romanian, Italian and North,
Korean parties.
Experienced observes suggest
that the Kremlin is trying, by
opening public discussion of a con-
ference, to raise the general tem-
perature within the Communist
movement and thus make an even-
tual conference possible despite
laggard parties.
Phone 482-2056
OnENm5 n. MCARPENTERSRAD-
OPEN 5:30 P.M.-FREE HEATERS

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER
PRESENTS
ACARLO PONTI PRODUCTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM
OF BORIS PASTERNAKS
DOCIOR
IN PANAVISIONAND METROCOLOR
Nights Except Matinees on
Sunday at 8 P.M. Sat. & Sun. at
Sunday at 7:30 1 :30 k
All Night Seats Sat. Mat. $1.50
$2.25 Sun. Mat. $2.25
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

' T NTONIGHT
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I a
American, Comedy with the
effervescent American screen idol-
Douglas Fairbanks
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SHORTS: "4' Minutes From
Hollywood" with Laurel & Hardy
S"The Clever Dummy"-Ben Turpin
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"Hard Boiled Years"-Billy West
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UN Approves tse of Force
To End Rhodesian Rebellion

4
*

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (') --
The U.N. General Assembly over-
whelmingly urged, Britain yester-
day to' use force if necessary to
end the Rhodesian rebellion.
The assembly aproved 89 to 2 a
'53 nation resolution' calling on
Britain "to take all' necessary
measures, including, in particular,
the use of force" to'overthrow the
white minority regime of Prime
Minister Ian Smith.
- Portugal and South Africa cast
the two negative votes. The reso-
lution condemned the two .nations
for their support of the Smith
regime.
The force of the resolution was
weakened by abstentions from
Britain, the United States and 15
other nations from Western Eur-
ope., They emphasized that they,
could not back demands .for force.
when all other: measures, including
mandatory - economic sanctions,
have not been. taken.
The resolution passed the as-
sembly's -trusteeship committee!
Nov. 10 by a vote of 94 to 2. Sev-
enteen nations-, including Britain
and the Uited- States, abstained
after they .failed to persuade the,
sponsors to modify it.
- Ii addition to rebuking Portu-
gal and South Africa, the resolu-
tion 'condemns the "foreign fi-
hancial and other sources" who
have been trading with Smith '

The resolution 'condemns in ad-
vance any agreement Britain may.
reach with the Smith government
that does not guarantee the Africa
majority in Rhodesia the right to
self-determination.

ton deb
Shown at
9:10 only
uJatew mathau.J
PLUS-"Switzerland Sportland"
Color Cartoon

r

~1

Realtors Pledge Fight
Against Open Housing

MIAMI BEACH, Fla,. (-The
nation's real estate men listened
yesterday to a Cabinet member's
plea for open . housing, then
pledged themselves to continue an
aggressive fight against it.
Robert C. Weaver, secretary of
housing and urban development,
told the convention of the Nation-'
al Association of Real Estate
Boards that the debate over equal-
housing rights had raged for 200
years. The time has come, he said,
for an end to it..
"There is no question any
more," he said, "of whether there
must be equal opportunity for: all
persons to acquire the housing
they can afford.
"It is urgent. It is legally man-.
datory. It is morally- right. And,

furthermore, it is good for busi
ness."
-But soon after Weaver spoke
his arguments were - rejected b3
delegates representing 83,00
members of the real estate busi
ness.
In a resolution, they pledge
"aggressive resistance to any ac
tion which would vest in govern
ment, at any level, control ove
the sale or rental of privatel
owned property."
The right to own, occupy, ad
minister and dispose of housing
the: resolution added "is inheren
to the American tradition guaran-
teed by the Constitution and the
Bill Hof Rights, and indispensablf
to.the. maintenance of a free so-
ciety."
Weaver told the conventior
President Johnson "put it clearl3
when he said: 'As long as the colo
of a man's skin determines hi
choice of housing, no investmen
in the physicalhrebuilding of ou
cities will free the men and womer
living there.' "
"There is no question," Weaves
added, "of whether there will bE
more mobility for minorities i
the pursuit of housing. It is hap
pening-but at a snail's pace.
"Will' we continue to expan
housing opportunities for non
whites primarily by extendinE
ghettos?' he asked. "Or will we
provide -accelerated residentia.
mobility for all Americans an(
thereby begin to solve the minor
ity housing problem?"

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"A CLASSiCelegy on a bitter
war - a masterpiece! arian O'Dohrty, L
to tie In ma2driat
"A MASTERPIECE
NOT TO BE MISSED"
-Judih Crist. Herald Tribune
"MAGNIFICENT, you are realtlymissing
something if you pass this one up.
-William Wolf, Cue

Fr
FE

DIAL
8-64 16

PRESENTS
THE NEW YORK CITY OPERA
in 3 renowned operas
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
"LA TRAVIATA" .... Sat., Nov. 19, 8:00 P.M.
(in Italian
"TOSCA".. ........ Sun., Nov. 20, 2:30 P.M.
(in Italian)
"THE CONSUL" . . . Sun., Nov. 20, 8:00 P.M.
(in English)
Tickets: $5:00-$4.50-$4.00-$3.50-$2.50,-$1.50
at
University Musical Society, Burton Tower
Telephone: 665-3717-Mon. through Fri., 9 to 4:30; Sot., 9-12.
(Also Hill Auditorium box office 1 12 hours preceding performances.)

I

,

Daily Classifieds Get Results)

i . i I }'. .. e" " T"} r Q aYIA br. ."r ::"","n}1F$1 v7t.," A t.;t I..r.,i"
..i. Is1 :n. t ~ t? h;T}n i.. b } sI r. :.. T} :..rEUYi' U l4E !. h{:iS .S: Utv
_ , OTCE l
" :.:

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered organizations
only. Forms are available in Room 1011
SAB.
* ' *'
Square Dance Club, Third in a se-
ries of dances and instructions with
guest caller, Nov. 19, 8-11 p.m., Wom-
en's Athletic Bldg. All students, fac-
ulty and staff'invited.,
* * *
Alpha Lambda .Delta,Initiation of
new members,- Nov. 19, 12:30 'p.m.,
Kalamazoo Room, Michigan League.
* * *
NJewmn Student. Association, Com-
muinity Mass ' and supper, Nov. 18, 5110
p~m., Newman, Center, 331 Thompson.
Newman Student Association, Cath-
olic Voice lecture, John Noonan: "Re-
ligious Attitudes on Contraception,"
Nov. 18, 8 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Reception inmediately' follo'wing at
Newman Center, 331 Thompson.
Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia-Span-
ish conversation in an Hispanic at-
mosphere, Mon., Nov. 21, 3.5 p.m., 3050
Frieze Bldg.

Capitalism, What?", Nov. 18, 12-1 p.m.,
Guild House, 802 Monroe.
** *
Guild House, Friday evening dinner
and concert (Prof. 'W. P. Malim and
his' group), Nov. 18, dinner at . p.m.,
concert at 8 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
ATID, Bagels and lox brunch with
address by= Pr. Herbert Paper, Nov. 20,
1 p.m., 1429 Hill.
B'nai B'rith Hillel, Sabbath service
and discussion: "Is There a Ratidnale
for Thanksgiving Today?", Nov.d18,
7,15 p.m., 1429 ]ill.

n
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ENDS TONIGHT
JacK Lemmon
WaLKe maTmau
DILLY fWLmDe'S
e FOmune cOoKie
rI1 ar as unrg 'iiTeO aRTISTS

ORROW!

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-

Baha'i Student Grbup,
cussion, Nov. 18, 8 pm.,'
Apt, 5. All welcome.'

Informal dis-
335 E. Huron,

"AM ERICANS PLUS ONE"
FRIDAY, Nov. 18 8:30 -11:30
A RK COF F EE HOQUS E
141Hill St.-
::y ?:?v Rii::...:{ { .r .:".,..{::"": ySi:"+::i::??." y:{y:y": '::::S:: . ' ' { :

Folk Dance. Club.,(WAA), FoIX -dance
with. instruction open to everyone,
Fri. Nov. 18 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.
Cinema II, Tq Iilla* Mockingbird,"
award-best actor of the year, Nov. 19
and 20, 7 and 9:15 p.m., Aud. A, An-
Bell Hall.
Guld House, Friday noon luncheon,
Tom' Mayer: "Industrial Sdciety-After

rw"

5- --,

CINEMA
presents
GREGORY PECK'S,
Academy Award
winning performance
in-
"To kiill A
-Mockingbird"

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Back Yet Again!

BUZ BARCLAY
Singing his praises
PLUS

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Seats Avalable Now!
at PTP Subscription Office-Mendelssohn Theatre

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a special

guest appearance
of the

Reader in Residence

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A.Ak m-ro-a 9..Y

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