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November 16, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-16

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAISY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16,196G

PAGE TWO TUE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16. 1986

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THEATRE
'Royal Hunt' Provides Contrast
In CiVilizations, Personalities

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By ANN L. MARCHIO
The Play of the Month Series,
sponsored by the Professional
Theatre Program, premiered this
week with the "Royal Hunt of the
Sun."
Written by Peter Schaffer, the
play presents an unusual effect of
static scenery animated by the.:
movement of the characters.
Rhythm seems to have been the
unconscious by-word in the stage
:irection by Randall Brooks. The
implantation of an enormous sun
in the center of the stage func-
tions as a constant reminder of the
dual drive of man toward wealth
and power.
In fact, the intermingling:. of
parallel and anthesis accounts for
most of the dramatic impact of
the. production. Two empires are
contrasted, Spain and the Inca
civilization of Peru. Opposing their.

iative states are Pizzaro, played
by W. B. Brydon and the sovereign
Inca, Atahuallpa, played by Clay-
ton Corbin. With their similarity
of birth and ambition and their
,onflicting values, the two men
prove to be striking foils to each
other.
Brydon's Pizzaro experiences
love for the first time, responding
to a man who had no conception
of love. An the Inca leader sub-
mits to execution to prove. his
faith in his divinity. Both succomb
to their desire to overcome death.
Language Barrier
Although there was a weakness
in reconciling the language barrier
between the Incas and the Span-
iards, the mime by Claudt Chagrin
was successful enough to allow
for the apparent breaches. Some
of the most subtle humor came
from just the inconsistancy.

Irreconcilable to the plot, how-
ever, was the inclusion of Martin
Ruiz the Elder, played by Michael
Egan. Not only was it disappoint-
ing that such a harsh man would
evolve from the gentle youth, but
his inclusion of significant data
was artificial and cast the pro-
duction as more of a historical
play than a scorching drama.
However, the whole of the sec-
ond act is a rewarding climax of
the two powerful personalities.
rhe success of the play rests heav-
ily on the shoulders of Brydon
and Corbin. Without their strong
support, the "Royal Hunt of the
Sun" would have ended with the
conquest of Peru.
The next PTP Play of the Month
presentation will be "Luv," star-
ring Nancy Walker and Scott
McKay on Dec. 13-14 in Hill Aud.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16
4:15 p.m.-Percival Price will
give the School of Music lecture,
"Bells and Magic," in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
7:30 p.m.-James Gannett of
the Boeing SST Project Pilot will
speak to the Aeronautics & Astro-
nautics Institute student branch
meeting in 1042 E. Engin.
8:30 p.m. - David Yeomans,
piano, will give his degree recital
in the Recital Hall of the School
of Music.
THURSDAY, NOV.17
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.--The Cinema
Guild will present "Wild and
Woolly" in the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The School of Music
and the Lepartment of Art Opera
will combine to present Donizetti's
"Don Pasquale" in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society Dance Concert will
present the American Ballet Thea-
tre in Hill Aud.
FRIDAY, NOV. 18
4:00 p.m.-David Pears of Ox-
ford University will give the Phil-
osophy Dept. Lecture on "The
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
TheDaily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-8429.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16

Function of General Propositions
in the Explanations of Actions" in
Angell Hall Aud C.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-The Cinema
Guild will present "Wild and
Woolly" in the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The School of Music
and the Dept. of Art Opera will
combine to present Donizetti's
"Don Pasqnale" in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
SATUDAY, NOV. 19
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-The Cinema
Guild will present "Experimental
Film Program No. 2" in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The New York City
Opera Company will present "La
Traviata" by Guiseppe Verdi in
Hill Aud.
Phone 482-2056
6Etax Ox.CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 5:30 P.M.-FREE HEATERS
NOW SHOWING

CHARLTON HESTON
REX HARRISON
in
THE AGONY AND
THE ECSTASY
Tonight's Shows at 6:48 & 9:05
<THURSDAY

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We are finishing
our 15th year in te
JOHN LEIDY SHOP
We thank all of You
for your help during
the last 15 years.
John Leidy Shop
601 and 607 EA Liberty St
NO 8-6779 Ann Arbor

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JOIN THE DAILY STAFF

A

MASS RECLASSIFICATION:

I

WSU Officials Fail To Notify
Draft Boards of 2-S Standing

TONIGHT AT 8 P.M.
WINNER OF 6
ACADEMY AWARDSI

Collegiate Press Service.
DETROIT, Mich.-Nearly 6,000
Wayne State University males felt
the draft -squeeze last week after
that school mistakenly failed to
notify any Selective Service boards
that students were registered for
classes.
The Wayne State Daily Colle-
gian broke the news Nov. 3 after
its- editor, a full-time student, was
reclassified I-A. Vartan Kupellan,l
in checking with his local board,
discovered that it- had never re-
ceived the University's reports;
due Oct. 29.
Dr. William Knapp, Director of
Student Personnel, admitted that
there was some tie-up in proces-
sing. "We didn't expect the boards
to classify so quickly," he said.
Mass Reclassification
The next day scores of students
indicated that they had been re-
classified. Some had also received
their orders to report for a pre-
induction physical examination.
The University made hurried
phone calls- to the local boards
surrounding Detroit-95 per cent
of Wayne's students come from
the area-claiming it was later
discovered, that there had been a'
computer breakdown. Most of the
boards agreed to hold off further
reclassification for a few days.
Officials in the school's data
processing office denied, however,
that there had been any trouble
with the electronic systems.
Data processing began running
the forms a few hours after the
student newspaper made its dis-
covery. They were delivered to
draft boards the next afternoon.
Full Responsibility
University . president William
Keast, -apparently one. of the .ast
to find out about the delay, -as-
sumed full responsibility for the
incident but offered little expla-
nation for its occurrence.
It -is still not clear precisely
where the blame lies for the de-
lay. Administrators indicated that
had students not been reclassified
in droves, thus bringing the situa-
tion into the open, the stall might
have lasted another five or six
days.
James P. McCormick, Vice Pres-
ident for Student Affairs, blamed
the "bureaucratic system" and a
lack of communication for not
having known that the problem
existed.
Processing personnel maintained
that the only reason the reports
were not sent out earlier was that

they received no orders to begin turned o0
the run until Nov. 3. knowingt
Knapp insisted that data pro- not be ink
cessing knew the reports were to Service ha
be done and, indeed, had been said he wa
punching the IBM cards for them way.,
all along. The Se
Knapp said, however, that he told him,]
had never thought of the job as are not ix
the "staggering emergency" it kids are g

ut to be. He admitted
that the reports would
by the time the Selective
ad "requested" them, but
as counting on some lee-
lective Service had not
Knapp said, that if forms
n on the dot "all your
going to be reclassified."

Antioch Abolishs ss Day Calendar
Actuarial Research Conference-Mich-
igan Union, 8:30 a.m.
R ank for U nderclassm en School of Music Lecture - Percival
Price, "Bells and Magic": Rackham
Lecture Hall, 4:15 p.m.

Collegiate Press Service -
YELLOW SPRINGS, Ohio-The
Administrative Council of Antioch
College, altering a previous stand,
this week voted overwhelmingly to
discontinue ranking underclass
males for the Selective Service
system:, but to continue compiling
class ranks for fourth and fifth
year students.
The action provided that the
College furnish each upperclass
student a statement of his rank in
class and leave him the choice of
whether he wants to forward it. to
his, local draft board.
This week's vote was in marked
contrast to the Council's 64 de-
cision Sept. 13 to cease ranking all
students for Selective Service.
That action, taken by the last
quarter's council, was contingent
on ratification by the fall quarter
council. The present .decision is
still subject to routine examina-
tion by the College's board of trus-
tees, who meet this weekend.
Antioch has a unique five-year
program that divides the student
body into two sections, which al-
ternate periods of work and study
during the four-quarter year.
Thus the student body on cam-
pus this quarter, and its represen-
tatives on the administrative
council, is totally different from
that which participated in last se-
mester's debates.
The Administrative Council in-
cludes 3 students, 6 faculty mem-
bers or administrators, and the
president of the College, who is
chairman.
Antioch college president James
P. Dixon said he considered the
compromise action "not contra-
dictory" to the previous decision
which he termed an "extreme,
polarized position."
The compromise was put forth
by Dean of Students J. D. Dawson,
who argued that the decision to

deal with local draft boards is the School of Music Degree Recital-David
obligation of the student and not Yeomans, piano: Recital Hall, School
the college. Dawson said that the of Music, 8:30 p.m.
college should give students as Southern Asia Club: A panel discus-
many alternatives as possible for sion by participants in the Philippine-
gaining a 2-S deferment. American Assembly on "Democracy in
Southeast. Asia: The Philippine Ex-
Dawson argued that it would periment" will be held in the Multi-
not be fair to rank students during purpose Room of the UGLI on Wed.,
Nov. 16, at 8 p.m. Anyone interested
their first three years because of s invited to attend.
unique elements in the Antioch
program. Freshmen do not receive Research Club: The November meet-
grades, within the College's first- lng of the Research Club of the Uni-
versity of Michigan will be held on
year program, and some ungraded wed., Nov. 16, Rackham Amphitheatre,

tony_:debbie ' pat
cartis zreynolds Iboons
Shown at
'7:05 Only
wvaiter matt hau T
PLUS-"Switzerland Sportland"
Color Cartoon
CINEMA
II
presents
GREGORY PECK'S
Academy Award
winning performance
in
"To Kill A.
Mockingbird
Sat. & Sun..
Only
7.&9P.M.
Aud. A, Angell Hall

I

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METRO-GOLDWYNMAYER
PRESENTS
A CARLO PONTI PRODUCTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM
OF BORIS PASTERNAKS
DOCIDR
ZiHAiWN AGO
IN PANhvls~nAND J0METROCOLOR

I

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT & SULLIVAN SOCiETY
H. M. S. PINAFORE
Nov. 30, Dec. 1-3
Cv
Tickets on Sale Nov. 16, 17, 18 FISHBOWL
Wed., Thurs. Performances-.-$1.50
Fri., Sat. Performances---------.$2.00
Sat. Matinee .. ... $1.00
HELD OVER
some people will do anything for $249,000.92

fV
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Nights Except
Sunday at 8 P.M.
Sunday at 7:30
All Night Seats
$2.25

'Matinees on
Sat. & Sun. at
:30
Sat. Mat. $1.50
Sun. Mat. $2.25

i

meG rtwitSeI con presents
JACK .emmon
WaLTeR maTIHau
ILLY WILDeR'S
THe .oRTURn COOKI
Dial NO 2-6264

courses carry over into the second
year. About half of the College's
third-year students study abroad
and receive academic credit with
no grades during this period.
Dawson said ranking was most
critical for seniors. In his formal
statement, he said "if the college
refuses to rank its senior students,
then those with scores of less than
80 on the national Selective Serv-
ice exam have no chance for de-
ferment, regardless of their ac-
ceptance by graduate or profes-
sional schools."

at 8 p.m.
The Henry Russel Lecturer for 1967
will be announced
Speakers for the evening will be
Prot. John Arthos, on ,!Galileo and
Milton," and Prof. Lawrence Slobodkin
on "Goals and Evolution."
Botany Seminar:. Dr. Robert Lowry
will speak on "Zoospore Development
in Physoderma," Wed., Nov. 16, 4:15
p.m., 1139 Natural Science Bldg.
5-Hour Special Topics in Chemistry.
7th Series: The 7th series are being
given by Dr. J. Verdieck and Dr. J.
Wiseman, U. of M.sChemistry Depart-
ment, on "Some Selected Topics in
Photochemistry." The second talk will
(Continued on Page 6)

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