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November 15, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1966 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEThN

a aati\u UV 1 L1\

I

Cassius
Clay TKOsTl
For Title

Claws

'Cat'

in

Third

I

VOICE - sns
GENERAL MEETING
RANKING ACTION NOW

Kolverines Ride High on Desire

By JIM LaSOVAGE
Associate Sports Editor

i

HOUSTON (A') - Cassius Clay
floored plodding 33-year-old Cleve-
land Williams four times and stop-
ped him on a technical knockout
in 1:08 of the third round last
night in his seventh defense of
the. world heavyweight boxing
championship.
Williams, who still has a police-
man's bullet in his body and
lucky to be alive, was no match
for the undefeated 24-year-old
champion.
No Chance
Referee Harry Kessler of St.
Louis ended the slaughter by step-
ping between the two men with
Williams wobbling on shaky knees
with eyes glazed and no longer
able to protect himself.
Clay, who prefers to be known
as Muhammad Ali, floored the
once-feared slugger three times in
the second round and once in the
third before the end.
Apparently stung by those who
said he could not punch, Clay
swarmed over the challenger in
the secound round and threw
every punch in the book after feel-
ing him out in the first.
But Not the Last
A right hand dropped Williams
for the first time in the second
round. He was down for about two
and then took the mandatory
eight count..
Abarrage of blows sent the
stunned Williams to the deck
again, but he popped up quickly.
Once again, Referee Kessler tolled
the mandatory eight count.
Actually, Williams was saved by
the bell at the end of the second.
A right hand by Cassius sent him
floundering on his back, apparent-
ly finished for the night. When
the count had reached five the bell
sounded.
Cassius came out for the kill in
the third, throwing caution to the
wind as he swarmed to the attack.
Down went the Houston veteran
again, shaken and in bad shape.
Had To End
After the mandatory eight
count, Clay resumed his punish-
ment barrage until Referee Kes-
sler..stopped it.
As he left the ring, Clay pointed
to Ernie Terrell, the World Box-
ing Association champ, at ringside
and said, "You're next."
"I am ready," said Terrell, who
is supposed to be all set for a bout
with Clay Feb. 6 at an undeter-
mined site.
A record indoor crowd of 35,460
turned out at the magnificent
Astrodome, but they didn't get
much for their money. Williams, a
S5-1 underdog, never had a chance.
It was as simple as that.

Michigan's 28-20 gridiron tri-
umph over Northwestern last Sat-
urday was not just a combina-
tion of Dick Vidmer's passes to
Jack Clancy and the gains made
by Carl Ward, Jim Detwiler and
Dave Fisher crashing into the line.
And it was more than a determ-
ined line and a stubborn second-
ary. Probably the biggest factor in
the win was emotion.
This was the last home game
for two dozen guys who have
busted their guts for four years
to wear a blue uniform on 10
Saturdays of the year, The desire
for this win built up during the
first part of the game as these
men realized that it was the last
chance to do something for the
Blue in Ann Arbor.
Mouth-Watering
The players could taste the de-
sire. After losses against Purdue
and Illinois, in which they did
all but outscore the foe, they were
hungry for a win.
The fans could even hear the
desire. The usual "click" of two
lines meeting headon was magni-
fied to an assortment of "crunch-
es," "thuds," and "oofs." It's too
bad that there is no way to meas-
ure yardage gained on second ef-
forts, or even third and fourth

efforts. Quite a few of Michigan's aond half, but it wasn't the way it
244 yards rushing came on these started. Northwestern had hopes1
determined extra efforts. The of salvaging a season of sub-me-I
emotional conduct of the game diocrity by ruining what was left
helped the backs to drive just a of the Wolverines' self-pride. The
little bit harder, past one more Wildcats took the opening kickoff
tackler, one more yard for the and controlled the ball for over
first down. half of the first period in a drive
Inauspicious Start that ended with a 7-0 lead over
This was the general strain of ' Michigan.
the game, especially in the sec- Michigan marched right back

began to take it out of the upset-
tending Wildcats.
Still, in the first half, North-
western ran off 42 plays to the
Wolverines' 33, and 10 of Michi-
gan's came in the last two min-
utes in a desperation drive toward#
the goal line.
After halftime Michigan came
out with high hopes, but a few
sloppy plays were costly. North-
western caught Stan Kemp be-
fore he could get a punt away,
and took possession of the ball
on the Michigan 15. The defense
held the Wildcats to a three-
pointer.
Out of the Game
Now the team came to life. Vid-
mer conducted a 78-yard march
in 17 plays, with all four backs
carrying the ball and both ends
receiving passes. Every play went
for a gain, with Vid finishing it
with a two-yard sneak for the
score. Rick Sygar put the Wol-
verines in front for the first time
with the extra point, his 29th con-
secutive conversion this season.
He made it 30 for 30 after Michi-
gan's final score.
Emotional Factor
The offense worked well Sat-
urday, but it had throughout most
of -the season. Yet in games like
Purdue and Illinois it didn't mat-
ter how well the offense worked.
Mistakes seemed to take care of
the outcome. But Saturday there
was one added factor which in-
fluenced the outcome. The pent-
up desire of a bunch of seniors
who had just one ychance left.
Billboafrd
Michigan's soccer club will try
to conclude their season on the
upbeat this Saturday when they
host the University of Waterloo
at 2 p.m. at Wines Field. Last
Saturday's 6-2 defeat at Water-
loo left the club with a 3-3-1
season's record.

8:00 TONIGHT

3rd Floor Conference,

Union

[j MICRO-CLEANING
means careful attention to details

As you know, people are better than machines when
it comes to the fine details of properly finishing a
suit or dress. That's why each Greene's plant has
fashion-wise, skilled pressers to carefully touch up
each garment by hand. Linings, lapels, bows, and
pleats all get individual attention.
It's another extra Greene's customers expect-and
get.

Wildcats' McKelvey Appears 'Upset' with 'M' Spirit

C, - f

GRID SELECTIONS
Fred Salomon, formerly of 415 E. Hoover, Ann Arbor, won last
week's Grid Picks contest for the second time this year. Salomon
claims he has only missed one game all year but keeps forgetting to
put his name on his entry. Motions have been made to make Salo-
mon an honorary member of The Daily sports staff, establish him
as a weekly guest selector, and to run him out of town, in efforts
to give someone else a chance.
The latter course was finally chosen since Salomon is illiterate.

with the equalizer, but the Wild-
cats continued to control the ball.

ii

One drive yielded a field goal and
a fumble recovery paved the way
to another touchdown drive, giv-
ing Northwestern a 17-7 lead.
Now or Never
It was about at this point that
the Wolverines realized that if
they were going to do something
it had to be soon. Michigan's
drive after the kickoff was cli-
maxed with a 49-yard scoring pass
from Vidmer to Detwiler. The play
put new life into the Blue and

i

"I find that being illiterate helps me stay in mental harmony with'- -
college football today," Salomon was heard gurgling as he went''
down for the third time in a vat of tar. M iller Grabs
Two Cottage Inn dinners await the winner of this week's contest.
Bring your entries to 420 Maynard St. by midnight Friday. If you Tram p Title
don't mind cold pizza, you can have Salomon's too.

east side
3033 Packard
NO 3-1336

west side
1940 W. Stadium
NO 2-2543

campus
1213 S. University
NO 3-3016

main plant Ypsilanti
516 E. Liberty 40 E Michigan
NO 2-3231 HU 2-5371

THIS WEEK'S GAMES
MICHIGAN at Ohio State Kentucky at Tennessee
Illinois at Northwestern USC at UCLA-
Indiana at Purdue Washington vs. Washington
Wisconsin at Minnesota State (at Spokane)
Notre Dame at Michigan State Yale at Harvard
Penn State at Pitt Utah State at Utah
Oregon at Oregon State Duke at North Carolina
Baylor at Southern Methodist Syracuse at West Virginia
Wyoming at Brigham Young Xavier at Kent State
Boston College at Massachusetts Southern Colorado at
Stanford at California Colorado School of Mines

Michigan junior Wayne Miller
reached another keynote last!
weekend with a first place f in-
ish in a European meet in .Kiel,
West Germany. Miller, who com-
peted unattached in the contest,
defeated the best trampolinists in
Europe to cop the crown. The
Lafayette, La., gymnast is also
the first person ever to win all
Big Six trampoline titles: Mid-
west, Big Ten, NCAA, NAAU,
Schuster Cup and World.
- t

Naval Ship Systems Command needs

engine

Pro Standings

1

NFL
Eastern Conference
W L T Pet. Pts. OP
St. Louis 7 2 1 .778 221 177
Dallas 6 2 1 .750 320 160
Cleveland 6 3 0 .667 267 147
Washington 5 5 0 .500 204 232
Philadelphia 5 5 0 .500 154 234
Pittsburgh 3 5 1 .375 179 233
New York 1 7 1 .125 131 289
Atlanta 0 9 0 .000 102 318
Western conference
4W Green Bay 7 2 0 .778 233 101
Baltimore 7 2 0 .778 232 139
San Francisco 4 3 2 .571 183 202
Los Angeles 5 5 0 .500 199 169
Chicago 3 4 2 .429 134 163
Minnesota 3 5 1 .375 201 178
Detroit 3 6 1 .333 153, 211
Scores
NBA
Detroit at San Francisco (inc)
NHL
No games scheduled
SPORTS NiGHT EDITOR:
CLARK NORTON

THE IFC
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
PROUDLY PRESENTS
PAUL LAUTER
On: Conscientious Objectors
TUESDAY, Nov. 15 4:00 P.M. Aud. D
ERNEST GOODMAN
On: A Basis for Objection -
The Nuremburg Judgment

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KEEP A-HEAD OF YOUR HAIR
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will please you. Try us!
-tonsorial queries invited-
The Dascola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theatre

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 7:30 P.M.

Aud. D

I

Mr. Byrne will be on campus onNovember 18
to discuss positions in the above fields with you.
See your placement office to schedule an appointment.
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111

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