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November 11, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-11

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PAGE TWO

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

. I

PAGE TWO TUE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1966

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1966

Full Text of Recommendations
For Educational Equality at U'

FILMS
'Sundays and Cybele':
Sensitive, Artistic Work

(Continued from Page 1)
tions of the University. Example:
The bulletin of School of Nursing
and the Bulletin on General In-
formation.
(12) All .committees and ap-
pointed groups which develdp Uni-
Versity policy, both on the campus
and cooperatively with outside
activities, should always include
one or lhore .Negroes as voting
and/or advisory members. Merely
the presence of Negroes in a body
discussing and planning policies
will modify the nature of the dis-
cussion and the ultimate final de-
cisions in almost every situation.
(13) A training program for all
iepartment chiefs. -and -leaders
should be established to instruct
and inform attendees about non-
discrimination, the application of
policies and the nature and forms
of . discrimination as it relates to
facilities and services.
(14) The University has a spe-
cial opportunity to demonstrate its
policies and intentions by in-
cluding some Negroes on the Ses-,

quicentennial

Committee.

n o wt

formed for the 1967 celebration.
. (16) Every publication pertain-
ing to admission, housing facil-
ities, services, financial aid and
activities should carry a specific
statement citing the non-discrimi-
nation posture of the University.
(16) The University is reported
both by students and faculty to be
known as a large, highly academic
university basically for "rich white
students." The University should
develop programs to change this
image and to inform the public
that all students with basic, aver-
age ability are welcome and can
be succtssful at the University.
(17) Negro students interviewed
expressed the opinion that broader
recruitment of Negro undergrad-
uate students should be conducted
.n the South, Mid-West, and the
East..
(18) The students stated opin-
ions that the University should
exercise greater influence to ac-
complish more equal employment
opportunities by Ann Arbor busi-
ness and industry.

(19) Students expressed the be-
lief that Negro females are as-
signed primarily to Alice. Lloyd
Hall and none are assigned to
Markley Hall. It was stated that
Negro males are assigned mostly
to the South Quad.
(20) Some faculty members ex-
pressed the opinion that Negro
recruits for graduate programs
might be increased by concentra-
tion on mid-western colleges where
Negroes are usually found and
have been able to survive a four-
year program in competition with
their white peers.
(21) It was suggested that more
minority group students might
enter the University, if more low
cost housing were available. It is
3uggested that housing discrim-
ination in off-campus facilities
could be reduced, if the University
made it mandatory for all under-
graduate students to live only in
University-approved housing.
(22) Special publicity programs
should be, established and executed
in both Detroit and Flint, to at-
tract minority group students to
the campuses at those two urban
centers.
(23) The services of the Uni-
versity should be used to do re-
search on equal employment op-
portunity programs, to train in-
dustrial leaders in this increasing-
ly vital area, and to conduct in-
tensive research on racial aspects
of employment, training and per-
sonnel administration.
(24) Negro students interviewed
were not aware of the broad ex-!
panse of scholarship, grants, loans
and aids that are available on
both the graduate and undergrad-
uate levels. Such information

By CLARENCE FANTO
Managing Editor
There are few films which not
only provide the viewer with a
deep, memorable emotional exper-
ience but also deserve to be treat-
ed as major works of art. The
1962 French film "Sundays and
Cybele" (shown this weekend at
Cinema Two), offers extremely
sensitive insights into the human
condition, and as an artistic ex-
perience may be the finest motion

the film who is able to under-
stand Pierre, who can assuage
his half-remembered fears and
guilts from the past, and who can
offer him an ideal, platonic kind
of love. As her ancient Greek
name would suggest, Cybele is of
another world. She is completely
honest, hides none of her feelings
and offers a perspective on the
world which lacks the open cynic-
ism and bitterness surrounding
Pierre.

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V Ir-A(90

LITTLE CLUB
proudly presents

0

DICK

WINGFI.ELD'

playinC
ethnic

and singing

in the
folk tradi ti ons

picture ever made. Idyllic Relationship
The film, directed by the young. The idyllic relationship between
French director Serge Bourguion- Pierre and Cybele is shattered,
on, deals with the love of a amnes- however, by the lack of under-
iac war veteran for an abandoned standing demonstrated by nearly
12-year-old girl. The tragedy all the adults in Pierre's life ex-
which gradually unfolds through cept his employer and, finally, his
the film is the inability of the mistress, Madeleine.
insensitive people around the war "Sundays and Cybele" can be
veteran, Pierre, to understand the appreciated on many levels of un-
innocence and purity of the love derstanding. As cinematic art, it
relationship between him and the is unparalleled, offering unique
girl. uses of the camera and of musical
Pierre, who suffers from the backgrounds. The director adopt-
guilt of having killed civilians, in- ed what can be described as an
cluding a young child in a bomb- ultra-realistic approach, in all
ing run over Tibet, has failed in sights and sounds are magnified.
his search for his memory, and From the standpoint of photog-
thus lives in a twilight world of raphy, the film stands as a superb
semi-involvement. His love affair example of courageous, complete-
with his former nurse seems me- ly original employment of the
chanical, devoid of deep senti- craft's technical resources.
ment on his part. He seems to be As an examination of human
in a psychological state halfway emotions and motivation, "Sun-
between life and death. days and Cybele" points out the
Accidental Meeting tragedy of assuming that hap-
Quite by accident, Pierre meets piness must conform to specific,
Cybele, about to be abandoned in "socally acceptable" norms of be-
a Catholic orphanage by her havior.
father. The two stricken indi- Full Range of Emotions

764-0558

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1966
10:15-11:00 P.M.
IN THE
MUG, MICHIGAN UNION
JAZZ COMBO
PLAYING THROUGHOUT THE EVENING

4

Timely'CowboyinAbsentia'
Absorbing, Skkillful Drama

F

By JOAN ALTER/
Dennis McIntyre's 'Cowboy in
Absentia," the 1966 first place'
Hopwood selection, is an absorb-
ing and skillfully developed drama.
The plot is simple: it concerns
the problems of a young Ameri-
can couple when the husband
comes to believe he has an obli-
gation to go to war. To complh-
cate -matters, the war is in Viet;
Nam. And since David; the hus-
band, does not support the ad-
ministration's position, his desire
to fight becomes particularly per-
plexing.
Raised in Montana (hence
"cowboy" in the title) andi
brought up on the conventional
cliches "loyal, trustworthy, pat-.
riotic," David nevertheless realizes
that Montana men are generally
,narrow minded, violent, and vul-
gar." In Montana it is customary
for a young .man to enlist as soon
as he has graduated from college.
If there happens to be a war at
thenioment, no matter what kind'
of war, it is simply his misfortune.
David's brotner has followed the
pattern, "but thus tar David has
abstained because of his wife.
"They draw your version of cour-
age in comic books,"~cries an old
schoolmate when he learns of
David's recent decision.
David's - wife Nancy, as .his
friend Charlie tells him, is affec-
tionate, loyal, and devoted - in
short, the perfect wife. They had
promised to do anything for each
other, but an apparent impasse is
created -by David's recent decision.
It seems that compromise in mar-
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riage must mean total abnega-
tion of one of . the partners:
Nancy's happiness means David
must supress his will, and David's
satisfaction means Nancy must
supress hers.
McIntyre develops this delicate
and intruiging situation through
the series of arguments between
the four characters which com-
prises the action of the plot. Mc-
Intyre's dramatic technique is
flawless. Although the play has
certain characteristics of soap
opera, and although the charac-
ters may largely be considered
stereotypes, the drama is suostan-
tiated by the important and time-
ly issues which it raises.
With its humorous passages, its
extravagance and also seriousness,
the finale of "Cowboy in Absen-
tia', draws no clear cut distinction
between black and white.

I

TONIGHT atĀ£ittV ,
Justin Friedland
will sing
Blue Songs, Red Songs, Pink Songs, Off Color Songs
AND

viduals are brought together by a
search for self-identity through

should be disseminated to them as carefree happiness and
a means to encoureage enrollment sharing of experiences.

joyous

and continuation in school. '
(25) The minimal number of
Negroes on the University faculty
is a detriment to the public image
of the University. We suggest that
special efforts to recruit 3xperi-
eniced Negro lawyers for the Law
School faculty might help the neg-
ative racial situation in that de-
partment. The same suggestion is
valid for the College of Engin-
eering and the School of Business
Adiinist'ation.,

Cybele is played by Patricia
Gozzi in whose performance lies
the miracle of this film. The sen-
sitivity and understanding com-
municated by Miss Gozzi is not
that of a child but of a mature
human being. Herein lies the great
attraction of Cybele's character
for Pierre, who has been con-
fronted by a world of "people
whose faces are masks behind
which they hide."
Cybele is the one character in

The film offers a full range of
emotional expression, from irre-
pressible joy and abandon to
stark tragedy. Finally, on the
deepest level, "Sundays and Cy-
bele" is profoundly symbolic, with
elements of mythology and liter-
ary references cropping up fre-
quently. Appreciation of this facet
of the film is probably limited to
artists and literary buffs, but it
is not necessary to understand the
literary symbolism in order to en-
joy "Sundays and Cybele" as one
of the most meaningful emotional
experiences expressed through a
visual artistic medium.

s

$1,00

LEE PANTAS

8:30

I

will ,singmostly Blue Songs

G103 South Quad

WOW!

Free Food

Discussion of the JOHNSON BACKLASH n IOWA!

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#i' Iel

SABBATH SERVICE
Friday at 7:15 P.M.
DR. JACK WALKER
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Will Discuss
POST-ELECTION REFLECTIONS
Oneg Shabbat and Forum Follows
The Hillel Choir
BARBARA BECKER, guest conductor
JOAN TEMK IN, organist
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION,
1429 Hill Street All Are Welcome

JERRY WILLARD''I:
classical guitarist
and
lute nis t4
will present a program
of4
guitar and lute music
from the
D 11th to 20th centuries-
VADIT, BACH, VILLA-LOBOS, etc.
door open 330 Maynard St. $1.25 per person
at 8:30 p.m. fr%., sat.., sun.

4

- IL

I

Held Over 2nd Week
20th Century-Fox Presents
CHARLTON HESTON
REX HARRISON - .r
in
THE AGONY AND
THE ECSTASY
CosTamng
DIANE CILENTOrr

I

HELD OVER 2nd WEEK'

EM

-TATITTT"bum
(CL-wimu1jaw

DI At
8-64 16

L.

=old

;III

VINk

~LIIH

RIYLHN
DIRECT FROM BROADWAY!
Mon.-Tues.,
Nov. 14 & 15
8:30 P.M.

A

some people
willdo
anythingfor
Feature o
1:20-3:50
6 :30-9 :05

I
i

ame people
will do almost
nything for
noned
10 Presents
mrmmon
maruH
)e's

4
4

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PRESENTS A CARLO PONTI PRODUCTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM OF BORIS PASTERNAKS
DOCOR ZHiAGO
STARRING-
GERALDINE CHAPLIN JULIE CHRISTIE OM COURTENAY
ALFC GUINNFSS - SIOBHAN McKFNNA . RAlPH RICARQR"N

0

1e mIhRISCK C0RPORT1
JACK U~
WaLTeR
BILLY WILE

Hill Auditorium

V

: x }5.. :. ...:4 "Rnlrl lmnninntiva Vivir Dnrinn!"

i

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