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November 06, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAFE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVA ERA 6, 1966

PAFE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6. 1966

SUPPORT WILLIAMS-FERENCY:
StateRaces To

Dearborn Viet Nam Re ferendum
Test Union Power Sparks Community Controversy
port, the nation that he would make endorsed Williams - with re- DEARBORN (;P)-Mayor Orville referendum was removed Monday' Dingell said he favored with-
the best presidential candidate luctance, he says - because of L. Hubbard, who has seldom lost when U.S. District Judge Fred W. drawal of troops *and a negotiated
has in 1968? Griffin's sponsorship of the Lan- a political battle in 25 years as Kaess ruled a suit filed by former settlement "but only under honor-
how !drum-Griffin Act. Imm'nrof thn"TIP,"it."nhnr hae T .q an-u "-rl ?,---a A "' _ '- "

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DETROIT (AP) - A good test
of how much political influence
labor leaders have on the rank
and file in heavily unionized
Michigan could be provided in
the state's two top races next
Tuesday.'
The contests match Republi-
can Gov.. George W. Romney,
seeking . a . third term, against
Democrat Zelton A. Ferency,
and U.S. Sen: Robert P. Griffin,
trying for a full term, against
former Gov. G. Mennen Wil-
liams. Griffin, a five-term con-
gressman, Was appointed by
Romney to succeed the late Pa-
trick McNamara in the Senate.
Labor for Ferency-Williams
Michigan's labor hierarchy is'
unequivocally, and nearlynunan-
imously, behind Ferency-Wil-
liams.
Ticket-splitting, however, is a
tradition in this state and what
labor leaders recommend, and
how the rank and file votes, do
not always correspond.
Williams, who. won six terms

as governor with labor supj
recognizes this.
"It isn't monolithic," he
said. "I think the statistics s
that about one-thigd of the 1
people in Michigan vote Re]

abor
pub-

lican and two-thirds Demo-
cratic."
Expected to Win
Romney is expected to win
easily over Ferency, 44, a labor
lawyer and state Democratic
chairman. The latest polls have
the Williams-Griffin race a tos-
sup.
Although the senatorial con-
test holds the most interest in
Michigan, eyes around the coun-
try are on Romney.
The question never really was
whether he will win, but how
big?
Big enough to boost Griffin to
victory and perhaps help three
or four Republican recapture
congressional seats lost in the
Johnson landslide of 1964?
Big enough to convince GOP
leaders and contributors around

Detroit Vital. Romney claims that he landed
The answer to these questions about 35 per cent of the union
appears to lie in the industrial- vote in 1962, when he first ran
ized, and unionized, Detroit area. for governor. In 1964, he says,
Traditionally, a Republican can- 48 per cent voted for him and
didate has needed at least 35 this year "surveys indicate that
per cent of the vote here, plus 82 per cent - that's right - 82
a good margin out-state. per cent of union members ap-
Led by Walter P.. Reuther, prove of the job this administra-
president of the United Auto tion is doing."
Workers, and Auguste Scholle, Romney has brushed aside all
president of the state AFL-CIO, questions about possible presi-
union spokesman have been bit- dential ambitions, but he re-
terly critical of Romney and cently said he didn't think it fair
Griffin. The governor has been that his standing in the party
attacked for what labor calls his might depend on what happens
probusiness attitude; Griffin for in Michigan reces other than his
his part in authoring the Lan- own.

drum-Griffin Labor Act that
regulates some union activities.
Hoffa for Romney
The only major labor figure in
Detroit who is backing Romney
is James P. Hoffa, president of
the Teamsters Union. But Hoffa

. The governor has devoted
more than half his time to stump-
ing for Griffin and the rest of
the GOP ticket, unlike 1964,
when he refused to campaign
for or endorse presidential can-
didate Barry Goldwater.

ciadyoz 01 Lnls lJeLio2L suaura nas I v.b. rep. rlarola hyan a mien-

made the Viet Nam war an issueI
in the Nov. 8 general election.
Dearborn voters will become the
first in the nation to be asked by
ballot: "Are you in favor of an
immediate cease fire and with-
drawal of U.S. troops from Viet
Nam so the Vietnamese people
can settle their own problems?"
No Legal Status
The vote, an advisory question,
has no legal status, but it bears
the unmistakable mark of Hub-
bard, who opposes U.S. involve-
ment in Viet Nam.t
"I think the war is illegal,"
Hubbard has said. "If I were a
young fellow, I certainly wouldn't
go to Viet Nam. I'd rather spend
three years on a rock pile than
to fight some poor little barefoot
guys who have never done any-
thing to us."
It has caused bitter debate, one
law suit and moved the Detroit
News to comment editorially:
"If the result vote is 'Yes,'
Hanoi will know the infamous
LBJ is leading Americans into a
war they don't want. If 'No,' it
demonstrates Americans m u s t
hang on to save Viet Nam from
the Viet Cong."
The last legal block facing the
Ii
Weign auz

igan Democrat, was not within
the court's jurisdiction.
Sought To Prevent Vote
Ryan sought to prevent the vote.
He contended the question inter-
feres with President Johnson's ac-
tions as commander of U.S. armed
forces. He also had charged it
would furnish the Communist re-
gime in North Viet Nam with
propaganda material.
U.S. Rep. John Dingell (D-
Mich.), who represents Dearborn,
calls the question ambiguous, say-
ing: ''The referendum really
doesn't give the people of this
district a fair choice in deciding
what direction their nation will
take.
"Are you going to permit the
first armed threat of the Com-
munists since World War II to go
unopposed?" Dingell recently ask-
ed a Dearborn audience.
Maverick Republican
Hubbard, a self-described "mav-
erick Republican," shared the ros-
trum at the meeting, and retorted:
"He (Dingell) hasn't got the
courage to go back to Washing-
ton and submit a bill asking Con-
gress to declare war. Congress
hasn't had the courage to do it,
and neither has Dingell."
DIAL 5-6290
IlPEE cHEAS FO/AFUNN/FL/

able circumstances.
"This war should be the first Shown
order of business," replied Hub- 9:10 Only
bard. "We should either win it or
get out." Also-
Dingell's Republican opponent
in next Tuesday's election is John Ursula
T. Dempsey, a political science! Andress
professor at the University's Dear-' shown
born branch. Dempsey said the! at
ballot question does not "clearly ol
assert the real complexities of the: IS
choice which faces this country." PlusRO
He termed the question "too dove- co
like.''1
some people will do anything forw
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McNamara Predicts
Cut in Viet Draft Call'

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(Continued from Page 1)
pet number of their troops in the
past three .months.
(At the -beginning of the year,
U.S. intelligence figures placed the
number of enemy troops in South
Viet Nam at roughly 250,000. That.
number climbed steadily, as it had
since the North Vietnamese step-
ped up their infiltration in 1964,
to about 280,000 by July 30.)
McNamara reported these major
decisions-"b a r r i n g -unforeseen
contingencies"-on the shape and
impact of the war next year:
"Draft calls will be lower for
1967 than they have been for 1966.
It is now apparent that the total
number to be called during '.the
next four months will be signifi-
cantly smaller-perhaps no more
than half as many-than the
161,000 called .in the four months
of August through November."
"A slowdown in our rate of de-
ployment is planned . . . .The in-
crease in U.S. forces in South Viet
Nam will be 'substantially less than
this year."
McNamara said American forces
will have been increased by about
200,000 men by the end of the cur-
rent year. "The increase next year
will be nothing on that order."
"Here at home we have already
ordered a cut of $1 billion in the
planned annual rate of production
of air ordinance, and today I have
discussed with the President the
probability of a second cut."
Mcamara said the United States
had more than 140,000 tons of
bombs and other aerial weapons in
Southeast Asia, with 140,000 more
tons on the way.
"I expect that this same trend
toward stabilization will govern
our deployments of air units to
Southeast Asia and the level of
our air activities."
McNamara added that "no
sharp increases" in U.S. air action
over North Viet Nam are planned
for next year.
He said the current rate of at-

tack-about 25,000 sorties a :month
-is taking its toll in material and
morale in North Viet Nam. A sor-
tie is one flight by one plane.
But in Tokyo, William P. Bundy,
U.S. assistant secretary of state
Far Eastern affairs, was Neported
to have told Japanese government
officials that the U.S. may step
up bombing of North Viet Nam.
Bundy was said to have told of-
ficials that intensification of the
air war would depend on North
Viet am's future actions. Bundy
went to Tokyo to brief Japanese
officals on the Manila conference.
"I expect that this trend toward
stabilization . Will govern our air
operations, and the deployments
of air units to South Viet Nam,
and the level of our air attacks,"
McNamara told newsmen.

2 Kosher Corned
Beef or Pastrami
Members $1 .00

Sandwiches
Others $1.25

T AE

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lit 4boeittia
A Premiere Production
by Dennis McIntyre
Presented by
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
-Dept. of Speech
in cooperation with
THE DEPT. of ENGLISH
Wednesday-
Saturday
Nov. 9-12, 1966
Trueblood
Aud.
8 p.m.

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