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October 11, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-11

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. OCTOBER 11- 1499

TilE MICHIGAN DAILY TTIFgflAV flE'~TAUI'1~ 11 1on~

A villo"rii. %jt. 1VDL'" 11. 1.7 0

i

Education School Must Beg Classrooms,
Borrow Offices To Accommodate Needs

Sensational Pianist Novaes
To Charm Audience at Hill

t3E----_ _

(Continued from Page 1)
Walk into one classr om and
footsteps ring loudly. Lehmann
claps his hands and one's ears
resound. "The acoustics in this
room are terrible." A number of
rooms are like that, but one with
acoustical treatment is much bet-
ter. They could all have acoustical
treatment-if the money was
available.
Lehmann opens another door
and says "We need this classroom
for 60 students."
"But it doesn't hold 60" one d.s-
covers. s
"I know"
Upstairs are more offices, mostly
cut-up classrooms. The addition
of paneling has enabled some of
these to be neatly divided. "We
like this office," says one secretary,
fearing some calamitous change.
Down' the street from University
school is a house on the corner of
East University and South Uni-
Versity. It houses a kitchen-home-
making class for University High
school on the first floor, and
teaching fellows offices on the top
two.
It may be the only University
building with a bath tub on every
floor of offices. No one has an of-
fice in a bath tub yet, but an old
janitor's closet has been converted
int an office.
Lehmann says he warns every-
one who uses the building to have
two copies of all records kept
there. He worries about the build-
ing going up in smoke, and is glad
the fireplace doesn't work.
At present, the education school
runs. University School from kin-
dergarten through grade 12. The
school decided several years ago
to phase out grades 10, 11 and 12
wklen Iuron High School is com-
pleted by the city.
All this was originally planned
to take place in the fall of 1967,
but because of the delay in con-
structing the new high school the
Regents agreed to keep the upper
three grades until fall 1968.
The move will free only from
four to six classes for the educa-
tion school; and, especially if the
addition does not come through,
a . ecision could be made as to
whether to continue the rest of
University School.
.When asked if the educaon
school'might drop grades seven,
eight, and nine in addition to the
others, Lehmann says the possi-
bili exists. The remaining elemen-
tary school grades are cheaper to
support, and, Lehmann indicates,
lend themselves more to experi-
mentation. However, it is possible
thatthese grades could be dropped
also.
The education school's report
ftr:1965-66 notes "29 research or
experimental projects utilized the
resources of University School"
that year, and in addition, "the
school was frequently called upon"
ORGAN IZATION
.NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognised and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
n *Room 1011 SAB.
Baptist Student Union, Devotional,
Oct. 11, 4:30 p.m., Conf. Room No. 1,
League.
University of Michigan Dames, Gen-
eral meeting, Oct. 12, 8 p.m., Inter-
national Center, 603 E. Madison.
Baha'i Student Group, Informal dis-
cussion, Fri., Oct. 14, 8 p.m., 335 E.
Huron, Apt. 5. All welcome.
-Guild House, Tuesday noon luncheon
discussion on "Radical Theology," spon-
sored by Office of Religious Affairs,
Oct. 11, 12-1 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
University Committee on Standards
and Conduct, Petitioning through Oct.

17, petitions available in SGC office
and Room 1011 SAB. All students of at
least junior standing eligible to peti-
tion.

to aid in research projects of those
outside the school.
The report also notes that the
school's educational researcn com-
mittee had encountered "lack of
space for all activities" and found
that "a reasonable increase in re-
search activities probably will not
occur within the present space
limitations and optimum use can-
not be made of expanded federal
sources of funds for research."
In another area of the report,
it is noted that the library and in-
structional materials committee
spent many meetings "discussing
problems of instruction within the
school. At times these meetings
provoked a sense of frustration.

"This was shared by all for it'
is. recognized that there are seri-
ous, urgent problems that can be
eliminated only by the provision
of adequate space and budget."
Since the building of University
School in 1929, the education
school has only gained space in
two old buildings and a rented
floor of temporary offices. Faculty
and administrators, especially if
their offices face on the school's
courtyard, do not like mixing their
offices in the often noisy school
surroundings.
Inadequate teaching and re-
search facilities hurt progress in
these areas and the school's repu-
tation, those in the school believe.

Planning lasting solutions to
space problems has become an
"exercise in futility" says Leh-
mann. "Hundreds of hours of
planning" have gone into perna-
nent solutions that were never
used, and the school's planners are
not anxious for more fruitless
tasks.
At the moment the education
school looks forward to getting its
addition and possibly moving into
the architecture building when the
architecture school moves to North
Campus in a few years.
The education school has dis-
covered it's just not high enough
on the priority lists to get some-
thing new, says Lehmann.

Guimar Novaes will give the sec-
ond concert in the Choral Union
Series at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Hill Auditorium.
The program will be: Melodie,
from "Orfeo" and Let air de ballet,'
from "Alceste" by Gluck; "Sonata'
No. 17 in D minor, Op. 21, No. 2"'
by Beethoven; "Papillons, Op. 2"
by Schumann; and "Preludes" by
Chopin.
Known throughout four conti-
nents as one of the foremost wo-
men pianists of our time, Guimar
Novaes is a native of Brazil. Stu-
dying with Chiafarelli, she first
became famous throughout South
America as a pianist and compos-
er while still a child and was sent

by the Brazilian government for
further study at the famous Paril
Conservatoire.
Auditioning there for one of on-
ly two places available to 389 for-
eigner competitors, she won the
unanimous vote of a panel of
judges which included Debussy,
Faure and Moskowski, and after
studying for two years with Isodor
Philipp and his assistant, Helen
Chaumont, was awarded the co-
veted First Prize of the Conserva-
toire.
A recently published letter of
Debussy, describing the Novaes'
Conservatoire audition, says, 'She
has all the qualities for a great
artist . . . the power of complete
inner concentration, which is a
characteristic so rare in artists.
Novaes' sensational debuts in
Paris and London three years after
this letter was written launched a
career that has been marked by
fabulous successes ever since. She
has been decorated by the French
government and has received nu-
merous honors in her own country,
including the Prize of Merit of
Brazil.
Tickets are available at all prices
at the University Musical Society
office in Burton Tower.

University of Michigan Bands
Presents
The Third Annual
Prices:--$1 .00 and $1.50
BA ND-O-RAMA
Featuring the Symphony,
Concert, Marching, and Jazz Bands
Friday, October 14-8:30 P.M.
AT HILL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT THE
HILL AUDITORIUM BOX OFFICE
All seats reserved

4

L

FREE 'U' ENDORSED:
NVational Teacher Corps Appropriations
Slashed Drastically by House Committee

I L,

Subscribe To

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Collegiate Press Service
The National Teacher Corps will
meet an untimely death on June
30, 1967-a victim of Congressional
apathy and Congresswoman Edith
Green's hostility.
This outcomed was almost as-
sured recently when the Senate
Appropriations Committee cut the
Corps' budget request to $7.5 mil-
lion - just enough to carry it
through the 1966 fiscal year.
In April, the House Appropria-
tiois Committee denied the Corps'
entire budget request for its 'acti-
vities.
The Senate move was a setback

for the Johnson Administration's
efforts to combat teacher short-
ages and sub-standard education
in slum areas. The Corps has had
rough going in Congress since its
establishment under the 1965
Higher Education Act and has op-
erated under supplementary bud-
get funds since its founding.
The Corps provides for the
training of college graduates in
special teaching techniques to
serve in slum areas. The program
was designed by the Administra-
tion to attract the youthful ideal-
ism often claimed for Peace Corps
and Vista recruits.

After receiving their training, to Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-
Corpsmen teach in slum areas and Wis.), a strong supporter of th
supplement the regular school cur- Corps. The teachers in the pro.
riculum by offering students re- gram are all college graduates, un-
medial reading, language (proper dergo extensive training, and ar
English) laboratories, and cultur- well-prepared to teach," he said
al tours. But the opposition of Edith
For their efforts, Corpsmen re- Green did not in itself kill the
ceive the same salaries as local funds for the Corps. The program
teachers and pursue government- has met with little enthusiasm
paid Master's degree programs to among voters and Congressmen
earn teacher certificates. Travel and legislators have been unwill-
funds are given to Corpsmen for ing to raise domestic expenditures
the expenses of attending train- while the Viet Nam war continues
ing centers, and they are paid $75 and inflation threatens the econo.
a week during summer training. my.
The compensation the Corpsmen The mood was glum at the Tea-
receive has brought strong opposi- cher Corps office after the Senate
tion from Representative Green, a vote, as officials worried about the
key figure in shaping most educa- effect of the budget cut on pros-
tional legislation. The Oregon pective Corpsmen. For the past
Congresswoman has argued that few weeks, Corpsmen, who were
the financial benefits received by expecting regular school salaries
Corpsmen, combined with the spe- and an opportunity to put three
cial attention and reduced teach- months' training into practice,
ing loads they receive, discrimi- have been volunteering for com-
nates against local school teachers munity projects.
and lowers morale at their schocls. Out of 1270 interns scheduled
The inexperienced Corpsmen, for this school year, 1012 remain-
she adds, might lower teaching ed with the program despite the
standards at the schools where uncertain prospects of the budget
they are assigned. request and the availability of
"Ridiculous," according to aide other jobs.
I.-

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3.
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4

. .... _

- .-- ill

Griffin Leads in News Poll

DETROIT ((A))-Democratic se-
natorial candidate G., Mennen
Williams has slipped two percent-
age points and continues to trail
his Republican opponent, Sen. Ro-
bert P. Griffin, according to a
copyrighted poll published yester-
day by the Detroit News.
The poll indicated Griffin gain-
ed 2 percent in heavily Democratic
Wayne County during zhe last
month while Williams lost 3 per-
cent, cutting the former governor's
lead in the county to 60-38.
The remainder of the state gave
Griffin a 57-39 percent lead. The
Republican senator lost 1 percent
outstate and Williams 2 percent
while the undecided vote rose ac-
cordingly.
Williams showed his largest
gains among home renters, up
from 58 to 67 percent. He also
made headway with the 21 to, 29

year old group, boosting his per-
centage from 45 to 52 percent.
Among service workers and labor-
ers, his percentage rose from 52
to 67 percent.
Griffin's greatest gains were
among the foreign born, up from
39 to 41 percent; home owners, up
from 52 to 54 percent; 40 to 49
year olds, up from 47 to 51 per-
cent; professional and kindred
workers, up from 62 to 78 percent,
and managers, officials and busi-
ness owners, up from 52 to 65 per-
cent.
Among union member voters,
Williams held firm at 66 percent,
the same as in the last poll, but
dropped 2 percent, from 38 to 36,
among nonunion voters.
Griffin dropped 1 percent among
union members, from 32 to 31, and
held steady at 61 percent among
nonunion members.

X;

Lead the.
Great Men
of the World..
Aroun6 the U of M Campus
STUDENT
SESQUICENTENNIAL
ESCORT
SERVICE
Sign up for interviews
9-5 daily
Oct. 10-1 7
in the Student Offices
- ichigan Union

4

DIAL
8-6416

9 1 b
lit Tjjj I WDAW

3rd & Final Week
ENDS
WEDNESDAY

"A truly adult love story!
It is a beautiful film,
finely made!"
-Judith Cnst. N. Y. Herald Tribune
Starts Thursday: "MORGAN": Howlingly Funny!

p

I

:.. .

ULLR
SKI CLUB
MASS MEETING
TONIGHT, Oct. 11
Union Ballroom-7:30
* slides of our activities
" refreshments
" skiing every weekend
" vacation trips to Colorado and Vermont

DIAL
5-6290

Shows at 1,
L'J-1LAN'.I3,5,7,9 P.M.

L

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SUBSCRIPTIONS NOW ON SALE!

F'

Beyond H. G. Wells and Jules
Verne-an adventure totally

new and totally

unexpected!

i

r

A efAe
AW

Have you been searching for a

11

Phone 482-2056
nteaice On CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
GRAMMEY COMPANY *ma
CARY GRANT
SAMANTHA G4AR
Snown at 7;10-11 00 E l
ACtuhJI p*cTURE8REL
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as well as fine food?
THEN TRY
JiE GOLDEN FALCON
Daily Serving
LUNCHES and DINNERS
There is also the
"GOLDEN HOUR "-COCKTAILS

ENDS TONIGHT
"The Gospel, According
to St. Matthew"
Dial 2-6264
TOMORROW!
cheeky young
American
defies the
deadly
Mr. Dominion ~;:
to save
kinky
London
ingenue! r

A

Shown A& 9:25 I

v

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111

I

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