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September 23, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-23

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PAGE-. TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 23, 1966

PM~t TWO' FIlE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1966

Chamber Symphony Will Debut RICHARD WILT:
With Twin Premiere Tomorrow Pf
"' 1,dh

or Shows Work
the Art Gallery

4 . QW-1k,
0-1

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
announces

IU'i 1 Il9

By JOHN NOLAND
America's first permanent cham-
ber orchestra-the Chamber Sym-
phony of Philadelphia-will ini-
tiate its Gala Inaugural Tour to-
morrow evening at 8:30 in Rack
ham Auditorium.
Opening the University Musical
Society's eighty-eighth concert
season with its U.S. debut, the
Chamber Symphony will perform
the first reading of the "Concerto
for Chamber Orchestra, a new
composition by Benjamin Lees. It

is expected that the composer him-
self will come from New York for
this world premiere.
Under the leadership of Anshel
Brusilow the Chamber Symphony's
thirty-six musicians will also play
the Vivaldi "Concerto in G Ma-
jor," and Cherubini's "Symphony
in D Major." Soloists on the pro-
gram will include Louis Opalesky,
who will play the "Trumpet Vol-
untary" by Jeremia Clarke.
Brusilow, a brilliant violinist
and concertmaster of the Phila-
delphia Orchestra for years. has

c o n d u c t e d major symphonies
throughout the continent. In ex-
changing his bow for the baton. he
follows in the tradition of such
renowned violinist-conductors as
Monteau, Kleiber, and Munch.
The Chamber Symphony itself
is approximately one-third the
size of a regular symphony or-
chestra. Nevertheless, with its full
complement of strings, woodwinds,
brass and percussion, it can pre-
sent the widest possible variety of
repertoire. This fact enables it as
a group to include masterpieces of
the baroque and romantic periods
as well as compositions by con-
temporary composers.
The Chamber Symphony of
Philadelphia is scheduled for 22
concerts this season in Philadel-
phia and seven in New York, ter-
minating in a tour of the U.S. and
Canada.
It seems quite evident that our
own concert series will be one of
the most memorable, indeed, with
the opening presentation of a!
double premiere.

By STEVE RUDDELL panels painted in 1962-63 exem-
The Forsythe Gallery in the plify this i&roductive period.
Nickels Arcade, which features Though Wilt's paintings have
contemporary, professional artiststi
from around the world, is present- brilliant color studies. there is al-
ly exhibiting the latest works of ways a masterful underlying draw-
Richard Wilt. Wilt, a professor at ing structure. An exceptionally
.i t.e fine drawer. Wilt has built up his
the University, has had severalpanng veasnstelnar
other shows at the Forsythe. The paintings over a sensitive linear
r foundation. His subject matter,
current exhibition features his frequently young children, is de-
latest oils but also includes some fined by smooth. graceful lines
earlier works. Drawings from as which are often geometrical in
early as 1949 are placed next to construction. This combination of
the more contemporary paintings a linear foromation and translu-
to show the development of the cent, livid color patterns is syn-
completed piece. thesized into a unified, total de-

YOM KIPPUR SERVICES
in Rackham Lecture Hall-Auditorium
THIS EVENING: Friday, September 23, 7:30 P.M.-KOL NIDRE
Cantor: Mike Gellis, assisted by Hillel Choir
Addlress: ". . That We May Search Our Ways"
Professor Philip J. Elving
Saturday, September 24, 9:00 A.M.
YIZKOR (Memorial Service) 11:30 A.M.
Reform Students are welcome as usual to worship with Hillel--or may attend the Service of
Temple Beth Emeth Friday at 8:15 P.M. and Saturday at 10 A.M. at 1917 Washtonaw Ave.

4

New Code To Label Movies
For Mature Audiences'

4

NEW YORK (R) - The motion
picture industry hasp a new set of
production guidelines, eliminating:
many specific taboos, but giving
Hollywood's Production Code Ad-
ministration, for the first time, the
power to label certain films 'rec-
commended for mature audien-:
ces."
The new code, in effect, gives
filmmakers more leeway in treat-
ing sex, sin and violence, but also
gives production code officials
more flexibility in deciding what
will get its "seal of approval."
According to Jack Valenti, new
head of the Motion Picture Asso-
ciation of America, the use of the
"mature audience" tag says, basic-
ally. "Look, Mr. Parent, this may
not be a picture you want your
child to see."
Announced Tuesday
Valenti, former special assistant
to President Johnson, announced
the adoption of the revised pro-
duction code at a news conference'
Tuesday,
The Production Code Adminis-
tration, now headed by Geoffrey
M. Shurlock, provides the rules on
film content and treatment for
the guidance of the major Ameri-
can film companies. All subscribe
to the code, but are not legally
bound to abide by it.
The original code was adopted
in 1930 and, because of changing
times and changing morals, has
been revised several times.

However, in recent years, the
industry has been under increas-
ing criticism as it has produced
films more daring in content and
treatment. Critics threatened cen-
sorship, local and federal. '
Film producers, at the same
time, cried for more leeway to
treat more mature material, es-
pecially to counter the more dar-
ing foreign film fare.
Revision of the code became the
No. 1 chore of Valenti when he
was named head of the MPAA
last April.,
Two Objectives
The result was the new code
which, Valenti said, has two main
objectives: to "encourage artistic
expression by " expanding creative
freedom" and "to assure that the
freedom that encourages the artist
remains responsible and sensitive
to the standards of the larger so-
ciety."
"This is self-restraint, self-reg-
ulation and self-discipline. We
want to make clear that expansion
of the artist's freedom doesn't
mean tolerance of license," Valenti
said.
Louis Nizer, MPAA attorney,
said, "the standards of reasonable
men will be applied to the inter-
pretation of the new code."
The revised code also establish-
es a motion picture code board to
hear appeals by producers when a
film is denied a seal.

In 1960 Wilt spent six months inG
Antigua in the British West Indies
where he fully developed his tech-
nique of controlled pouring. Many
oils and watercolors were .produced
during this creative period char-
acterized by lavish colors poured
and brushed in complex patterns
that capture the bizarre tropical
flora of Antigua. Several large

sign of unusual impact.!
At times Wilt's paintings give
the impression of wild hallucina-
tory images. For example, Sleeping
Girl on Rug with Plant and Pillow
pictures a young, girl curled up on
a rug with one eye open. Above
and over her is a fantastic plant
whose stems and blossoms erupt
into vivid arabesques. Though his
titles always refer to the material

aig -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

I'I A cross
± 4
FRIDAY, SEPT. 23
7 and 9:45 p.m.-Cinema Guild:
D. W. Griffith's "The Birth of a
Nation" in the Architecture Aud-
itorium.
8 p.m.-The Professional The-
atre Program presents the APA
Repertory Company in Sheridau's
"School for Scandal" in the Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 24
8 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
tre Program presents the APA Re-,
pertoroy Company in Sheridan's
"School for Scandal" in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m. -- The University Mu-
sical Society Chamber Arts Ser-
ies presents the Chamber Sym-
phony of Philadelphia with An-

and the particular, his images
seem to point to the immaterial
Canmpus I and illusory.
'Wilt's work is not without its
social commentary as seen in Play
Dead, Fourth of July, and The
shel Brusilow conducting in the Cannon. The last of these shows
Rackham Auditorium, two boys playing on a large, geo-
8:30 p.m.-The University Mu- metrical cannon. The innocence of
sical Society Chamber Arts Ser- their play juxtaposed against the
ies presents the Chamber Sym- anxiety of the color patterns is
phony of Philadelphia with An- both expressive and powerful in its
shel Brusilow conducting in -he effect.
Rackham Auditori .The present exhibition closes.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 25 September 29. The next presenta-
2:30 and 8 p.m.--The Profes- tion of the Forsythe will be an ex-s
sional Theatre Program presents hibition of the recent drawings
the APA Repertory Company in and paintings by Ted Ramsay
Sheridan's "School for Scandal" which opens October 2. The gal-
in the Lydia Mendelssohn The- ierycis open weekdays 1-4 and
atre. Saturday 10ek-1.a
8 p.m.-The Professional The-
atre Program presents the APA
Repertory Company in Sheridan's PH413-46L80
"School for Scandal" in the Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre.

TWO DIFFERENT WORLDS
at 'm~itye

EAST
Sa leem
Jehangir
from
PAKISTAN
singing
lots of songs
in cooperation
with UAC

OPEN
TON IGHT
'8:30
FREE FOOD
G103
South Quad

WEST
Dave Arch
John Miller
playing
their own
brand of
JAZZ

wV

'-'S

I I

Friday, September 23,
"THE CHICAGO STRUGGLE: A
PROBLEM OF COMMUNICATION"
MR. JAMES STRICKLAND,
Urban League, Chicago
THE PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenaw
6:30-Dinner 7:15-Program
Dinner reservations appreciated-662-3580

I

NOW DIAL
( , E . -8-641I6
"Astonishingly frank! An unabashed look at real-life sex.
Remarkably uninhibited and specific in its recording of
the way lovers talk and touch and think!"
-Richard Schnickel, Life Magazine
"A tender and lusty study of love. 'Dear John' is a tour de
force of erotic realism. Lovemaking banter . . . as explicit
as the law allows!" -Time Magazine
'A truly adult love story!
ft Is a beautiful film,
finely made!"
-JudithCrist N.Y.Herafd Tribune Z A 11Rig m
/"

\.aR0ECARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
Show~n at 7:10 & 10:40c
WILL .Rs fE ay
ET S KILL
UNCLE"
TECHNICOLOR
NIGEL GREEN
0" IcR'$S illFAME! MA
Also Shown at 9:00 Only
RcMDON MURRAYM~X
GUY STOCKWELL:ABBY DALTON
THE
:ivsmh nCOLOR
PLUS: "COWBOY'S HOLIDAY"
2 Color Cartoons

Ic

77~

I

Ii

w.!

OKAY

OKAY!

We'll Hold
It Over!

i

r

ps

wo"O MrMw

woolum r

ft i

I

~7llTBBUI( iOUSB
presents.
GORDON LIGHTFOOT
recording for United Artists Records,
composer of "Spin, Spin, Spin," "That's What You Get for Lovin' Meg" et al
blow your mind!
no reservations, please
fri., sot., sun 8:30 p.m. $1.25 per person.

Ail

The Dave Brubeck Quartet

"A delight!
Witty, airic,
with a
marvelous
assortment z"
of actors!"
e -Cue Magazine
COLUMBIA PICTURES
BRYAN FRBE s.4
PRODUCTION DF
THE'WR'NG BOX
JOHN MILLS*-RALPH RICHARDS( V
MICHAEL CAINE
PETER COOK-DUDLEY MOORE.NANETTE NEWMAN
TONY HANCOCK. PETER SELLERS
n t Or. Pratt

IN CONCERT

I

Presented by the Student Sesquicentennial'Committee
and The Women's Athletic Association
FRIDAY, SEPT. 30

i

8:30 P.M.

Hill Auditorium

Tickets: $3, $2.50, & $2.
Box office open 10 A.M.-4:30 P.M.-Sept. 26-30
7 P.M. night of performance
Block Ticket orders due today at SGC Office, SAB

'
IG
^

DAVE BRUBECK

I

I

i

E '""

& . .. ---- - - - -, I

(zJ±MICHG

DIAL
5.6240

I

THIS WEEK

I

!NEXT WEEK!

I

I

i

I

ENDS TONIGHT
Dial 662-6264

CAT ON A HOT
TIN ROOF
Elizabeth Taylor
Paul Newman
Elizabeth Taylor
Laurence Harvey
Eddie Fisher
BUTTERFIELD 8

4

TOMORROW!

The motion picture with
the FEAR FLASHER and
/g the HORROR H(

,'"

U auivisual ::

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