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September 16, 1966 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-16

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ERIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

fRDAY..S. EBR1.16 E MPGa E

Y

US.-Chinese

Diplomacy:

Short

Cut

to

Peace?

NEW YORK (M-)-The "longest
game in modern history may have
established floating" diplomatic
averted war between the United
States and Communist China and
may yet provide the scene for a
meeting of minds, says a former
U.S. ambassador who once con-
ducted negotiations with the Chi-
nese Communists.
For 11 years, through 130 se-
cret formal sessions and other in-
formal ones, U.S. and Communist
Chinese have met, first in Gene-
va and then in Warsaw, in what
were largely ritual sessions of
cold hostility.

Kenneth T. Young, deputy U.S.
representative to talks which
brought about the truce in Korea,
finds the meetings significant,
especially in providing a channel
"for reducing miscalculations."
Young presents his views in a
comprehensive accounts of the
U.S. - Communist Chinese talks,
published in the current issue of
Foreign Affairs, quarterly of the
Council on Foreign Relations.
"When a crisis seemed to be
building up over Laos in 1961,"
Young writes, "President Kennedy
reportedly used the ambassadorial
channel in Warsaw to warn that

the United States would be com-
pelled to intervene militarily,
however unwillingly, if a cease-
fire did not precede the opening
of negotiations in Geneva.
"Peking informed Washington
via the Warsaw channel that it
was serious about wishing to ne-
gotiate rather than fight and
that it hoped that the United
States would cooperate in work-
ing out an acceptable agreement
for the neutralization of tne
country. By preventing a serious
miscalculation, Peking's notifi-
cation averted a potential military
clash and helped to assure tne

diplomatic alternative of the Ge-
neva conference of 1962 on Laos."
Young cites another instance of
the long-range effects of the
tenuous Peking-Washington con-
tact. This was during the For-
mosa Strait crisis of 1958, when
"the United States assembled the
most powerful striking force in
history and at the same time tried
strenuously in the ambassadorial
talks to negotiate a new staius
for the offshore islands."
This had several results, Young
says. A much greater U.S. mili-
tary presence emerged in East
Asia than might otherwise have

been the case.
Rut the talks also contributed to
the estrangement of Peking and
Moscow: "Peking made the bitter
discovery that its ally put limits
on challenging Washington re-
garding Peking's national 'irren-
denta' unredeemed territories.
Partially in retaliation against
ally and enemyalike, Communist
China is now uncompromisingly
hostile to both and prevents ne-
gotiation with either."
According to Young, Washing-
ton has used Warsaw talks to ex-
pound a plan for political settle-
ment in Viet Nam based on the

1954 Geneva agreements. This in-
volves mutual de-escalation of
military operations as a prelude
to talks. China remains intract-
able.
The net result of 11 years of
talks is that "the gap between the
two governments is growing and
the prospects for closer contacts
seem remote," Young writes.
Nevertheless, Young says, the
contact has given Washington
more continuous diplomatic con-
tact and diversified dialogue with
Peking than any other non-Com-
munist western government has.
switchboard for the U.S. president

to talk to Peking and vice versa,
and a device for exchanging views'
on such critical issues as Viet
Nam and Formosa.
He concludes: "If we persist
long enough in our 'sit-in,' it
might some day become a place
for a meeting of minds, not just
of men, to explore such critical
tasks as a guaranteed settlement
for Southeast Asia, nuclear con-
trol, the internal requirements of
China, the regulation of the Tai-
wan-Formosa Strait problem in all
its aspects and the evolution of
the triangular relations between
Peking, Moscow and Washington."

Red Guards

Stage Mass X
Peking Rally
Crowd of Million
Gathers in Plaza,
Told To End Revolt
TOKYO (RP)-Communist China's
leaders Yesterday decreed a tem-
porary halt to the month-long
rampage of the young Red Guards
and urged them to heln bring in
the harvest. The orders were is-
sued during a mass rally in Pe-
king that amounted to a farewell
party.1
Under. the gaze of party Chair-
man Mao Tze-tung, Defense Min-
ister Lin Piao who is Mao's heir
apparent, and Premier Chou En-
lai about a million Red Guards
and soldiers jammed into the
Plaza of Heavenly Peace, Japa-
nese correspondents in Peking re-
ported.
The official New China News
Agency said many Red Guards al-
ready had scattered to the coun-
tryside in many parts of China
to help the peasants with the
autumn harvest.
An article in the People's Daily
did not make clear whether the
Red Guards, whose violenc'e for a
time created turmoil and fightingt
in China, would be allowed to re-
sume their revolutionary drive1
later.1
"Under no circumstances must
production , be allowed to slow
down," People's Daily said. "Dur-
ing the busy fall harvesting sea-.
son, you may cease your revolu-
tionary activities."E
The paper said the Red Guards1
should learn from the peasants
and laborers of China. Sayingt
that there was no need for RedE
Guards to try to "instill theirt
revolutionary zeal" in factories or
farms, People's Daily declaredf
workers and farmers are "carry-
ing out revlutionary activities of
their own."
This may have been a rebuke.
Various reports of clashes be-
tween Red Guards and other Chi-}
nese throughout China have said1
the workers were in the forefront
of the resistance. There also have
been clashes between farners andE
Red Guards, according to these
reports.
While they have been admon-
ished to desist from revolutionary
activity, at least until the har-
vest is in, the rally under the
high auspices of Mao and De-
fense Minister Lin showed the

ISmthSays APPEARS DOOME
Acceptance Civil Righ
Improbable Reprieved
L d A tiif 44 .V. ,Il 1T\- .

ts Housing Bill
Until Monday

r.

COMMAND PILOT Charles Cor
out of his rubber rescue raft in
of Conrad and his space twin, l
three-day Gemini 11 mission.
3 DAYS IN SPACE
Conrad,C
Gemini 11
ABOARD USS GUAM (P) -
Glinting in the tropical sun,
Gemini 11 guided its proud pilots
to a breathtaking, bull's eye land-
ing yesterday in the Atlantic,
home safe and sound from three
historic days in space.
The band played. The sun
shone. Navy Cmdr. Charles Con-
rad r. and Lt. Cmdr. Richard F.
Gordon Jr. strode briskly, arms
swinging, across the ship's deck,
holders of seven space records.
They let it be known they were
thrilled. Gordon, America's new-
est spacewalker, came home with
this declaration of earth after
their ride to a record altitude of
850 miles: "Boy, it's really round.
Records Set
-The Gemini 11 astronauts set'
these records on their three-day
flight:

-- Latusf-ltiiate WASHINGTON ('P)-President F
Rhodesian Refusal Johnson's open housing civil the
rights bill, apparently doomed by an
Of British Demands the Senate, got a reprieve until to
Monday. to
LONDON 6P) - Commonwealth It came yesterday in a second tw
leaders last night wound up 10 petition to shut off Senate talk ba
lays of angry talks expecting Rho- and force action on the bill tne th
Iadesia's rebel rulers will reject Bri- House approved Aug. 9.
ta: i's call for surrender. To do this would take a two- 7
Ian Smith, prime minister of thirds vote, and even the men ed
the breakaway colony, reported who sponsored the move ackiowl- th
-Associated Press from Salisbury they may be right. edged it is likely to fail.C
.-rso ale y N yh sa tep He proclaimed next Nov. 11_ "We'll climb if our. absentees er
nrad Jr. is congratulated by a Navy frogman as he is about to step first anniversary of the day the are back," said Sen. Philip A. tio
the Atlantic Ocean yesterday. The scene followed the splashdown white minority seized independ- Hart. (D-Mich.) who watched a tia
Richard F. Gordon Jr., marking the end of their record-breaking ence-a public holiday, a day debate-halting effort fall 10 votes for
during which Rhodesians should short of Senate approval Wednes- ml
celebrate what he called "the day.I
greatest day in Rhodesia's his- Senate Democratic Leader Mike fea
tory." Mansfield agreed. But neitner Se
No mention was made Prie man claimed enough votes can si
ae of Pre be changed and added to reverse
Minister Harold Wilson's ulti- Wednesday's outcome. I
ondematum to return to British con-
trol before the year is up-or
face the wrath and compulsory
t Sew R ec r G'sanctions of the United Nations.: rdN w
Last Chance
Smith has yet to react formally -
Gemini 10 set the old mark of scientific and technical experi- to "the last chance" Wilson of- By The Associated Press
476 miles. ments missed on previous Gemini fered him Wednesday to compro-a e
First flight of tethered vehicles flights. mise. WASHINGTON - A move to b
-Gemini 11 and the Agena satel- Mission goals set for Gemini' In Lusaka, capital of neighbor- strip Rep. Adam Clayton Powell, He
lite flew three hours tied to- 1 pilots Charles Conrad Jr. and ing Zambia, passions generated (D-N.Y.), of his powers as chair- pr
gether with a 100-foot cord. Gordonr " all accomplishedE. by Wilson's refusal to unleash man of the House Education and in
Longest extra-vehicular activ- and more," said Dr. George E fierce action against Smith ran Labor Committee was disclosed lic
ity-Astronaut Richard F. Gor- M e sae ditor high. Foreign minister Simon yesterday by Rep. Sam H. Gib- ar
don Jr. was exposed to the vacu- oftiannsAeronautics and Space Kapwepwe returned home from bons, (D-Fla.), a leader of the in
National ArnuisadSae!,(-l.,a edro h
um of outer space, two hours and Administration. the London talks to report to revolt.
.e
52 minutes. Astronaut Eugene A. Fl oceded ho'ever t President Kenneth Kaunda, main- Gdspe
Cernan set the old mark of two a news conference at Houston. taming that Wilson is a racist ibbons said he nsxt mrve
hours and 10 minutes on Gem- ento o and an imperialist out to pre- in the committee next Thursday
ini 9. Tex., that Navy Lt. Cmdr. Gor-sev white domination over Rho- If or the adoption of new rules abi
ini 9. . ~ ~~~~*don's exhausting experiences dur- iserve htdmnainveRh-htwudpacPwe'soerm
First automatic re-entry-Astro- ing his walk in space show "we've desia's four million black Afri- that would place Powell's powers m
nauts on previous flights have got a lot to learn" about men cans. The bearded African seemed ithand of six sucmmtee dm
either manually controlled the obiiusoteaplg h rt chairmen. He said he expects to
spacecraft or shot back on a bal- working outside a spacecraft. ish said they had received from win.
isicore"We don't understand this ex-(I
istic coursetra-vehicular activity-EVA," said his colleague Finance Minister Powell, who had learned of Gib-
tra-ehiula aciviy-EV, sid rthr Wna.boii's plan, called a news confer-
Men Not Horses Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, director of Arthur Wina. mbossselneclledGabnscone-
Gemini project officials lauded NASA's Manned Spacecraft Cen-s en be e Gbosddiclosesi
the success of Gemini 11 and ter at Houston, Tex. "We've done On Viet Nam they noted with and accused the Florida Congress-
said difficulties encountered dur- EVA maneuvers on Gemini 4, particular concern" that since man of reaching and l n
ing astronaut Richard F. Gordon Gemini 9, 10 and now 11. they had last met in January the political irresponsibilitynla new
Jr.'s shortened space walk taught "Each time we've felt we conflict had intensified. "They high in racial hysteria."
them "we're dealing with men learned from the past-we've expressed deep anxiety at thei*
and not horses." made changes and tried to im- tragic and mounting loss of life WASHINGTON-France, which
They also announced the next prove our equipment. From his and devastation in Viet Nam and during the first half of this year!
and final flight in America's two- flight, all we can conclude is were conscious of the danger that drained $323.5 million from the
man program, Gemini 12, has, that we aren't quite sure what it the conflict might spread and de- U.S. gold supply, has made an ad-
been extended from three to four is we're missing." velop into a major international vance payment of $70.8 million on
days. Beyond Space Suit conflict." its debt to the United States.
This will permit completion of "It seems to me the problem
goes beyond the space suit in this
case," Gilruth continued. "The SE
ne A'Ionth work load that has been generated
by a man exceeds the work load
-It A 11i LIC~TICT

e first vote-three supporters
d one opponent of the effort
end debate. The vote was 54
42. Since 96 senators voted, the
o-thirds needed by the bill's
ckers was 64, or 10 more than
ey got.
Blocked Action
The eight-day debate has block-
action on Hart's motion to put
e bill before the Senate.
Senate Republican Leader Ev-
ett M. Dirksen, whose .pposi-
on assured rejection of the ini-
l cloture bid, said the new ef-
rt is based on frail, futile last-
inute hope.
Aswed whether a Monday de-
at would put the bill on the
nate shelf, Mansfield said

mply: "I'm afraid so."
New Proposal
Hart said he believes if the

Four senators were absent in, is dropped, Johnson will send

bill

Congress a new, similar proposal
next year.
A new bill in a new Congress
would have to begin all over
again the path to approval. And
Hart acknowledged it would be
responsible for the House, which
passed the controversial measure
in an election year, to insist that
the Senate act first next time.
This would create new prob-
lems, since Sen. James 0. East-
lands, D-Miss., a bitter foe of
civil rights legislation, heads the
Senate Judiciary Committee. Sen-
ate leaders were able to bypass
the Judiciary Committee this
time by putting the House-
passed bill directly on the Sen-
ate calendar.
Open Housing Section
.A compromise open housing
section is a key target of opposi-
tion to the measure. But both
Mansfield and Hart, the bill's
chief Senate sponsor, said there
is no plan to drop that provi-
sion in an effort to gain support
for the. rest of the bill.
The measure also includes pro-
visions aimed against discrimina-
tion in jury selection, would au-
thorize government - sponsored
court action against any violator
of federally protected rights, and
would make it a federal crime to
use force or threats to intimidate
civil rights workers.
Dirksen, who has focused his
criticism on ' the open housing
provision has indicated he would
not support the 'bill even if it
were eliminated. Dirksen and -his
allies also have criticized the jury
selection provisions.

I

i

Roundup.

This was announced yesterday
Secretary of the Treasury
enry H. Fowler who said the
epayment will reduce France's
debtedness to about . $300 mil-
on on post--World War II loans
nd financial settlements result-
g from the war and postwar
riod.
Since 1947, France has repaid
bout $1.85 billion of which $810
illion was paid in advance of the
ates specified in the loan agree-
ent.

---I , --I-

Fastest rendezvous and dock-
ing-First orbit. The old mark
was three orbits.
First rendezvous using on-board
equipment-Other flights got help
from the ground.
First-multiple docking in space
-Each astronaut did it twice.
Highest altiture - 850 miles.
CIA Serves (

SHABBAT SHUVAH
The Sabbath of Return
TONIGHT 7:15
Special Prayers with the Liturgy Chanted by
THE HILLEL CHOIR
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street All Are Welcome
: 4:.:'?"":. . ... r:??."""{ :?: ;;:::;":::t'g;}:?"r?""S%.;:?:I:. .'? ;;7"t ? t !:.t Y!:" {, rs.p"'$d.
v~e:".+rrr' ~ dr:r k:"'i~i ."l { 1: .V"A>'r.t. -.-Y".::".r-'-.-V-.-.-,-.-.-.-.-.-.-,-.-.-. ....de{. ."? .G. kC::.

Red Guards still stood high in that is reasonable to ask of a
off icial favor. m~,r T~-tatnsraonbet.ako
*M aasAsilent, asthe had beenN oticrCharles W. Dathews, Gemini
at two big Red Guards rallies last program manager at the Manned
month at the height of the teen- WASHINGTON (R)-The Cen- Tofte put his side of the case Spacecraft Center, said officials
ager campaign against anti-Mao tral Intelligence Agency served to newsmen during the inquiry, will study the situation hard to
and foreign elemtns. There have a one-month dismissal notice yes- and it was understood that one see how it will affect Gemini 12
been numerous reports that he is terday on Hans V. Tofte, the vet- reason the board recommended plans.
poor health and a Honk Kong eran agent who has been at odds his ouster was that it was felt Gemini 12 astronaut Edwin E.
paper has said he has cancer of with his CIA bosses. the publicity had reduced his val- Aldrin Jr., with command pilot
him to speak at length. Adhering to the supersceeret ue in an undercover profession. James A. Lovell at the controls,
Speaking first, Lin urged the agency's policy of saying as little Tofte's Northwest Washington currently plans to take a space
Red Guards "to uphold Chair-I as possible publicly, a CIA spokes- house was up for rental or sale wallk of at least 90 minutes.
man Mao's teachings, strengthen man declined to go beyond this that July weekend and one of Aldrin's main task will be to
the power of the revolution by announcement: "A letter is going those coming to the premises was try and maneuver with a rocket-
uniting with the workers, py out today notifying Mr. Tofte of a CIA man. CIA's version was powered back pack. Gemini 9 as-
sants and soldiers, and fire-y termination of his contract with- that this employe went to Tofte's tronaut Eugene A. Cernan had
conentatn rod uctn." m in 30 days." home purely as a would-be renter, to abandon plans to use a similar
concentrate on productionNo comment was immediately that he saw some secret CIA ma- pack when overwork shortened
~available from Tofte, 55, whose terial there in violation of CIA his space walk.
Read intelligence career began with the regulations, and that he there- Sixteen scientific and techni-
Re d anti-Nazi underground in World after returned with another CiA cal experiments, plus different
D yWar I.w dI de agent to pick up the material. types of rendezvous approaches
Weekend Incident Tofte contended they entered his to an Agena target satellite, also
Tofte got into trouble with his household under- false pretenses will be attempted during the
CIa ssif ied s CIA superiors over' a July 23-24 and violated his constitutional Gemini 12 mission, now scheduled
weekend incident. rights as a citizen. to begin Oct. 31.
___ __ __ __ __ __ __I&__IiA I r-rIAA C fI' I

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