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September 13, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T JV~flAV QVDTRMW' l 'ffA J. -TZE5 1-),role

PAGE TWO TIlE MIChIGAN DAILY

.avr oLnx, L3zrtjt lvlDrK 13, 1966

i

Federal Aid Raises
Med School Quality

PERFORMING ARTS:

(Continued from Page 1)
must go through a more thorough
evaluation of each student before
he is admitted. Slightly less than
half the students who apply for
admission are from Michigan. Al-
though more consideration is given
to state residents in making selec-
tions when other factors are equal,
the school feels compelled to ad-
mit out-of-state students for sev-
eral reasons.I
New York
Newspaper
Hits Stands
NEW YORK -) - A new Man-
hattan afternoon daily newspaper,
the World Journal Tribune, was
born yesterday, after 4/2 months
of bargaining.
Union contract stalemates had
delayed publication of the news-
paper for 140 days.
The first edition of the 900,000
press run was held up for more
than an hour by what was des-
cribed as normal confusion of its
first day. Mayor John V. Lindsay,
scheduled to start the presses, had
to leave before they were ready to
roll.
The. new standard size, eight-
column daily, which also will pub-
lish on Sunday, strikingly resemb-
led in format the old World-Tele-
gram and Sun. However,' it con-
tained many by-lines and features
from the old Journal-American
and the Morning Herald Tribune.
The lead editorial in the 80-
page first edition announced:
"This is 'a newspaper. It combines
the talents, the traditions and
many of the features of three pub-
lications."
The paper sold for 10 cents, the
standard newsstand price in re-
cent years for Manhattan after-
noon dailies. The Sunday edition,
will be 30 cents in the city, 35;
cents in the suburbs.
The World Journal Tribune's3
emergence brought to four the
number of 'major Manhattan dail-
ies of general circulation. It join-+
ed the afternoon Post and the7
morning Times and Daily News.7

"The chief of these is that
Michigan is still a debtor state,"
said Barry. "More doctors come
into this state to practice than are
trained here. In addition, we seek
students of high standards whom
we know will succeed, regardless
of the state in which they are a
resident." Last year, 22 of the 200
students in the entering class were
from other states.
The number of women studying
to become doctors doubled between
1962 and 1964 to 25, a figure that
has remained constant since then.
"We have no specific reason to
account for the dramatic increase
in women students; we have no
set quota. Apparently there are
just smarter women around nowa-
days," cracked Carey.
Sixty-eight students admitted to
the Med School were graduates of
or admitted directly from the Uni-
versity. The area of undergraduate
concentration, however, is not a
deciding factor in admissions, ac-
cording to Barry.
"The public should dispense with
any illusions that we admitted stu-
dents who do not have the intel-
lectual capacity to emerge with an
MD after four years," said Barry.
"The program is difficult, it re-
quires the hard work necessary to
make a good doctor, but we stake
our reputation on each student we
admit. Every time a student drops
for personal or other reasons,
everyone loses."
Dropouts from the Med School
average around five to six per
cent over four years. Barry said
that financial difficulty is never
a sufficient reason for a student
to leave because there are ade-
quate grants, loans and scholar-
ships to cover anyone's need.
"We should also dispel the no-
tion that medicine is a rich man's
profession," said Barry, gesturing
to some 200 loan applications he
had on his desk before him.
The school will place those stu-
dents dropping out because of
physical or psychological illness
on an 'indefinite leave of ab-
sence.' Students are permitted to
resume study as soon as their
health has sufficiently improved;
however, the longer a student
spends out of school, the more
difficult it appears to become for
him to pick up where he left off,
Barry said.

'U' Musical Society Announces!
Three Series for Season
ANN ARBOR - Next season's will open the 22 Extra Series. (8 p.m.) Sunday, Nov. 20; Detroit
international presentations for Season ticket orders, or single Symphony Orchestra, Sixten Ehr-
three musical series have been an- concert requests, may be made at ling, conductor, (2:30 p.m.) Sun-
nounced by the University Musical the Musical Society Offices in day, Jan. 8; Royal Winnipeg Bal-
Society. Burton Memorial Tower on the let, Saturday, Feb. 4; Shirley Ver-
The program will include or- U-M campus. rett, mezzo-soprano, Monday, Mar.
chestral concerts, ballets, Spanish The Chamber Arts Series' per- 13; Stockholm University Chorus,
dances and performances by in- formances will be: Violinist Chris- Thursday, April 6; and the Boston
ternationally known soloists on a tian Ferras, Monday, Nov. 14; Mu- Symphony Orchestra, Erich Leins-
variety of instruments. sic from Marlboro, Monday, Jan. dorf, conductor, Saturday, April 8.
The fourth annual Chamber 30; Andres Segovia, guitarist, on Some of the performers in the
Arts Series will open the season Tues-day, Feb. 28; Jacqueline Du Extra Series will be: "Tosca" (Pu-
Saturday, September 24, with the Pre, cellist, and Stephen Bishop, ccini) New York City Opera Com-
Chamber Symphony of Philadel- pianist, Monday, March 20; and pany, (2:30 p.m.) Sunday, Nov.
phia, conducted by Anshel Brusi- the Boston Symphony Chamber 20; Minneapolis Symphony Orch-
low. The second concert of this Players, (2:30 p.m.) April 29. estra, Stanislaw Skrowaczewski,
series will be given by the Mossow Choral Union conductor, Sunday, Feb. 26; and
Chamber Orchestra, conducted by The Choral Union Series will in- Jose Greco and Spanish Dance
Rudolf Barshai. elude: Guiomar Novaes, pianist, Company, Wednesday, Mar. 8.
Chicago Symphony Wednesday, Oct. 12; Toronto Sym-
The Chicago Symphony Orches- phony Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa,
tra, under conductor Jean Mart- conductod, Thursday, Nov. 3; Am- Phone 482-2456
inon, will give the first concert of erican Ballet Theatre, Thursday,
the Choral Union Series on Satur- Nov. 17; "The Consul," (Menotti)
day, October 8, and on October 9 New York City Opera Company,

Petitioning Now Open
for
Two Vacant SGC Seats
Petitions available at
1546 SAB
through Sept. 16

Warren E. Blake, professor of
Greek Language and Literature
at the University, died here Sun-
day morning after an illness of
several months. He was 66. A
memorial service will be held at
St. Andrews Episcopal Church
at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. There
are no survivors.

L'

e

Se
Subcribe to Thechia .al

*.

_ - t _

TUESDAY, SEPT. 13
4 p.m.-Young Democrats meet-
ing will discuss their fall program
in the multipurpose room of the
UGLI.
7:30 p.m.-Professor O. L. Cha-
zaria-Aguilar will speak on lang-
uages and politics in India, for the
Linguistics Club, in Rackham Au-
ditorium.
8 p.m.-The Children's Com-
munity School, an experimental
private school for five and six
year-olds, will conduct a workshop
in Rm. 3Z of the Union for people
interested in working as volunteer
assistants in its program.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 14
3:30 p.m.-The Department of
Architecture will give a lecture by
Ernest Brandl, scholar-in-resi-
dence at the University of Notre
Dame. He will speak on "Adolf
Loos-Pioneer of Modern Archi-
tecture," at the Architecture Aud.
4:15 p.m.-An Anatomy Depart-
ment' seminar: Dr. Donald F.
Huelke of the anatomy department
will speak on "Investigations of
Fatal Automobile Accidents - A

Final Report." The lecture will be
in Rm. 2501 East Medical Bldg.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Brice Carna-
ham of the Engineering College
will speak on "An Introduction to
Digital Computers and the MAD
Language-I" in the Natural
Science Aud.
8 p.m. - The Children's Com-
munity School will conduct a
workshop in Rm. 3Z of the Union
for people interested in working as
volunteer assistants in its pro-
gram.

\.,,.I £ia One.CARPENTER ROAD
{
IN EASTMANCOLOR ,
Shown at 7:40-11:45
ALSO
Shown at 10:00 Only
'
CHABINAI
YiEMMIUXTHE
METRO
COLOR
PLUS: "They Fly Through the Air"
2 Color Cartoons

You'll leave this semester crying,
of course-but you might as well
enter
0
(The new Broadway comedy
based on a book by CARL REINER,
creator of the Dick Van Dyke Show)
Presented by
Ann Arbor Civic Theater
THIS WEEK-Sept. 15, 16, 17
Trueblood Auditorium, 8:00 P.M.
Thurs. $1.50 Fri. & Sat. $1.75
Box office open 10:00 a.m. daily
You can still get season tickets.
5 shows for only $6.00-and better seats, too!

,1

TUESE

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
)AY, September 13, 12:00
U.M. International Center

Noon

SUBJECT:
"COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION IN
GUAYAQU I L, EQUADOR"
(Experiences in Peace Corps work)
SPEAKER: MR. MICHAEL LUEA
Graduate student in Social Work
For reservations, Sponsored by the
call 662-5529 Ecumenical Campus Center

- - - -

At 1:00-3:05
5:15-7:25-9:40

IN COLOR

The"Pussycats"are out of the bag
and in "The Wrong Box!"

Dial 2-6264.,
ihs is the big drama
behind the big dream
of Hollywood's great
"gold rush"!.
jUPH FtffEONE esents
TH OSCA.
WHENP *BO-KE S8MMER- MIEIN BEREELEANOR PARKER-JO8EPH BGCO
JIRS8J0dNIENYBNsERI EADAM S ad ERNESTBORGNlEA R £WS tt

6

"THE WRONG BOX
is a laugh a minute!
MICHAEL
('Ipcress He )
CAINE
changes pace!"
-anda Hale, N.Y. Daily New!

gIIgh
The b
is PE
7 k
C4*

sofantastic it pops
it out of the screen!
best of-the clowning
ETER SELLERS 1"
-osley Cmmh,MY. Tim

11

Saturday
Elizabeth Taylor. in "BUTTERFIELD 8"
and "CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF"

Ir

66BB-.

DIAL 8-6416
Ending Wednesday

COLUMBIA P CIMS
Arew"
13 VAN
FORBEW
PROOtSC7fON OF
A
e .
e
O

"Everything about 'A Shop on Main Street' is just right.
What more can be said in praise!"--Michigan Daily

'

k r""

4

ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNER
"BEST FOREIGN
FILM OF THE
YEAR!"

I

T WO o MILLS RICHARDSON MICHAEL CAINEm.
PETER OUDLEY. NANETTE.TONY HANCDCKwPETER SELLERS .
COOK MOORS NEWMAN asDtmea DrPrm EASTMAN COLOR

I

COMING FRIDAY TO THE MICHIGAN THEATRE

M..

M

I

"Masterful! One of the great films
of our time!"-Cue Magazine
"Marvelous to behold! One of the
important films of this year!
-N.Y. Daily News
Thuesday-"THE IDOL"

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
announces
HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES
as follows

Only one picture has been made this year that is
absolutely off its rocker and positively out of its
mind -and we've got the nuts to prove it-

What a way
to lose,.
marbles.:::.

.:>.
:;..

In Rackham Lecture Hall Auditorium
ROSH HASHANA
Sept. 14, Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.*
Address: Prof. Abraham Kaplan
"Between Man and Man"
Sept. 15 and 16, Thursday and Friday, 9 A.M.
YOM KIPPUR
Sept. 22, Friday evening Kol Nidre, 7 P.M.*
Address: Prof. Philip J. Elving
That We May Search Our Ways

Sean Conneryk
Joanne Woodward

I

.1

I I

11

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