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September 01, 1966 - Image 25

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-01

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SE

THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 1, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVE7~7

..i V{w k7 iilti.4"
. W.

I

SURVEY RESULTS:
May States Face

y TEAL
By STEVE WILDSTROM

Despite delays in congressional!
action, money for National De-
. T Sh rta !fense Education Act loans has be-
come available as planned in the
beginning of the summer, Karl
NEW YORK (P)-School ,ad- ask for authority to use partly Streiff, assistant director of fi-
ministrators in many parts of the 'trained teachers. nancial aids, announced last week.
nation are in a desperate race California, once a magnet for Uncertainties in NDEA funding
against the first school session teachers, reported widespread had earlier forced the Office of
just days away to find enough shortages. 900 in Los Angeles Financial Aids to notify students
teachers for every class. I alone. The State Education De- who had been promised loans that
More than a dozen states will partment said 240 school districts . ,l + f ,h. n,-mild nn..hP

""

_'

ue very of te oans coui not oe
have to find thousands of teachers had been granted permission to guaranteed.
within the next few days, or face hire teachers not fully qualified. Although the NDEA appropria-
the prospect of having to use sub- Reasons for Shortage tions bill is still tied up in the
stitute teachers or instructors with Among the reasons listed for House Labor and Education Com-
less than standard minimum the shortage are rising enroll- mittee, where action was delayed
training. ments, drafting of teachers or because of the committee's at-
AP Survey recently graduated teacher-train- tempts to settle the airline strike,
The shortage was disclosed by ees into the armed services, wide- the University is, according to Di-
an Associated Press survey, which spread rectuiting for federal Head rector of Financial Aids Walter
turned up the fact that some areas, Start and other training provrsms Rea, proceeding in good faith on
such as California, once blessed and competition from industries the expectation of appropriations.
with a steady supply of first-rate for college graduates. Students who have been prom-
teachers, now have critical short- Sam Kain, head of the teacher ised loans may pick up the money
ages. placement bureau in the Montana today at the cashier's office in the
"There is no question that a State Employment Agency, said. Administration Building.
critical teacher shortage exists, Montana faced the worst short-; Rea said that he expects the
just as there are shortages of age in years. with 200 to 300 final NDEA allocation to the Uni-
trained people in many other sec- teachers still to be found. versity at least to equal the $500,-
tors of our economy," said U.S. "It's because the federal Peace 000 granted last year. There is a
Commissioner of Education Harold Corps, Job Corps, this corps and possibility of an increase in funds,
Howe II in response to the AP that corps are taking teachers at since the House is currently con-
survey. higher salaries," he said.
"If the schools are not to suffer "As a generalization," he said,
in this competition, we need now "I would concur that the procure-
only to train more teachers but ment of qualified teachers prob-
to make the teaching profession ably poses a bigger problem this
more attractive so that education year than desegregation. I have
graduates will stay in the field," never heard school superintend-
he said. ents express so much concern."
he sidLowPay ProlemSome Southern states, with
Low Pay Problem teacher salaries below national
"The blunt fact is that the low averages, were having difficulty
pay which teachers have tradi- finding enough teachers. North"
tionally received is now coming Carolina reported the shortage of'
home to roost. The problem will Negro teachers particularly acute.

oansAvala e This ee k 1
0 MAKE YOUR ROOM
sidering a bill which would provide subsidized loans. These loans must Ann Arbor has submitted an appli- ^
a nationwide total of $190 million be negotiated individually by each cation to the Michigan Higher MORE INTERESTING .
for NDEA loans. student with an authorized lending Education Assistance Commission
A relatively new source of stu- institution, primarily banks and' to enter the plan. with
dent loans is being provided under savings and loan associations. Loan Applicants
Title IV of the Higher Education The Ann Arbor Bank is current- Wayne Waggoner, assistant vice- INDIA MADRAS BEDSPREADS
Assistance Act of 1965. The act ly the only local bank participat- president of the Ann Arbor Bank, INDIA PRINT BEDSPREADS
set up a program of privately-fi- ing in the program, although the said that the bank would consider: NUMDAH RUGS
nanced, federally guaranteed and National Bank and Trust Co. of "customers of long standing" as;WOOD BLOCK PRINTS
loan applicants. He said the bank W
felt it was the intention of the act HAND PAINTED SCROLLS
that students should negotiate
Sumier Intitute of. ISt loans with banks in their home
communities.
The Ann Arbor Bank at present
A ttrac ts Fore igi Students has approximately 100 loans out- 340 Maynard Street
standing under the Title IV pro- (across from the Arcade)
Forty-two students from 28 for- the scientific measurement of hu- gram. The number of loans issued
eign countries have completed man activities. to students at the University was
participation in the 19th annual not available.
pamertitiinte 1tndua bMembers are acquainted with : An official at National Bank
hSumey nsituerconucted by t survey methods as applied to the and Trust said that his bank also
the Survey Research Center of the DaiIr
University of Michigan's Institute problems of business, public health, would consider only local students Dy C3 I iedsU G et Resu ls
for Social Research. education, industry, and govern- : at potential loan recipients.
ThSc Rese archs.on " urvy 'Re-ment, as well as in general social-
search Techniques, 1966" attracted' science research.
a total of 133 students, govern- The program is designed to
ment and university members, and meet educational and training
businessmen from this country and needs of its members. Course con-
abroad. tent includes study design, ques-
The annual Summer Institute is tionnaire construction, interview-
a special training session in sur- ing, coding, methods of analysis,
vey research techniques. It fea- and sampling.
tures the use of the sample inter- iThe final meetings took place 1
view survey as an instrument for Thursday, August 18.
Ii --'--- -----_________ --

X14

not be solved easily or soon and
when the solution does come it
will have to come from the local
community.
"Perhaps to some degree the
present situation can be eased by
using teacher aides and unpaid
volunteers. These people could not,
of course, take on teaching assign-
ments. However, they might very
well be able to free the teacher to
spend more time on the essen-
tials of instruction, and I have
urged school administrators to ex-
plore the possibilities of such ar-
rangeMents."
Teachers of science, mathemat-
ics and languages seemed to be in
short supply everywhere, although
some areas reported a need for
elementary teachers.
Illinois, which has about 120,-
000 teachers, still has 21,000 va-
cancies. New York is short 15,000
certified teachers-10 per cent of
the state's total-and may have!
to use instructors whose training
does not meet minimum require-
'ments.
The Michigan State Department
of Public Instruction said an aver-
age of 40 school districts a day

GIRLS

v

SUBJECTS
WANTED
for simple experiment involving
sensitization to a chemical. No
drugs or shots; drops of the chem-

EVERYONE KNOWS MANY
INTERESTING PEOPLE
(or do they?)
How many of your recent dates
were really special?
TRY THE MOST EXCITING IDEA IN
COMPUTER DATING
Call 662-4867
Personal, Confidential Interviews
Michigan Scientific Introduction Service

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shop
FIND AMPLE HELP and guidance in choosing from an evergrowing selec-
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ENJOY SHOPPING where music and artists on records retain their high
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become
ANGELS

I
a

ical are put on the skin.
Chemistry students not
Must be 21 or over, and
be in town for at least 6r

11

eligible,
plan to
months.

11

Attend Open Meeting

Tuesday, Sept. 6
7:30 P.M.
Multipurpose Room
UGLI

Pay: $1.50 for each weekly visit
lasting about 5 minutes. That's
$18 on Hour
if you want to look at it that
way. This is especially lucrative
if you are in the Medical Cen-
ter area. If interested, send a
post card with name, address,
age, and phone number to:

I

11

MUSIC SHOP
417 East Liberty
(Just past the AA Bank)
HOME OF U. OF M. MUSIC

Order Your Daily Now-

Sensitization Study,
Dept. of Dermatology,
U of M Medical Center
(Please do not phone)

NO 2-0675

Phone 764-0558

I

...rte

I

I

Tuesday, September 6
Wednesday, September

...4:15 P.M.
7...4:15 P.M.
EDITORIAL, PHOTO,

BUSINESS STAFF:

See

Liz Rhein

SPORTS STAFF:
See Betsy Cohn

I '

A')A AAowsxEr..ommoJC4 mo(orv i ~rtr 44%^ CADA

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