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January 17, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-17

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PAGE TWO

THE. MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JANVARY 173 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JANUARY 17. 1967

_ยข .,

rs. Wallace Now Governor
Promises Alabaman Freedom'

STARTED IN PEKING:
Red Guards Chosen from High School
Students; Admission Only for Select Group

MONTGOMERY, Ala..A)--Mrs. Wallace expects to run for presi-
George C. Wallace . became Ala- dent again, in 1968 as he did three
bama's first woman: governor yes- years ago.
terday and quickly joined, hei The new governor, a blonde 40-
husband, a likely candidate for year-old mother of four children
president, in a renewed promise to who has accompanied her husband
continue the struggle for "free- an many of his political journeys,
dom." took the oath as governor stand-
Her words and those of the ing on the spot where Jefferson
outgoing.governor in their prepar- Davis was sworn in as president
ed remarks- left little doubt that zf a rebellious Confederacy 106
M ichiga Advisor Pa nel
To Revamp Teacher Codes

LANSING - Former U.S. Com-
missioner o Education Francis
Keppel and two of the nation's
leading authorities on teacher ed-
ucation and certificaiton, Drs. Ro-
bert J. .Schaefer and Donald J.
McCarty, have accepted invita-
tions to assist Michigan in devel-
oping a new State Teacher Certi
fication Code.
State Superintendent of Public
Instruction Ira Polley said that
Dr. Robert J. Schaefer, Dean of
Columbia University Teachers Col-
lege, and Dr. Donald 'J. McCarty,
Dean of University of Wisconsin's
College of Education, as well as
Dr. Keppel, agreed to serve on a
special advisory panel to help Mi-
chigan revamp its educational
standards for teachers.
Dr. Schaefer and Dr. McCarty
have been in Michigan to meet
with all members of the State
Board of Education and Dr. Polley
in a preliminary appraisal of pre-
sent and proposed educational re-
quirements. Dr. Keppel was unable
to attend this initial meeting but
will serve at future panel sessions.
Concern With Teaching Standards

"Educational standards for our
teachers.,are at the very heart of
educational quality for our youth,"
the State Superintendent contin-
ued. "Therefore, the qualifications
we set for the education of our
teachers deserve the most inten-
sive examination, authoritative
analysis, and reasoned decisions
that are possible.
Desire Quality Education
Dr. Keppel, a former dean at
Harvard University, served as U.S.
Commissioner of Education from
1962 until 1965 when he was ele-
vated to an Assistant Secretary in
the 'Department of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare. He is now
Chairman of the Board of Direc-
tors, General. Learning Corpora-
tion in New York City.
Dr. Schaefer, a former assistant
dean of the Graduate School of
Education at Harvard University,
was. made dean of Columbia's
Teachers': College in 1963.
Dr McCarty, who was -appoint-
ed Dean of Education at Wiscon-
sin University last year, had prev-
iously served as a professor of ed-
ucation at Cornell University for
seven years.

years ago.I
Along with her family Bible, she!
also used the one with which Da-
vis was inaugurated.
Mrs. Wallace told a cheering
throng gathered at the foot of the
Capitol steps that she ran for
governor to enable her husband
to "take our fight for states rights
to the final court of appeal-the
people of the United States.".
The inaugural ceremonies wereI
dedicated to the fighting men in
Viet Nam, and in deference to
their sacrifice, Mrs. Wallace and
aer husband canceled the tradi-
tional inaugural ball. They said
.he merrymaking would be inap-
propriate.
An estimated 100,000 visitors
joined residents of Montgomery
along the route of the inaugural
paradeand cheered the new gov-
ernor as she rode in an open car.
Mrs. Wallace told her listeners
that her election last November is
proof that the determination of a
free people to govern themselves
will not be suppressed by force,
from China, from Russia, from
Cuba, and from Washington, D.C."
"It is notice that the people of
Alabama, whose motto is 'We
Dare Defend Our Rights,' are not
in a mood to sit idly by and sur-
render our constitutional system
of government or a single one of
its freedoms by default," she said.
Both Mrs. Wallace and her hus-
band denounced federal bureau-
crats, who, they charged, are
threatening the nation's freedom.
She spoke resentfully against what
she called an attempt to "gain
control of the hearts and minds of
our children" through guidelines
laid down to regulate the schools.

EDITOR'S NOTE: The Red Guards,
you ths manipulated as propagand-
ists and activists in the "cultural
revolution" taking place in China,
are often mentioned-collectively-
in dispatches. Here is a look at an
individual Red Guard, interviewed
by an Italian journalist who has
just returned fron a trip to China.
By ALESSANDRO CASELLA
Written for the Associated Press
Yang Chu-tting is 16. He is a
high .school student and comes
from the city of Hopei in Anhwei
province. His father, who fought
in the Red army during the civil
war, died two years ago and his
mother works as a seamstress.
Yang Chu-tung is a Red Guard.
I met him by chance in the streets
of Canton, dressed in his father's
uniform.
"How did the Red Guards get
started?" I asked him.
"It all started in Peking," he
said.
Last July, students of the high
school attached to Peking's Hsin
Hua University'formed themselves
into a Red Guardhbattalion.
Whose idea it was he did not
knod. Anyhow, Aug. 18 the Red
Guards descended on Tien An
Men Square in Peking and. Mao
Tse-tung appeared, wearing a Red
Guard armband. Next day the stu-
dents in Yang's school, after hear-
ing this news spread by radio and
press, decided that they also would
start a Red Guard group. A small
group of students from among the
more politically active ones de-
clared themselves Red Guards.
Other students who wanted to be-
come Red Guards had to apply

for membership and be approved
by the original group.
Not everybody who applied could
become a Red Guard. One had to
belong to one of the five pure
classes-workers, middle and poor
peasants, soldiers, cadres or re-
volutionary martyrs. A student
from a bourgeois background could
be approved, but this happened
seldom.
Yang Chu-Tung applied for
membership to the Red Guards
about two weeks after the move-
ment started. With his "pure"
class background he had no dif-
ficulty in gaining admission.
After admission he suggested to
station and wait until he finds a
train to take him home to Hopei.
Next spring his school will or-
ganize a long march to Yenan,
which should last six months.

the Red Guard group of his school
that he should be sent to Peking.
Shanghai and Canton to exchange
ideas with other Red Guards.
After one day of waiting he found
a train that was going to Can-
ton. Money was no problem as
the Red Guards can travel free of
charge on any train. Food also was
provided.
On arriving at Canton, after a
two-day trip, Yang Chu-tung and
his friend reported to the Central
Reception Committee set up by the
city authorities. There he was
given a map of the town and sent
to the school where he now lives
and where food is provided for
him.

Once settled, he and his friend
started to print leaflets in which
they "encourage people to follow
Chairman Mao." Other ideas for
his pamphlets he gets from Mao's
quotations-he says he can write
whatever he wants. Then he dis-
tributes his 'pamphlets in the
street. The printing in batches of
100, he does by means of a simple
wax stencil which, together with
the paper and ink, is provided free
to him by the school.
Yang's future projects are
rather vague. He likes Canton and
has given up his project of going
to Peking. Sometime this month
he will go to the Canton railway

CINEMA 1I
presents
The'Guns of
Navarone
(Cinema Scope and Color)
GREGORY PECK
ANTHONY QUINN
DAVID NIVEN
FRIDAY and
SATURDAY
6:30 and 9:15 P.M.

AI

I

Aud. A,
Angell Hall

50c

LU NCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, January 17, 12:00 Noon.
U.M. International Center"

I student or faculty
ID required per group

SUBJECT:
"THE IMPACT OF AMERICAN INFLUENCE
ON NIGERIAN EDUCATION"
SPEAKER: MR. JOSEPH ADESOLA LAOYE (Nigeria)
Graduate student in Public Health
For reservations, Sponsored by the
call 662-5529 Ecumenical Campus Center

Join
The Daily

"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINAL!"-N.Y. TIMES
COLUMIA PCRES
aMes MASON Bau B~trS LYNNE D9GRaVe
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Tuesday 7 and 9
Ann Arbor, Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

UNION-LEAGUE

I

CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL '67

AND
JOHN BARTON WOLGAMOT
PRESENTS
THE P.A.P. REPERTORY COMPANY
in a reading of
'PATAPHYSiCAL POETRY

Across Campus
TUESDAY, JAN. 17 Guild will present Special Wednes-
7:30 p.m,-School of Education day Night Experimental Series
Lecture: Dr. Carl Senichel, direc- Program. No. 1: Jack Smith's
tor of the 'League School for Ser- "Flaming Creatures" and Mike
iously Disturbed Children; will Kucha's "Sins of the Flesha-
speak on "School lExperiences for poids" at thp Arch. Aud.
Seriously Disturbed. Children" in 7:30 p.m.-College of Engineer-
Aud. A, Angell Hall. ing Lecture: Assistant Prof. Brice
8:00 p.m. .' Packard Avenue Carnaham will speak on "An In-
Playreaders presentation in Aud. troduction to Digital Computers
C, Angell Hall. and the MAD Language" in Nat-
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18 ural Sciences Aud.
3:00 p.m.-Erick Sjoqvist, pro- 8:00 p.m.-Packard Ave n u e
fessor of classical archaelogy at Playreaders presentation in Audi-
Princeton University, will present torium C, Angell .Hall.,
the Thomas Spencer Jerome Lec- 8:30 p.m.-The University Sym-
ture on "'Hellenization ,in Archaic phony Orchestra, conducted by
Times" at the Kelsey Museum.,' Prof. Joseph Blatt, in public con-
7-00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema cert at Hill Auditorium.
Shows at 1:00-
NOW 2:55-4:55-6:55-9:05
MARTEN
i MATT HELM,
KARL MALDERNf
' A [tOWM 8A PICTURES RELEAStf, TECHNICOLOR'
NEXT: "THE ENDLESS SUMMER"

AUDITORIUM C
ANGELL HALL.

JANUARY 18 and-19
8:00 P.M.

FREE

I

if

'i

Dept. of Comparative Literature
presents

V

THE EMPEROR JONES
by Eugene ONeill
and
Le Roi Jone's
DUTCHMAN
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
WED.-SAT., JAN. 18-21
$2.00, $1.50, $1.00
Box office opens 10 a.m.
Monday before performance

pim

f 1

49

NOW

rjn,.CAM-PUS

DIAL 8-6416

"A BEAUTIFUL
-z

FILMi"-The New Yorker

4
A
4

GRAND PRIZE WINNER
1966 CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL

'A

a f r JPRESENTS
ANMAN'
_....Jd A WfOMAN
NEXT
MELINA MERCOURI ROMY SCHNEIDER PETER FINCH
"10:30 P.M.Sumier"
DiWm6 by LOPERT 'VTUS M COPuON
TECHNICOLOR*

I

,i

Of

TATE

start
January 16

TODAY !

THE LIQUIDATOR GOES
FROM ONE HOT-BED OF
INTRIGUE TO ANOTHER!

@ur

E
t

Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office
10 A.M.-5 P.M.
All Seats $2.50
Performances:

the new musical

II

II I sWV. II

I

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