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March 29, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-29

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. ARCH 29. 14ttl

PAGE TWO THE MICITTGA~ DAIlY WFfl'NTT~flAV X4APf'TXOO 1OA~'Y

* it I .LZ) *WmX, vAt M.Jr 4Z. L.7U 1

t

FILMS
Hollywood Leaves 'How To Succeed' Play
Basically Unchanged for Excellent Film

Job Corps Statisticians
Quote 70 Pct. Efficiency

Regents Selection Pleases
Faculty and Administration

By CHARLES TROY
"How to Succeed in Business
without Really Trying" is an ex-
ample of that surprising new mo-
tion picture breed: the well-filmed
musical comedy.
Time was when the transcon-
tinental voyage from New York to
Hollywood would leave a hit show
scarred and hitless in the wake of
filmdom's foolish tampering. But

the Oscars and acclaim for "West
Side Story," "My Fair Lady," and
"The Sound of Music" in recent
years have changed all that.
"How to Succeed" is in some ways
even better than its Broadway
model.
Of course, some songs and
dances have been sacrificed (in-
cluding, inexplicably, the hilarious
production number, "C o f f e e

VERBOSITY REIGNS:
Fine Generation Needs
P roof readers, Editing

Break") to the cause of developing
the love story. In most cases, the
songs were weak anyway, and as
a result of the new emphasis, J.
Pierpont Finch's mixture of cun-
ning and heart seems far more ac-
ceptable than it was originally.
Briefly, the story of "How to
Succeed" concerns a young dy-
namo, Finch, who aspires to rise
to the top of the corporate tree
in the World Wide Wicket Com-
pany. As a guide, he relies on a
little book entitled, appropriately
enough, "How to Succeed in Busi-
ness without Really Trying,"
whose credo is so venal that Jay
Gould would have blushed for
shame to read it. In the course of
Finch's meteoric ascendency (you
would swear it happens in less
than a week!) from window-wash-
er to chairman of the board, he
acquires a girlfriend, a nepotistic
rival, and a wild succession of
hobbies, interests, and back-
grounds calculated to melt the
heart of the coldest executive.
Frank Loesser's score is certain-
ly not up to his "Guys and Dolls".
best, but the songs that remain
are ingratiatirg, tuneful, and wit-
tily attuned to the situtation. Par-
tially because of this integration,
"Brotherhood of Man" and "I Be-
lieve in You" are the only two that
have become even moderately suc-
cessful outside the show, and both
are performed well in the movie
version.

In fact, the latter is even im-
proved upon, since Rosemary sings
her reprise of' it (1) to Finch, not
alone, and (2) before Finch ren-
ders it himself in the executive
washroom. The reverse treatment
gives this brilliantly satirical song
even more bite than its first pos-
sessed.
Repeating his stage triumph,
Robert Morse brilliantly embel-
lishes his portrayal of Finch and
makes narcissism seem the most
desirable trait of the year. Rudy
Vallee is a carryover as J. B. Bigg-
ley, and thank goodness, for the
part was made for him.
Michele Lee, a newcomer as
Rosemary, uses her wonderfully
warm, charm and beauty to make
Finchs girl much more than a
mere caricature. Anthony Teague
plays the namy-pamby nephew
with competence, but he some-
times becomes almost silly.in his
determination not to appear sin-
ister.
David Swift, as director-adap-
tor, faced the problem of how to
be faithful to an indoor, one-
locale show and not have the re-
sult seem like a photographed
play. His solution was inevitable:
shot after shot of the Manhatten
skyline we've gaped at many times.
The State Theatre, playing its
second recent Soph Show subject
in less than a month, should be
immediately besieged by all
classes.

WASHINGTON (;P) - Statistics
of the Job Corps showed yesterday=
it has a 70 per cent efficiency rat-
ing on its job - getting school
dropouts off the do-nothing road.
The figures:
As of the end of February, 64,-
878 young men and women had
been in the Job Corps for varying
lengths of time, some only for a
week or so, since it began in Jan-
uary 1965.
Of the total, 45,415, or some 70
per cent, were doing something.
Some 76 per cent of these had a
job, 14 per cent had returned to
school and 10 per cent had joined
the military services.
Some 33,000 now are enrolled
in 115 Job Corps centers. They are
16 to 22 years of age, are free to
leave when they wish but may
stay as long as two years. Most of
them finish a skill training pro-
gram in about nine months.
Behind the statistics there are
individuals with success stories
and there are disappointments,
boys who expected a job at $2.50
an hour and had to settle for
$1.25. There are some who haven't
found a job.
"We're making a concerted ef-
fort, every effort to place them,"
Job Corps Director William Kelly
said in an interview.
One of the problems, Kelly said,
is that many of the Job Corps
graduates still are just 16 and 17
years old, aigd this creates a prob-
lem with work laws and insurance.
There's the boy who told a re-

porter he liked the Job Corps "but
they've got to stop filling corps-
men's heads with all that jive like
you can demand your wage when
you graduate. No good, man.
You've got to start at the bottom."
The Job Corps tells about Alpha
Johnson of Washington who
dropped out of school in the
eighth grade, worked at odd jobs
off and on and occasionally got
into trouble with the police. He
joined the Job Corps and learned
refrigeration and heating at Ton-
gue Joint, Ore..
Now Johnson is back in Wash-
ington with a job installing heat-
ing units in new buildings. A po-
liceman in his neighborhood wrote
the Tongue Point center: "Not
only has Alpha Johnson learned
about refrigeration-and air condi-
tioning, he seems to also be so-
cially readjusted. I wish to per-
sonally thank you for this."
Critics point to the cost of the
Job Corps, some $258 million the
first year, $211 million this year
and a proposed $295 million for
the coming year.
In his poverty message to Con-
gress President Johnson said it
cost about $8,400 for each Job
Corpsman at first and estimated
it would be down to $6,700 in the
coming year.
Kelly points to the cost of wel-
fare payments for those unable to
get jobs and the added income tax
payments from those with jobs.
"It's very clear to me the kind
of investment we're making," he
said.

(Continued from Page 1)
on their "outstanding choice of a
new president."
"Chancellor Fleming is certain-
ly well qualified to assume the
vast responsibilities of leading our
great university," Romney said,
"We look forward to working with
him as our state meets the con-
tinuing challenge of higher edu-
cation in the years ahead "
Profs. Theodore J. St. Antoine
of the Law School and Dallas
Jones of the Business Adminis-
tration School also view Fleming's
future relationships with the state
government and other groups out-
side the academic community op-
timistically. '
Jones said, "He's just the man
the University needs at this junc-
ture in its history. He will estab-
lish excellent relationships with
business and labor as well as with
the Legislature."
"The Regents couldn't lhave any
better person to represent the Uni-
versity with the Legislature and
others outside the academic com-
munity," St. Antoine said. "Flem-
ing is ideally suited for resolving
conflicts between different groups
and at this point in the life of
this institution this might be a
good commodity to have around."
Jones, St. Antoine and Prof.
Russell A. Smith have met Flem-
ing in various capacities in their
labor relations and labor media-
tion board activities.
St. Antoine added that Flem-
ing is a superb classroom teach-
er. "He is a masterful perform-
er in the classroom but does not

By BERT G. HORNBACK
The nicest thing about freedom
of the press is that we are all
censors, and though society may
at times. argue about our right to
open certain books, it never pro-
hibits our closing any of them.
The editorial remark which in-
troduces the current issue of
Generation is enough to make
anyone want to close the magazine
before reading a single item-and,
irony of ironies, the statement is
about editorial freedom! A bit
more editorial attention to the
thankless job of proofreading and
a bit less self-indulgent devotion
to "the cause" would have made
this fine issue of the campus inter-
arts magazine all the more com-
mendable.
Praiseworthy Play
A play by Richard Simon, '69,
is the most remarkable and wholly
praiseworthy item in this Genera-
tion. It is the most ambitious un-
dertaking by far, and also the
most successful. "Our Mutual
Childhood" could do without its
Alice in Wonderland motif--cer-
tainly an unnecessary support for
a play so imaginatively conceived
-and would benefit by having the
occasional bits of whimsical nar-
rative with and flatulence re-
moved.
None of these little faults, how-
ever, is as distracting as the col-
lection of printing, errors which
mars the text on the play. And
even Simon's last words-"This is
the way the play ends. Not with a
bang, not with, a blackout exactly
either, but with a whimper, a chil-
dish, non-dramatic dissipation"-
are not objectionable enough to
disqualify the success of the whole
effort.
Simon doesn't need T. S. Eliot
(who does?) and he doesn't even
need Lewis Carroll or Walt Kelly;
his imagination is significant by
itself, and deserves more attention
to its own productive integrity on
Mr. Simon's part, and serious,
generous applause on ours.
High Quality Poem
"If You Should Be Death" by
Alice Chabot, grad, is a carefully
constructed poem which survives
a false beginning to become a
beautiful lyric piece of the highest
quality. Miss Chabot obviously has
a fine ear and a genuine grace of
mind and voice. One can only ob-
ject, I think, to the first two lines
of the poem, and they seem to be-
long to its source in the imagina-
tion and not to the poem itself.
Clouded Narrative
In "The Leopard of Oklahoma
City" by Dennis Rosemann, grad,
the narrative is not quite clear at
times, and there are too many
passages of anti-rhythmical prose
unheard into poetry, too many de-
tails which somehow are not
translated from the journalistic

substructure of report into' the
true substance of-the poem. But
there are also moments of bril-
liance or almost-brilliance, such
as the leopard's having. "instead
of wild goats and lambs for food,
only cans filled with plastic bags
filled with garbage."#
Fiction Piece Dissipated I
The only piece of prose fiction
in this issue, a short story "Ruthie
at Christmas" by Lemuel John-
son, grad, pays epigraphic obei-
sance to Shakespeare. In its execu-
tion, however, it is flabby and self-
indulgent. The focus of the story
is dissipated among a variety of
cliches ranging from sex to anti-
Christmas, from race to local
color. Only one's respect for John-
son's sure and sympathetic under-
standing of the human beings
evoked in the story saves "Ruthie
at Christmas"-though that par-
ticular saving is itself significant.
The current issue also contains
an "Art Folio," with two fine and
interesting lithographs by Michele
Doner, grad, and pictures of sev-
eral ceramic vases by Clair Col-
quitt, '68. One suspects that the
latter are remarkable creations,
though black and white photog-
raphy hardly demonstrate this
quality. And there are two music
entries. One, "Armistice," by Sid-
ney Hodkinson, grad, is basically
unintelligible to the layman;
though movements of musical
tone, volume, and intensity can be
seen in the imagination, and per-
haps one can even contemplate
what propose themselves as the
notations for dance.
Fiedler in Impressive Light
There is also an interview with
Leslie Fiedler, conducted by Ron-
ald Rosenblatt, '68, and Megan
Biesele, grad. The editors employ
a crude but honest technique of
non-editing their material. Still,
the interview presents Fiedler in
perhaps the most impressive light
he has been allowed in Ann Arbor.
The interview also presents a
capsule description of Fiedler's
"new novel," called the New West-
ern, which may be the most hu-
morous idea seen in print since
a really funny Gargoyle joke.
Finally, one supposes that the
questions asked Fiedler were in-
tentionally exaggerated for the
sake of eliciting interesting re-
sponses, and on this ground one
accepts them. But even as one says
this, one has a terrible, haunting
suspicion that they may have been
serious-and if that is so, then the
total performance of "the wild
moan of literary criticism" may
well be to blame. Thus is might
even be a blessing that Genera-
tion's print is so small as to be
scarcely visible to the naked eye.'
(Prof. Hornback is a member
of the English Department.)

take the center of the stage; he
involves the group."
St. Antoine said, however, that
Fleming is "not a towering intel-
lect; he is a humanizer, rather
than an innovator. He is probably
not as much a source of original
ideas but more able to translate
ideas into practicality."
Gretchen Groth, Grad, chair-
man of the student committee, met
Fleming last Friday night when
he met with several Regents and
the chairmen of the student, fac-
ulty and alumni committees.
She said, "Fleming appeared as
a man more concerned with the
University than his own prestige.
He is very concerned about mak-
ing the University a community
whereby the faculty and students
relate to each other outside as
well as inside the classroom and
wants more meaningful contacts
with students. He enjoys talking
with students."
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
e s *
Michifish, Synchronized swim club,
swim show, March 30, 31 and April 1,
8:15 p.m., Margaret Ball Pool.
Phi Eta Sigma, Spring initiation, Mar.
29; 7:30 p.m., Room 3RS, Michigan Un-
ion. Speaker: John Manning.
Alpha Lambda Delta, Initiation --
awards ceremony, March 31, 5 p.m.,
Conference Room, Michigan Union. All
new members are reminded to attend.
Scottish Country Folk Dance Club,
Dancing, March 29. 8-10 p.m., women's
Athletic Bldg. Step instruction and
practice 8-8:30 p.m. opily.
Joint J udiciary Council, Meeting,
Wed., March 29, 6:30 p.m., 3540 SAB.
* * *
Le Cercle Francais, Le Baratin-enjoy
a French atmosphere, Thurs., 3-5 p.m.,
3050 Frieze Bldg.
* * *
Crop and Saddle, Coed Riding Club,
Riding on ?Thurs. nights, meet at 6:30
p.m. at Women's Athletic Bldg.
* * *
F-~;neering Council, Meeting, Thurs.,
March 30, 7:30 p.m., Room 3529 SAB.
* * *
Christian Science Organization, Tes-
timony meeting, Thurs., March 30, 7:30-
8:30 p.m., 3545 SAB.
U. of M. Rifle Club, Open shooting-
.22 calibre rifle and pistol, Wed., March
29, 7-9 p.m., ROTC Rifle Range. All
rifles and pistols furnished; ammuni-
tion available at a reduced price.
Baha'i Student Group, Discussion,
March 31, 8 p.m., 335 E. Huron, Apt. 5.

m

00

. .. .. .............................. ... .:.... . ... ... . . .. ..4.... .... .~.. t... . 1
. ....s.............. ..................1..".t ..... ..>. . . . ..

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

.-: : : .... s: aa: m m:.te' wpm ... ......... ..

... . .... . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . ...:'.::':: ; ::......:s^ : : os : oo a".:-J mra : ::

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29
Day Calendar
Illustrated Lecture: Morton Feldman,
composer-in-residence, Univ. of Texas,
"After Modernism": Arch. and Design
Aud., 3:30 p.m.
This lecture is open to the public.
Feldman will perform and discuss his
original works for piano: benefit con-
cert for the Artistic Grants Fund of
the Dramatic Arts Center. General
admission $2; students,?$1. March 29,
First Unitarian Church, 1917 Washte-
naw, 8:30 p.m.
Botany-zoology Seminar: Dr. Charles
F. Sing, Dept. of Human Genetics,
"Gene Action and Quantitative Genet-
ics": Wed., March 29. 1400 Chemistry
Bldg., 4 p.m. Tea will be served at
1139 Natural Science Bldg., 3:45 p.m.
Student Relations Committee Meeting
--3516 BAB, 7:30 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Play of
the Month Performance-Neil Simon's
"The Odd Couple": Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
School of Music Honors Assembly -
Harlan Hatcher, speaker: Rackham Lec-
ture Hall, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
College of Engineering Interdepart-
mental Seminar in Fluid Mechanics:
Prof. Hunter House, Univ. of Iowa, "Par-
adoxes in the History of Hydraulics":
Thurs., March 30, 229 West Engineering
Bldg., 4 p.m.
Correction: Please note that the Un-
dergraduate Honors Convocation will be
held in Hill Aud, at 10:30 a.m. Not at
Phone 434-0130
£trnmtc. O CARPENTER ROAD
FIRST OPEN 6:30 P.M. FIRST
RUN NOW SHOWING RUN
THE MOST SHOCKING FILM
OF OUR GENERATION
SEE...
fr AMRC NI TER AIONAL
Shown at 7:15-10:40N
Shown at 9 P.M. Only
.1.

10:30 p.m.
Calendar.

as stated in the Weekly

Undergraduate Honors Convocation:
The annurl Convocation recognizing
undergraduate honor students will be
held at 10:30 a.m., Fri., March 31, at
Hill Aud. His Excellency U Thant, sec-
retary-general of the United Nations,
will speak on "Education in a Chang-
ing World."
Honor students will be dismissed
from their nine o'clock classes. Other
classes, with the exception of clinics
and graduate seminars, will be dis-
missed at 9:45 a.m. for the Convoca-
tion. However, seniors may be excused
from clinics and seminars.
The honor students will not wear
caps and gowns. Main floor and first
balcony seats will be reserved for
them and for members of their fam-
ilies. The doors of Hill Aud. will be
open for them at 9:30 a.m. and seats
held until 10:15 a.m., when the unfilled
seats will be opened to students, fac-
ulty and the general public. At 10
a.m. unreserved seating will be opened
to students, faculty and the general
public in Rackham Lecture Hall for
viewing the Convocation by closed-cir-
cuit television.
Southern Asian Club: Dr. Jim Clark-
son, "Microecological Research in Ma-
laysia": Fri., March 31, bag lunch,
Commons Room, Lane Hall, 12 noon.
Public is invited.
Sesquicentennial Colloquium Dept. of
Psychology: Prof. A. C. Raphelson, "Psy-
chology at Michigan: 1880-1950": Fri.,
March 31, Aud. B, Angell Hall, 4:15
p.m.
Women's Research Club Annual Din-
ner: Dr. Ilene H. Forsyth, prof. of his-
tory of Art, "Early Byzantine Mosaics in
Thessaloniki": Mon., April 3, Michigan
League, 6:30 p.m. Reservations may be
made with Nancy R. Harvie by March
30.
Doctoral Examination for Margaret
Cecelia Cahoon, Education; thesis: "The
Development of Empirical Guiding
Principles and Criteria for School Health
Programs in Canada," Thurs., March 30,
Room 3001 UHS, at 8:30 a.m. Chairman,
M. E. Rugen.
Doctoral Examination for Earl Boyd
Young, Education; thesis: "A Study
of the Relationship Between Certain
Background Characteristics Possessed by
Moore School for Boys Transferees and
Program Information 6 5-6290
You put the key in the door
... and watch spellbound!
Warner Bros. un-A
locks all the doors
of the sensation -
filled best seller.
Rod Taylor

the Length of Their Retention in the Inter-American Development Bank,
Receiving Schools," Thurs., March 30, Wash., D.C.-Students with adv. de-
Room 4000 UHS, at 9 a.m. Chairman, grees Econ., Finance, Bus. Ad. & Public
S. C. Hulslander. Ad. Citizens of any Latin American
country or U.S. citizen fluent in Span-
Doctoral Examination for Richard ish, written and spoken, who have
Stevens Tompson, History; thesis: worked in Latin America or gone to
"Classics and Charity: The English school thery,. Working in Alliance for
Grammar School in the 18th Century." Progress program. Call 764-7460 for ap-
Thurs., March 30, Room 3609 Haven pointments.

Hall, at 3:15 p.m. Chairman, J. M.
Price.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after'
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events mustbbe with-
held until the approval has become ef-
fective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
Alpha Kappa Lambda and IFC, AKL
charity mixer and fund drive, March
31. 8-12 p.m., Union Ballroom.
Philippine-Michigan Club, "Mabuhay
Pilipinas" night, April 1, 5 p.m., 608
East William.
Interfraternity Council, IFC sing,
April 7, 8:30 p.m., Hill Aud.
WCBN-South Quadrangle Council, All
campus dance, April 7,8-12 p.m., South
Quad.
Cinema Guild, An evening of Andy
Warhol, April 9, 7:30 p.m., Hill Aud.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Gradu-
ates and seniors make appointments by
4 p.m. of the day preceding the visits
by the following companies. All em-
ployers expect to see your file before
the interview Please return forms and
update your files as soon as possible.
Call 764-7460, General Division Desk.
MON., APRIL 3-
Peace Corps Team--8:30-4:30 p.m.,
Mon.-Wed. No appointments necessary.
Need for volunteers is only one of the
functions of these reps, to help you
know and decide whether or not you
are qualified for volunteer duty is the
purpose of these people also.
TUES., APRIL 4-
Peace Corps-See Monday liswting.
United Airlines, Corapolis, Pa. -
Women with any degree training for
stewardess trng. programs. Req. 5'2"-
5'9", weight 140 or less in proportion
to height, vision correctable to 20/30,
contacts or glasses permitted,
WED., APRIL 5-
Peace Corps-See Monday listing.

POSITION OPENINGS:
Richardson Homes Corp., Elkhart, Ind.
-Young man, 30-40, for corporate con-
troller. BA or arv. degree in acctg. or
finance. Proven record of employment
with concern with sales volume over
15,000,000.
Chicago Council on Foreign Relations,
Chicago, III.-Educational Director to
dev. edu. foreign relations programs for
secondary schools & Jr. colleges in
metro. Chicago area. Man, late 20's or
30's, min. MA in for. rel., poll. sci., or
hist., several yrs. teaching bkgd. at sec-
ondary or junior college level, organi-
zational and promotional amilities, pub-
lic speaking experience.
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agric. Res.
Serv., Minneapolis, Minn. - Plant
Quarantine Inspector or Plant Pest
Control Inspector, male or female, BA/
MA in biol. sci., 20 sem. hrs. any comb.
of entom., bot., plant path., nematol.,
mycol.. invert. zoo., hortic., or related
nsubject. 4 mos. trng. course in N.Y.
next openings in June, plus 6 mos on-

the-job trng. Complete form SF-57.
* * *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAR-
INTERVIEWS:
THURS., MARCH 30-
Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield
Village, Dearborn, Mich.-Food Service,
male & female over 18, guides, women
only over 18.
Camp Iroquois, Bay City YMCA - 1-5
p.m. Couns., spec. in archery, rifle,
nature, Indian & handicrafts.
FRI., MARCH 31-
North Star Camp, Wis.-Boys. 1-4
p.m. Spec. riflery, camp craft, tennis,
swimming, arts & crafts, & canoe trip
leader.
** *
Details and applications at Summer
Placement Service, 212 SAB, Lower Lev-
el.

ATID

United Synagogue
College Youth

Wednesday at 7:00 P.M.
DR.JAMES GIN DIN
Associate Professor of English
"Color Me Jewish"
Dessert, Refreshments
Optional Hot Supper: Call 663-4129
1429 HILL STREET ALL WELCOME

STILL SHOWING
THE
TRI UMPHANT
FINALE OF
THE 1966
NEW YORK
FILM FESTIVAL!

I

41

LA GUERRE
EST FINIE

Daily Classifieds Get Results

owft -

A

rn, i m t to e- -TL Ki e'-r 1

ENDINUGWTNiIGHT
Shows at 7 and 9 P.M.
Michelangelo Antonioni's
first English language film
starri g
anessa Redgrave
BLOW-UP
Starting THURSDAY: "FARENHEIT 451"

s.

cii
THIS WEEK
Thursday, Friday
EL
(This Strange Passion)
dir. Luis Bunvel, 1953
Spanish, subtitles.
Indictment of bourgeois
repression and orthodox
Christianity
Short: "LONELY BOY"
Study of Paul Anka
Saturday, Sunday
A SHADOW
OF DOUBT
dir Alfred Hitchoece

AWARDS: Shown outside theFes-
tival of Cannes (approved as the
official French entry to the Cannes
Festival last May, i t was with-
drawn under pressure from the
Franco regime). At the end of the
Cannes Festival, a group of Span-
ish film critics awarded LGEF its
newly-inaugurated Prix Luis Bu-
nuel. It also received the Interna-
tional Film Critics' Prize (Federa-
tion Internationale de la Presse
Cinematographic) at Cannes, the
"French Oscars" of the French
Academy (L'Academie du Cine-
ma) were awarded to Resnais for
"the best film of the year" and
to Yves Montand for "the best
performance."
Shown at the non-competitive 4th
New York Film Festival, 1966.
Directed by ALAIN RESNAIS
Starring YVES MONTAND,
INGRID THULIN and
introducing GENEVIEVE BUJOLD.
Produced by SOFRACIMA/PARIS-
EUROPA FILM, STOCKHOLM
A BRANDON FILMS RELEASE
FRIDAY: 7-9-11
SATURDAY: 5-7-9-11

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MICH IGAN

MEN'S

GLEE CLUB

TODAY!

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Annie DIROROL Roberti RUON

Catherine Spaak
Karl Malden
Melvyn Douglas
Technicolor@ From Warner Bros.
Also Roadrunner Cartoon

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SATURDAY, APRIL 1

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UNION-LEAGUE
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A must for all
thinking people!

TICKETS ON SALE

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