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March 23, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-23

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1967

THEATRE

'Patience' Provides a Relevant
View of Contemporary Society

IFC To Ease Expansion;
Plans No New Chapters

By TOM SEGALL

Wilde had his. Timothy Leary al-
so has his.

Though "Patience" is a spoof of For all its topicality, the opera
the Art Nouveau of the 1880's, remains uneven. Gilbert original-
this :show which opened at the ly intended to attack sanctimon-
Lydia Mendelssohn last night has ious young clergymen who always
long out-lived the aesthetes of that have an eye out for attractive
decade. The drooping lilies of young maidens. But his unfailing
Wilde, Whistler and Swinburne sense of propriety kept him from
have long since wilted, but Gil- placing men of the cloth upon the
bert and Sullivan's "aesthetic op- stage for public amusement. He
era" still remains fresh and top- turned to the affectations of the
ical. aesthetic cult, apparently without
An artist, reacting against the re-writing the first act. Aesthetes
conventions of his time, enunci- are not concerned with love; they
ates new principles. Lesser artists are concerned with art. And yet all
follow suit. A school is formed. of the songs in the first act save
Even'lesser artists imitate the work one are on the theme of love.
of the school, carrying it to ab- The talk of art is in the dialogue.
surdextremes, and are acclaimed The Gilbert and Sullivan Socie-
by all sorts of mindless hangers- ty's production is also uneven. Part
on. What Gilbert hit so squarely of this may have been an open-
was the attitude toward all of this ing night that came a few nights
of the plain man (that is you and too early. One gets the impres-

me, fellow theatre-goers). The
plain man listens to these hangers-
on and dismisses the whole move-
ment as nonsense.
It is for the foolish followers
who echo and attitudinize that Gil-
bert's barbs are really intended,
and that is why the opera is stil
topical. Every age has its Raptur-
ous Maidens, and every new poet
has some vulgar followers. Oscar

sion that the show was slightly
under - rehearsed. The correct
blocking was remembered, a split-
second too late, and executed too
consciously. A few lines were
stumbled over, even by the old
reliables. The entrances on some
songs were hesitant. These things
will iron themselves out pretty
quickly.
This is John Allen's second try

HOLDING OVER AGAIN
FOR A
FIFTH RECORD WEEK!
"I CANNOT IMAGINE THAT ANYONE WHO TAKES
MOVIES SERIOUSLY WILL WANT TO MISS 'BLOW-
UP' "! -Jay Carr, Detroit News
"There is a lot of 'LA DOLCE VITA'
in 'BLOW-UP' "!-Louis Cook, Free Press
A STUNNING PICTURE
A FASCINATING
PICTURE . .
about the matter of personal in-
volvement and emotional commit-
ment in a jazzed-up, media-hook-
ed world!"
-Bosley Crowther,
New York Times

at directing. Last December hei
mounted a smashing production of1
"H.M.S. Pinafore," but this time
it seems the Muse was not as kindI
to him, or at least not so consist-c
ently. In the first act number "In
a Doleful Train," it is very im-
portant that we realize that Bunt-,
horne's asides to the audience are
overheard by the Dragoon GuardsI
but not by the chorus of Raptur-
ous Maidens. What we saw on the
stage did not clarify this. Mr.
Allen stretched the officers across
the back of the stage in a wide1
semi-circle, with the women's
chorus only slightly downstage on
a concentric semi-circle. If the one,
heard, why not the other? One
wished for the clarity of blocking
in the D'Oyly Carte production
of "Pirates of Penzance," where
the entire group of policemen were
seated on one side of the stage,
the pirates on the other.
And yet there were flashes of
the inventiveness that animated
the "Pinafore" production. In the
second act Grosvenor tosses off
the line, "Of course, you all re-
member the story .of the Magnet
and the Churn," and exits. For a
moment we really thought we were
going to miss one of the most de-
lightful songs in the show. Of
course, he was called back. This is
the way Mr. Allen likes to play
with the audience.
Perhaps these reservations
should be considered as an after-
thought, for they certainly did not
dampen the audience's enthusiasm
for some very sparkling perform-
ances. William Moore as Reginald
Bunthorne, fleshly poet, has not
only an unerring sense of comic
timing, he also has a deep under-
standing of Gilbert's dialogue.
The audience pays an actor the
highest compliment for letting a
playwright have his due, and this
compliment was paid to Mr. Moore
with spontaneous applause on his
delivery of Gilbert's lines: "... the
dust of an earthy today will be-
come the earth of a dusty tomor-
row."
Kathleen Samra, as Lady Jane,
would have stolen the show if it
had not already been stolen by
Moore. You'd swear it was Jona-
than Winters under that powder-
ed wig. Nancy Hall, in the title
role of Patience, sang well but
tended to go sharp.
Charles Sutherland, as Archi-
bald Grosvenor, Beauty's trustee,
remains the most graceful and
temperatehperformer in the So-
ciety. His diction is bell-clear, his
movements measured, his inflec-
tions lilting.
The orchestra, under the direc-
tion of John Planer, was adequate.
Try Daily Classifieds
Something To Swap?

(Continued from Page 1)
one even knows we exist. We're
not even listed in the student di-
rectory." The problem of anony-
mity seems to be a major one in
these houses.
Appel cites another difficulty
his house encountered. "At first
our trouble was with housing;
when we didn't seem to be pro-
gressing some people just walked
out."
Nevertheless the new houses ap-
pear to be winning their struggle
to form a niche for themselves in
the system. Each of the new
houses feel they have something
to offer which cannot be found in
the older established houses.
Challenge
Getzon calls them "more of a
challenge." Pi Kappa Alpha says
in its rush publicity "Being the
youngest and most modern frater-
nity at Michigan we have no an-
tiquated traditions or outdated
pledge programs."
Appel asserts that the elimina-
tion of hazing began in the newer

houses long before the recent
controversy.
Tau Epsilon Phi, its members
said, "is a fraternity with new
ideas that stand out in the fra-
ternity system here at Michigan."
All three of the new houses
claim that it is a great advantage
to be able to formulate new tra-
ditions and policies without the
usual pre-existing prejudice which
tend to retard change. However
one former pledge at one of the
new houses disagrees. He claims
that setting up a new house
creates "an incredible amount of
confusion."
Sage admits that "It takes a
different kind of guy to pledge one
of those houses."
Apparently those "different kind
of guys" are now at a premium.
Tau Epsilon Phi, with a member-
ship of 27, was able to find six
pledges. Pi Kappa Alpha with 19
actives took six pledges this se-
mester. Sigma Pi with 43 members
took a pledge class of four.

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Sponsored by the School of Music

You straightened out the room in broad daylight..

It's This SATURDAY NIGHT
3:30 P.M., Hill Auditorium
The U ofM, 19-PIECE
INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS

*'

____________ _____________

First time in this area*
IN CONCERT
Father Tom Vaughn
Acclaimed as one of the nation's leading young jazz pianists is
Father Tom Vaughn, an Episcopal priest from Midland, Mich.
He will give a three-night series of concerts at the Penn Theater
in Plymouth on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, April 13, 14 and 15.
Sponsored by the Plymouth Youth Council, the R.C.A. recording
artist-clergyman will present performances that include both jazz
standards and original compositions.
Seats for the concerts are available now. Just clip out the coupon
below and mail it with your check or money order for tickets. Reserved
seats also available at Penn Theater or Melody House, Plymouth.
Thursday, Friday and Saturday, April 13, 14 & 15, 8:30 P.M.
PENN THEATER
Plymouth, Michigan
Ali Seats-$3.50
--------------r-----_------------
Plymouth Youth Council
P.O. Box 451
Plymouth, Michigan 48170
Enclosed is $ for tickets at $3.50 each to the
April performance of Father Tom Vaughn at the Penn
Theater.
Name
Address
City State Zip
(Be sure to specify date and alternate)

*F

but some things still breathed and pulsed with what

*

had happened the night before -

Warner Bros. unlocks
all the doors of the '
sensation-filled best seller.

4

U
m
In

JLMAJ

r

"SO STUNNING THAT
YOU WANT TO SEE IT
MORE THAN ONCE!"
-Archer Winsten,
New York Post

t

CATEIESPAUKRMALDN MEN OUGLS ICAR CONTE* MICHALRBENNIE
STARTS TODAY
KEVIN M IYIeMl~lflIand f lUI_

X"MOST TALKED-~
ABOUT OF THE
NEW MOVIES!"
-Dick Osgood,
WXYZ
Michelangelo Antonioni's
first English language film
starring
Vanessa Redgrave

4f

ORIGINAL SOUND TRACK ALBUM ON WARNER BROS.RECORDS. TECHNICOLOR@ FROM WARNER

BROS.

L

DIAL 8-641(

BLOW-UP
6 co-starring
David Hemmings
Sarah Miles
A Premier Productions Co., Inc. Release

Don't

A b
alvilial

PRESENTS

On April

19-23, Ann Arbor Civic

f' y
-. .. , w v vt:tir,,;tiir}"x,.- . tti ; :' :Y£ y;:xS:'t : ::y:".:::":::{.y:;: rf" : rSS:r .;,.,;, ry;G: r":<" y;>:oy:ti"'t;r.;.
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THE

REPERTORY
COMPANY

will present in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

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'ihe 04y'Motion'Pictwre 'That
Guarante ou'A'etter'iton!
MIRISCH CORPORATION
THE Davin SWIFT
PRODUCTION OF
i FRN

ELLIS RABB, Artistic Director

IN A

6*t FALL FESTIVAL

of

3 NEW PRODUCTIONS_

The performances will almost certainly be sold
out. If you hope to see the show, we strongly
advise ordering your tickets by mail NOW.
Tickets currently remaining are described be-
low. Best bet: Wednesday.

a

c
E

ST19-4 si. 26-OC. 1
nA brilliant Belmadramatast
Michel de Ghelderode's
"farce to make yousad."

OCT. 10-15, 17-22
The AMERICAN PREMIERE of
Eugene Inesco's

One of the classic American comedies
of the Twenties.
THE
sNhiw-Ewr

19-

OCT. 24-29, OCT 31-NOV. 5

Thurs.. April 20-
Fri., April 21-
Sat., April 22-
Sun., April 23-

First 12 rows of orchestra
All remaining seats .....
Last 3 rows of orchestra
Last 7 rows of balcony
A few balcony seats, sides

SOLD OUT

ROBeRT MORNCPIE
iumcueicle
RUDYVaLLC '
'C , E ° YC o * 4 . A D r E SN G 't
zr/YME .4P ED; '

A superb, harroing,
nostalgic drama of
the death of Everynan.
Distinguished success
of the 1967 Paris Season.

N

by
Pulitzer Prize.Playwright
George Kelly

Last 7 rows of orchestra .
All balcony seats ... .. .

4

Translated by Donald Watson

0

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ux

SATURDAY!

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NOTE: The Sunday

I

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