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March 07, 1967 - Image 18

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-07
Note:
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Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY -SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT THE MICHIGAN DAILY - SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

Tuesday, March 7, 1967 Tuesday, March 7, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY- SESQUICENTENNIAL. SUPPLEMENT

.. ,.

Music

Highlights

of

1967

Hudson s

salutes

Univer

by SUE REDFERN
The University inaugurated the
musical celebration of its Ses-
quicentennial year last Jan. 8,
when the Detroit Symphony in-
cluded in its performance "Var-
lations for Orchestra" by Univer-
sity composer Leslie Basset.
The performance of the Bas-
sett work is part of a program to
recognize the achievements of
University musicians throughout
Diny
1967. Every orchestra scheduled
under the auspices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society to perform
in Ann Arbor during the year
has been invited by the Sesquicen-
tennial Committee to program a
work by a University composer.
The Minneapolis Symphony

Orchestra performed Ross= Lee
Finney's "Concerto for Percussion,
and Orchestra" in its Feb. 26 Hill
Auditorium concert. Finney, like'
Bassett, is a professor and com-
poser in residence at the Univer-
sity's School of Music.
Two Commissioned Works
The Sesquicentennial Commit-
tee has also commissioned two

delphia Symphony conducted by
University alumnus and former
faculty member Thor Johnson will
play the orchestral score. Waldie
Anderson, another University
Choral Union providing the chor-
al background.
The second commissioned work
is a composition for orchestra by
Roger Sessions, a prominent con-
tempory composer now in resi-
dence at the University of Calif-
ornia at Berkeley. According to
Rector, Sessions has not decided
what form his piece will take,
but Rector speculated that the
score will include a piano part.
The complete work will receive
its premiere performance Oct. 1
by the Chicago Symphony Orches-
tra under- the direction of Jean
Martinon.
Summer Music Program
The year of celebration will see
the inaugural of a University-
sponsored summer music program,
the Fair Lane Festival. Patterned
after annual events such as the
Berkshire Festival in Tanglewood,
Mass., the festival will be located
on the lawns of the late Henry

ofMichigan's Sesquicentei
and the hundreds of graduw'e wl oe o h le

FiAIR LANE EVRTATE

ROSS LEE FINNEY
works especially for the celebra-
tion:
The world premiere of Finney's
"The Martyr's Elegy" will be per-
formed on Sunday, Apr. 23, as
part of the Musical Society's an-
nual May Festival. The musical
society changed the traditional
May date to April this year so that
the festival could serve as a pre-
lude to commencement, Gail Rec-
tor, executive director of the Soc-
iety, explained.
Based on the text of Percy By-
sshe Shelley's poem "Adonais,"
"The Martyr's Elegy' is scored for
high voice, a chorus of mixed
voices, and orchestra. The Phila-

Ford's Fair Lane Estate in Dear-
born.
This 1369-acre wooded tract has
been the center of the University's
Dearborn Campus since 1956,
when it was bequeathed to the
University by the Ford Motor
Company. Its grounds include a
56-room mansion and large ex-
panses of natural landscaping and
formal gardens.
The festival, which is expected
to become an annual event, was
planned by the Musical Society
under the direction of Rector, "in
keeping with celebration motif of
the University as a 'spearhead of
new ideas' and as a 'sustaining
margin of excellence' ".
Festival of Festivals
This summer's concert program
has been conceived as a "festival
of fesivals," Rector explained. Five

Festival orchestras will present
concerts over five weekends in
June and July.
The schedule is as follows:
June 4: Baroque Ensemble of
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra,
Jean Martinon, conductor. (two
concerts)
June 11: Baroque Ensemble of
the Chicago Symphony, Antonio
Janigro, guest conductor. (two
concerts)
July 5-6: Caramoor Festival
productions; two parable operas
by Benjamin Britten.
July 16: Bath Festival Orches-
tra of London, Yehudi Menuhin,
conductor. (two concerts)
July 23: National Festival Or-
chestra of Stratford, Ontario, Os-
car Shumsky, conductor. (two
concerts)

vl'i na.LAii'i

careers

through

the

ye

LESLIE BASSET

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ill

GAIL RECTOR

11

Alumni
WithV
By CAROLYN MIEGEL
The alumni kicked off their cele-
bration of the Sesquicentennial
year whenr300 alumni participated
in an around-the-world cruise
aboard the- 20,000-ton liner, the
S.S. President Roosevelt.
Sponsored by the University of
Michigan Alumni Association, the
cruise left from San Francisco last
October 12 and arrived back in
San Francisco on January 9. Visit-
ing over 20 ports and meeting with
other alumni organizations during
the cruise, the S.S. President

Celebrate

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Roosevelt offered alumni seminars
by University faculty, special so-
cial events, visits by University ad-
ministrators along the trip, as
well as flown-in films of the Mi-
chigan football games.
University President Harlan
Hatcher, in a message to alumni,
described the trip as a "highly ap-
propriate prelude to the fine ser-
ies of events being scheduled" for
the Sesquicentennial. "It repre-
sents a new invitation to world
understanding through a cultural
exchange among people with the
common background of the Uni-

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PROUD TO SERVE
THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY
NOW TWO LOCATIONS:
West Side-Stadium Blvd. at Jackson Rd.
New East Side-Washtenaw Road at U.S. 23®

rruise
versity of Michigan," Hatcher add-
ed.
Fares for the cruise ranged from
$3,200 to $18,340. Alumni had two
alternatives: they could take the
cruise all the way around the
globe or leave the Roosevelt when
it docked in New York on Decem-
ber 19.
The 300 alumni traveled from
San Francisco to Hawaii and from
there to Japan, Hong Kong, Man-
ila, Singapore, Ceylon, India,
Egypt, Lebanon, Greece, Italy,
France, New York, Jamaica, Co-
lombia, Panama, Mexico and back
to the United States, docking in
San Francisco.
The trip covered approximately
27,000 miles.
Other alumni activities celebra-
ting the Sesquicentennial include
regional alumni celebrations in
Boston, New York, Washington,
Chicago, Los Angeles, and Hous-
ton, as well as other centers of
alumni concentration.
Happy Birthday
These regional celebrations will
be similar to the festivities that
took place here in early March,
whirh concluded with an "Alumni
Birthday" celebration in Cobo
Hall on March 4.
"Our Michigan," edited by for-
mer University Secretary Erich
Walter, is a collection of remin-
iscences by University alumni, in-
cluding Arthur Miller, John Ciardi,
James A. McDivitt, and, the late
astronaut Edward H. White,, II.
Another alumni contribution to
the Sesquicentennial is an art ex-
hibit that will open at, the Uni-
versity Museum of Art on October
1. The exhibit is' a show of art
works collected by alumni.

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