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March 07, 1967 - Image 19

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-07
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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN fDAILY -- 'ZPZOi I(CT kFPI &Alci inn' f:kAt~ki-r

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.. r r~it. r~vai vnr_ 1 7G.4/V4CIVI CVIV/1L urrt~t I uesday, March 7, 1967

Tuesday, March 7,

1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY -SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

Tuesday,~~~~ II II Mach7,167TH ICiGND LY- EOUCETNNALSPPEMN

The

Five

Major

Ceremonies

By ROBERT KLIVANS
The highlight of the University's
Sesquicentennial celebration will
be five major ceremonies, spaced
throughout the year focusing on
various challenges of the Univer-
sity's past, present and future.
The vast assortment of events is
being arranged by the Central Ses-
quicentennial Committee, chaired
by Prof. Charles Joiner of the Law
School. More immediately, Sesqui-
ii,, Te
centennial events are being co-
ordinated by Director Richard
Kennedy and his staff at the Ses-
quicentennial Office.
The first of the five major cere-
monies was The Alumni Celebra-
tion, March 1-5. Under a commit-
tee headed by Detroit alumnus
George Hackett, the five-day con-
ference included discussions and
seminars by nationally known fig-
ures and prominent University
alumni.
Personalities
The major address was by Jack
H. Vaughn ('43), the director of
the Peace Corps. Other personal-
ities included Bill Fleming ('49),
well-known radio and TV sports
broadcaster; Sen. Philip Hart (JD
'37) of Michigan; Playwright Ar-
thur Miller ('38); Lynn Townsend
('40), Chairman of the Board,
Chrysler Corp.; and Mike Wallace
('39), radio and TV commentator.
The celebration was climaxed
by a banquet in Cobo Hall on the'
night of March 4. Other alumni
celebrations throughout the coun-
try were being co-ordinated with
this.
The Second Major Ceremony Is
the International Conference on

Higher Education in Tomorrow's
World, April 26-29. Planned by a
committee chaired by Algo Hen-
derson, the ceremony will include
a roster of distinguished educators
from around the world, including'
two from Iron Curtain nations:
Alexander Danilovich Alexandrov,
rector and Prof. of Mathematics
at Leningrad University, and Adam
Schaff, Prof. of, Philosophy at
Warsaw University.
Relationships
Sessions throughout the confer-
ence will focus on the modern uni-
versity's relationship to "Tomor-
row's Student, Tomorrow's People,
Tomorrow's Civilization and To-
morrow's Nation."
This ceremony will be climaxed

bf the University's Spring com-
mencement, which features Zakir
Husain, vice-president of India, as
the principal speaker.
Other notable educators at the
Second Major Ceremony will be:
Mary I. Bunting, President of
Radcliffe; Grayson Kirk, Presi-
dent of Columbia University; Teo-
doro Moscosco, Special Advisor to
the Asst. Sec. of State for Inter-
American Affairs; Nathan M. Pu-
sey, President of Harvard Univer-
sity, and Owen Meredith Wilson,
President of the University of
Minnesota.
Responsibilities
The Third Major Ceremony is
The University and the Body Poli-

tic, July 12-14. This conference
will study the university's respon-
pibilities to the public, and is be-
ing planned by a faculty commit-
tee chaired by Dean Fedele Fauri.
It will include prominent figures
in government, industry, labor, and
the arts, as well as education.
The Fourth Major Ceremony is
the Voices of Civilization, Oct. 1-6.
Under a committee headed by Prof.
Robert Angell, a list of candidates
representing all areas of human.
accomplishment has been com-
piled. Approximately twenty very
famous names in their fields will
gather in Ann Arbor for the one
ceremony directed primarily at
the campus community. Seminars,

discussions and lectures with fa-
culty and students will highlight
this exciting week.
The Fifth Major Ceremony will
be Fertility and Family Planning
-A World View, Nov. 15-17. The
program is directed by a commit-
tee chaired by Prof. Samuel Behr-
man, and will be centered about
such topics as "Fertility Trends in
the Modern World," "Some Causes
and Consequences of Fertility
Trends," and "Public Programs for
Family Limitation."
Through this wide range of cere-
monies, the University hopes to
study many of the problems and
challenges of the University's first
150 years.

I

Students

Plan

Conference

By AVIVA KEMPNER
Students will be closely involv-
ed in the year-long celebration of
the University's Sesquicentennial.
Their activities include a National
Student Sesquicentennial Confer-
ence scheduled for March 22-25,
and a student escort service for
guiding the guests on campus dur-
ing the major ceremonies..
The purpose of the conference
is to examine the role of the stu-
dent in today's society. The in
tellectual, political, cultural and
moral aspects of student life will
be discussed. About 125 delegates
from American universities and
colleges, plus faculty and guest
speakers will discuss the question
-"Society in Transition: Where
Do We Stand? Where Do We Sit?
The delegates include the stu-
dent presidents or competent cam-
pus leaders of major schools across
the country. They will be housed
by Inter-Fraternity Council, Pan-

II

hellenic Association and Inter-
House Assembly. The conference is
sponsored by University Activities
Center.
Well-known speakers in their
respective fields will talk on four
general themes. Either Sen. Rob-
ert Kennedy (D-NY) or Gov.
GeorgeRomney will discuss the
question, "Is There a 'New Im-
age' in Politics?" on March 23.
On the same day, Dr. Kenneth,
Keniston. professor of medicine
at Yale University, will discuss the
issue,"Is There a New Morality?"
Capt. Frietag, board member of
the NSAS space program, will in-
troduce the problem, 'How Impor-
tant Should Space Exploration Be
in the Future?" on March 24. And
a faculty panel consisting of pro-
fessors in the fields of philosophy,
music, art, drama and literature
will comment on, "Is Social Change
Reflected in the Arts?"
The speeches will be given in
places available to the interested
members of the University com-
munity. After the speaker ses-
sions, the delegates will divide in-
to discussion groups related to the
topic introduced by the keynote
speeches.
Pertinent IssuesE
According to David Johnson, '69,
chairman of the Student Sesqui-
centennial Conference Central
Committee, the conference gives
"the opportunity for top student
leaders of the nation to meet and
discuss pertinent issues confront-
ing our changing society. The con-
ference also allows the student to
be active in the celebration while
bringing interesting speakers to
Ann Arbor for the discussion of
problems relevant to the student."t
A more direct and extensive stu-t
dent involvement'in the Sesqui-
centennial celebration will be thei
Student Escort Service. About 400t
students will serve as guides forf
the visitors to the six major cere-X
monies during 1967. F
Each escort will be assigned
one guest at each conference, ex-c
cept the Alumni Celebration on
March 1-5, which requires only 60

To the University of

Michigan

FESTIVITIES DURING SESQUIGRAS

. . . FOR. THE VISION TO PLAN INTELLIGENTLY
FOR THE FUTURE....
. . . FOR MAKING ANN ARBOR A MORE PERMA-
NENTLY BEAUTIFUL CITY...,
... FOR UNTIRING SERVICE TO CIVIC IMPROVE-
MENT.. .
Our Thanks and Hearty Congratulations
EAST:
3750
Washtenaw
665-4100
2900 THE NATI
aNNKEEPERI-
665-4444 1.

escorts. The other conferences are:
"Higher Education in Tomorrow's
World" on April 26-29, "The Uni-
versity and the Body Politic" on
July 12-14, "Voices of Civilization"
on October 1-6, and "Fertility and
Family Planning-A World View"
on November 15-17. A sixth con-
ference, the 27th Congress of Ori-
entalists, on August 13-19, also
uses the Student Escort Service.
,The Escorters
Interviewing for the escort posi-
tions took place last fall when
the UAC Sesquicentennial Escort
Service selected the 400 from
among 600 applicants. The selec-
tions were done on the basis of
familiarity with the campus, es-
pecially student life, personality,
and knowledge of a foreign lan-
guage, if any. Among the 400 es-
corts are about 35 core escorts
who will perform special duties.
Paul Blackney, chairman of the

BROWSER'S PARADISE
While in Ann Arbor Visit ULRICH'S,
one of the Country's top bookstores
Featuring.
* Reference Books-on all subjects
* Children's Books--recommended by
leading educators
* Art and Engineering Supplies
* Prints and Frames-one of t"te
largest selections in the Midwest
ULRICH'S-Ann Arbor's Friendly Bookstore
549 East University

Student Sesquicentennial Escort
Service, explained that a thor-
ough selection process was neces-
sary "to obtain a cross-section of
University students, not any typi-
cal kind. They are representative
of what the University is today."
Other student events have al-
ready occurred during the first
months of the 150th anniversary.
The production of Musket's "Out
of Our Minds" from January 27-
February 4 was an original mu-
sical written and performed by
students. A contest sponsored last
year by Student Government
Council and UAC awarded a $1500
prize to the two students who
wrote this play, which depicts
the highs and sidelights of the
University's 150 years.
Very Merry Birthday
During the weekend of Febru-
ary 23-25, Sesquigras, the winter
festival that in other years is
called Michigras, was celebrated
all over campus. The theme was
a "very merry U-M birthday"
whichswas present in all the ac-
tivities.
To begin the celebration of Ses-
quigras, a giant "U-M birthday"
cake made out of paper and pa-
per mache was built in front of
the Graduate Library.
Students also participated in
the traditional Booth Night, a
Musical Chairs game on the Diag,
and unusual games at Wines Field.
Included in the games were pie
eating, cake decorating and push
ball contests.. Students were also
spectators to a faculty dance con-
test.
UAC is also making other prep-
arations for the celebration. The
Heritage Room in the Michigan
Union has been decorated with the
pictures and articles of the great
minds who are coming for the
conference on October 1-6. entitl-
ed "Voices of Civilization."
A humorous magazine called
B.S., dealing with the University's
history, is on sale now. Labor
Day weekend might involve the
celebration of the anniversary.

ts

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reads his News to know
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more than 165,000 families headed by a
professional, technician or executive get
The Detroit News at home daily. . . more
than 190,000 on Sunday. Over 100,000 of
them do not get .Detroit's s ec o nd news-
paper.
In this market, The Detroit News goes to
7 of every 10 f a m i ie s with $15,000-plus
income .,., three-fourths of those with
$25,000-plus income: To reach Detroit's
decision makers, just use The News.

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