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March 07, 1967 - Image 13

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-07
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-t

Page Eighteen

THE MICHIGAN DAILY --- SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

Ti tacr4rn1 Meer.-4, - 1 1 Or-'7

Pag EghtenTH MIHIAN DAIY SEOUCETFN IA S IPI 4A I T- .. -u. -... aa~Jy, ivtuuri , QIk..... 1 iy-,

F

Tuesday, . March 7,' 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY- SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

Tuesday, March 7, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY - SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

From
Basketball
Except for two brief, bright per-
cods of success, Michigan basket-
ball has wallowed for the majority
of its 60 years in the dismal depths
of obscurity-in or near the base-
ment of the Big Ten, and has been
seldom blessed with performers of
All-American calibre.
The Wolverines won or shared
four Big Ten titles during the
"Roaring Twenties," and grabbed
three straight crowns from 1964
to 1966. But, except for an ana-
chronistic championship season in
1948, the intervening years com-
posed the Dark Ages of Michigan
cage history.
The early years of the 'under-
handed plop shot' and the 'mass
defense,' witnessed a completely
different version of basketball
than the fast-moving, high-scor-
ing style of today. Scores typically
ranged in the teens, and a con-
- siderably smaller court (70 feet
long as compared to 94 now) pre-
vented the development of any-
thing resembling'the fast break.
Bennie Oosterbaan was the Caz-
zie of that epoch, and his gradu-
ation in 1929 ushered in a nine-
teen year "era of nothingness," as
Wally Weber called it.
Basketball failed to add any
trophies to the Michigan show-
case, nor did it draw any crowds
to the then-waterproof Yost
Field House.
Even its players and coaches
were primarily football heroes
seeking a way to keep in shape
during the off-season.
Then, in 1948, Ozzie Cowles
brought the zone press to Michi-
gan, and the Wolverine cagers
swept through their Big Ten sche-
dule with a 10-2 mark and earn-
ed a spot in the NCAA regionals.
The success was short-lived,
however, as the Wolverines had
settled in the conference basement

Pride
by 1951, and remained there for
all but two of the next dozen
years.
But the 1961 season saw the
hiring of Dave Strack-a Michi-
gan cage star of the mid-forties.
And Strack brought with him the
secret of success-the ability to
recruit the likes of -Bill Buntin,
Ollie Darden, Larry Tregoning,
John Clawson, Jim Myers, and of
course, Cazzie Russell.
A new era had arrived.
In 1964 the Wolverines returned
to the NCAA tournament for the
first time in 16 years, by virtue of
tying Ohio State for the league
title. Duke knocked them out of
contention for the national crown,
but the cry went up-"wait'll next
year!"
And what a year it was.
Michigan raced through its 19-
65 Big Ten campaign undefeated
until the final game against Ohio
State, which Cazzie sat out with
an ankle injury. Throughout the
season it ranked as the top quin-
tet in the nation.
After destroying three consecu-
tive opponents, the Wolverines
met UCLA in the grand finale. But
a full-court press and a skinny
guard named Gail Goodrich end-
ed everything.
But one more season remained
in Cazzie's career, and the Wolver-
ines once more managed to cap-
ture the league flag. Enroute to
the title, Russell broke almost ev-
ery record in the book, but con-
sistently voiced hope that "the
highlight" of his career-namely a
national championship-was "still
to come."
Cazzie's wish never came true, of
course, as the Wolverines folded
before Kentucky's collapsing zone
in the regionals.
But Michigan does have a bas-
ketball tradition-one that began
with Cazzie Lee Russell and one
that will continue next year in
the "House That Cazzie Built."

and

Practice

A

Case

for

the

MuIvI

KEEPING TRADITION AT MICHIGAN

CAZZIE LEE RUSSELL
'Baseball
When Ray Fisher stepped off
the train to assume the coaching
duties for the Michigan baseball
team, he didn't stay long.
He had to hop another train go-
ing south to catch up with his
team. The Wolverines, coachless
at the time, had headed south for
their annual spring training trip.
When Fisher finally did catch
up with the team, *he began a
coaching career that spanned the
era from 1921 to 1958. The 37
years included 15 Big Ten titles
and an NCAA championship in.
1953.
The culmination of his honors
was in that same national title
year when Fisher was awarded
college baseball's highest honor,
being named "Coach of the Year."
Fisher was originally the second
choice for the Michigan head
coaching job that became open in
1921. Branch Rickey, who coached
Wolverine teams while going to
law school, first recommended Del
Pratt. But when Pratt accepted
another chance at playing in the
majors, Fisher got the nod to be-
gin his long and distinguished ca-
reer.
Fisher himself was a major lea-
guer of some renown, pitching
102 victories for the New York
Yankees and the Cincinnati Reds.
Known as the "Vermont School
Teacher," he was a colleague of
such greats as Ed Walsh and
Christy Mathewson.
But when the Reds refused to
give him a three-year contract.
he talked to Rickey and was of-
fered the job.
Fisher's teams were often in the
Big Ten title -icture. Among his
teams' notable accomplishments
was the two-year period in which
they won 16 straight Big Ten
games. None of his teams finished
in the cellar.
When Fisher retWed in 1958, he
left behind him one of the longest
traditions in Michigan sports.
Baseball at Michigan began in
1866, when a group of students got
together a club and played games
where Waterman Gymnasium now
stands. Interest increased, and in
1891 the sport want varsity. The
Western Intercollegiate Associa-
tion was formed ;n 1896 as the
forerunner of the Big Ten and the
sport was off and running.
Perhaps the most dramatic Mi-
chigan team of all was the 1962
edition. They were defending Big
Ten champions who lost their first
four games in a row ar d their title
by a narrow margin. They made it
to the NCAA tournanEnt only to
be dumped into the losers' brack-
et the first clay. Miraculously trey
fought back, taking the title from
Santa Clara, 5-4 in 15 innings in
the final contest.
They went ,n to win the wo:ld
series of collegiate baseball, d fwn-
ing Hosei tUniversity of Japan
three games to two

McFarland, Red Berenson and Al
Renfrew adorn the walls. Many of
these Michigan greats have gone
on to distinguish themselves in
hockey at a professional level.
One of them, Al Renfrew, has
been hockey coach at Michigan
since 1956. In seventeen years of
coaching he has produced seven
national tournament contenders.
"I've had two really great teams
at Michigan," Renfrew comment-
ed. "The 1961 national champions
and the 1964 team -were really
great. As for dedication and get-
ting every inch out of a team,
though, this year's squad has to
be tops. There isn't one superstar
and the boys have done a great
job."
Renfrew was quite a player
himself. He was a standout dur-
ing the four years he played for
the Wolverines and played on
Michigan's first NCAA winner in
1948. Along with Gordon McMil-
lan and Willy Maxis he combined
at left wing to form one of the
highest scoring lines in Michigan
history.
Before a rule was passed pro-
hibiting Big Ten teams from play-
ing benefit games, there was a
traditional one-period match be-
tween the Michigan icers and
the Detroit Red Wings.
"One year that I played we
even beat them," Renfrew mused.
That was the year Gordie Howe
led the Wings to the Stanley Cup.
Swimming
At its inception In 1921, Michi-
gan's swimming team was not a
national contender. In fact, it
wasn't until 1924 that Michigan
had a winning season.
Since then, however, the Wol-
verines have had only one losing
season, a 1-4-1 mark in 1955. Even
then Michigan outscored its op-
ponents on the season, and man-
aged to take second place in the
conference meet.
Figuring all the way back to the
beginning, Michigan's natators
have compiled a challenging rec-
ord of 186 wins, 49 losses, and 5
ties for a formidable .792 percent-
age.
Michigan's championship tradi-
tion began in 1926, when the un-
defeated squad took the national
and conference titles. Averaging
only one loss per season since
then, the Wolverines have col-
lected an impressive total of 17
national championship teams and
19 conference championships. Mi-
chigan coaches have produced 17
undefeated seasons.
Head Coach Gus Stager, who
took over for the great Matt Mann
13 years ago, has continued the
Blue's winning tradition. In his
12 completed seasons as head
coach, Stager has never guided a
team to a finish lower than second
in the Big Ten. Three of his teams
have won conference champion-
ships and four have taken NCAA
titles.
Stager's own coach, Matt Mann,
is more than any other person re-
sponsible for Michigan's greatness
in swimming. Mann was the 1952

Olympic coach. In his 29 years as
Michigan's head coach, Mann
guided his teams to 16 Big Ten
titles and 13 NCAA crowns.
Track
"Total performance" has a spe-
cial meaning within the context
of Michigan's athletic tradition
which has emphasized excellence
in all phases of intercollegiate
competition, and the slogan is
doubly applicable to the precision
performances of the. Wolverine
cindermen.
From Big Ten Championships
to Olympic victories, Michigan
thinclads have made their pre-
sence felt on the national and
world track and field scenes since
A. O. Austin set the first Wolver-
ine pole vault standard of 9'6" in
1893.
The vaulters soar higher and
higher every season (George Can-
amare cleared 15'9" in 1965 for the
latest varsity standard) as com-
petition improves, but despite the
fact that collegiate track has be-
come a cut-throat business, cur-
rent head coach Don Canham has
brought 11 Big Ten crowns to Ann
Arbor in the last dozen years.
Two trends in Michigan track
are clearly discernable: the Olym-
pic successes and world-wide re-
cruiting of Canham.
First to attain greatness consis-
tent with present-day levels, De-
Hart Hubbard garnered a gold
medal in the 1924 Games for the
long jump. A year later, his jump
of 25'10" solidified his pre-
sence in the Maize and Blue rec-
ord books.
Hubbard carved his niche, but
Eddie Tolan, better known to Wol-
verine track buffs as the "mid-
night express," built his palace in
Michigan track history.
Winning two gold medals at the
1932 Los Angeles version of the
Olympics, he earned the title of
the world's fastest human, and
was co-holder of the record for the
200-meter dash until the 1960
Olympic Games.
Canham, Who took an NCAA
championship in the high jump
during his stint for the Wolverine.
solved the problem by going
abroad. He imported such stand-
outs as Tom Robinson of the Ba-
hamas, Kent Bernard of Trinidad,
Cliff Nuttall, Ergas Leps, Laird
Sloan, Jack Carroll and John Ross
of Canada, and Ernst Soudek of
Austria, who all represented their
home countries in the Olympics.
Don McEwen, who led a record-
breaking track squad in 1952, re-
presents another segment of Can-
ham's reign: the relays.
McEwen's foursome set a world
record in the distance medley re-
lay outdoors, and have been fol-
lowed by another outstanding unit
in 1967.
The current heirs of a long
track tradition, the two mile and
distance medley relay squads,
made up of Tom Kearney, John
Reynolds, Bob Gerometta, Alex
McDonald ,and Ron Kutschinski,
are adding another punctuation
mark behind the phrase "total
performance."

By ROGER RAPOPORT stand, however, is. that the de-
fects in the multiversity are not
No one ever has a good word the inevitable product of such
for the multiversity. a sprawling, unwidely educational
To adults the multiversity is a endeavor. Rather they usually are
huge mob of insolent bearded the result of adjustment to the
kids, protesting often and study- realities of multiversity life.
ing seldom. For example, Michigan legislat-
The state legislature sees it as ors often complain about the slop-
a shield for students acidheads to py attire -- blue jeans and an old
hold orgies and watch dirty mov- shirt -- worn by students. What
ies. they overlook is that these clothes
And students view the multiver- are often a necessity.
sity as an overgrown IBM com- - One girl from a posh suburban
puter where teachers don't teach home owns a lavish wardrobe and
and free speech is met with a still wears ragged blue jeans to
punch in the mouth. class. She does so for practical
Amidst this horde of fault-find- reasons - she has to sit on the
ing fanatics eagerly awaiting a floor in two of her overerowed
chance to exhibit the latest blun- lectures. If the legislators could
der and spotlight today's trauma find money to finance needed
I want to advance the radical no- classroom space, perhaps her
tion that there is a case for the dress would change.
multiversity. The Endless Protest
For anxious parents and vigil- But what about those endless
ant state legislators fail to un- Brt mheand vhs that
derstand that despite occassional protests, marches, and vigils that
excesses the multiversity envir-se the adult generation. "This Week"
onment is a sound one for edu- Magazine, for example, recently
cation. And amidst their often suggested to its millions of Sun-
self-righteous and pent-up pro- .day supplement readers t h a t
tests students often ignore the "America" may be "seeing the
fact that the multiversity can be start of a phenomenon common
a great place for learning. to other parts omenorld-mher
The Changing Character the universities are run by stu-
Much of the criticism leveled dents, many of them professional
against the multiversity comes agitators paid by Communists, and
from alumni who fail to recogn- the faculty, the administrators
ize that the University they once and even the government itself
knew is dead. For as enrollment must bow to their will,,
has more than tripled to 36,000 mTh bowatolelir will."
over the past 20 years, the char- covered student activism closely
acter of the University has here for three years and have yet
changed dramatically. to reyCmrstndehale
As one English professor ex- to me ahCommunist let alon
pais i "he ld nierstyofanyone who is storing. arms to
Michigan that most of us went start a revolution like the stud-
to doesn't really exist any more, most radicanezuela. In fact, the
except maybe on Saturdaymafter- s st ampsto dnt e e know is
noons in the fall. In its place is selling stamps to provide medical
a vibrant and exciting school that aid to Vietnamese civilians in-
resembles most a sprawling city, lured in the war.
-in that its problems are the urban Often the multiversity campus
ischrceie asabedn
problems - transportation, hous- ground for subversive causes Ye
ing, discrimination, mixed popu- a student can hardly be conside
lations with vastly different val- ed unpatriotic simply because he
es, even birth control is a prob- is protesting for peace. As histor-
involvement in the social and po-prasHenry Students hmmanger
itical values of the society atpsesrit:tudegts avemtn
large." same right to agitate and demon-
The pulse of university life has strate against what they think
quickened, academic isolation has unsound policies - even military
ended. Ann Arbor is a boom town ;policies - as have businessmen to
with big money flowing in to build agitate against the TVA or doc-

have the right to show controver-
sial and even bad movies. After
four students were arrested on
obscenity charges for showing
"Flaming Creatures" President
Hatcher said he thought the uni-
versity should permit the showing
of experimental movies because
"if there can't be positive molding
of creativity here, then there is
no place for the University. For
the University then becomes
merely a factory whery you come
to get your bucket filled."
As for LSD, Eugene Stauden-
feler, chief of the Ann Arbor po-
lice detective bureau says "There
is not as much LSD used as some
people think. A lot of people are
afraid to take it because they
don't know what's been put in
the capsule."

the capsule." to suit any generalist, yet special-

As for sex, it's difficult to ob-
tain, reliable ngures. But the best
guess might be that the situation
is not radically different today
than it was in the past.
While the students often 'bear
the brunt of the criticism leveled
against the multiversity, they are
often just as hard on their school
as outsiders.
The Mythical Wall
Though much of what they have
to say about impersonalization has
some basis in fact, much of it is
baseless. For the student willingi
to work a bit, the mythical wall
of impersonalization can give way
to a rich variety of human con-
tact.
Size lets the institution offer
curricular choices broad enough
to suit any generalist, yet special-

It
e
a
fi
d
5l
w
i
5i

28 story apartment buildings.
Eight parking ramps barely halt
a campus parking crisis. Like the
rest of the American power struc-
ture the University is basically for
"rich white students" according to
a Defense Department Equal Op-
portunity study. For the fact is
that there are more Asian stu-
dents enrolled here then Negroes.
The Whipping Boy
When you add 36,000 students
and 3,000 teachers into this en-
vironment with 200,000 alumni
and several million taxpayers
looking on anxiously from the
sidelines, it's not difficult to un-
derstand why the multiversity has
become everyone's favorite whip-
ping boy.
What the critics fail tof under-

tors against Medicare. Business- 4
men and doctors and lawyers, to
be sure, funnel their protests
through respectable organizations
like Chambers of Commerce or
resort to well-paid lobbyists to
express their iscontent. Students
have no such effective organizat-
ions, nor can they support lobby-
ing. The rich and respectable
have had their ways of making
their discontent heard; the poor
and organized must resort to pro-
tests and marches and demon-
strations."
The Dirty Movies
But what about those campus
film societies showing filthy pic-
tures? And isn't everyone on LSD
an nh~ifisr rAiipf TT+

anu coL among"+ rresiaent fiat
cher explains why students should

What's 1±
second Mc
important no
on the chec
you write
YorbnNATIONAL BANK OF I
Member Federal Deposit insurane Corporation

Big Ten Titles

Blue and maize striped ties create an aura of
Sesquicentennial activity. In the spirit of tradi-
tion this unique tie is embroidered with 1817--
U of M--1967. Price $2.50
In keeping with the old University tradition of
"Senior Cane Week" Tice's offers wooden canes
with silver bands reading 1817-M-1967. This
handsome Sesquicentennial item costs $3.95.
TI CE'S MEN'S SHOP
1109 South University--in Campus Village

O

Football
Basketball
Baseball
Out Track
In Track
Swiming
C. Country

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13

MICHIGAN
SOUtVENIRS
Walnut Bookends with Michigan Seal .. ... 5.65
Bronze Bookends with Michigan Seal . 14.50 to 16.50
Ceramic Ash Trays with Bronze Seal ... 4.95 to 9.95
-28 different styles of Sweatshirts............2.98
Children's Sweatshirts ...............1.75 and 2.15
Children's T-shirts, sizes 1-16 ..............1.25
Michigan Baby Booties.....................1.50
Michigan Playing Cards ..........2.20 double deck
Michigan Baby Bibs .................95c to 1.25
Michigan Pennants and Banners...........1.30 up
Stuffed Animals....................... 2.00 up
Michigan Mugs, all sizes...........1.00 to 11.95
----Mail Orders Accepted----
ULRICH'S-Ann Arbor's Friendly Bookstore
549 East University

I

Hockey Golf
A walk through the ancient Gmnsi
halls of Michigan hockey auditor- Tennis
iuM is equivilent to a trip through
the hockey hall of fame. 89cker
Pictures of Such Past greats as Championships ;
Keith Hoffman, John Shirk, Bill co-championship

f " Store H1ours:.
9:00 to 5:30; Mon. & Fri. till 8:30

-r *-

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