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March 07, 1967 - Image 12

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4

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY -SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

Tuesdnv_ Mnrrh 7 1 9F7

Tuesday,- March 7, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY -SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

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Tuesday, March 7, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY - SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

The

Moving

Finger

Sticks

To.

Ecstasy

and

Excel

. f

By MARK R. KILLINGSWORTH
The Moving Finger writes;
and, having writ
Moves on: nor all thy Piety
nor Wit
Shall lure It back to cancel
half a Line,
Nor all thy Tears wash out a
Word of it.
-The Rubaiyat of
Omar Khayyam
OMAR KHAYYAM'S .famous
lines were never quite true. If
history is indeed a set of myths
agreed upon, official history is the
ultimate kind of history. Whole
new eras are born as the official
chronicler spins his tale.
Not that the official historian's
role is an easy one. Quite the con-
trary. William Manchester is only
the most recent example of the
dilemmas and frustrations of a
profession which is, if not the
world's oldest, at least quite ven-
erable.
Michelangelo is said to have
dropped - quite intentionally - a
heavy painting tool close to the
head of his patron, the Pope,
while at work on the Sistine
Chapel. How relieved Oliver Crom-
well's portrait-painter must have
been to hear the Lord Protector
order him to "remark all these
roughnesses, pimples, warts and
everything as you see me!"
Admirers of the University will
no doubt be relieved to find that
the University's most recent offi-
cial history The Making of The
University of Michigan, by How-
ard H. Peckham; Ann Arbor: The
University of Michigan press; (vi
+ 276pp.; $6.50) includes few such
warts. It has all the virtues and
all the defects of an official his-
tory; and it also gives an occa-
sional insight into the University's
greatness.
Peckham recapitulates his theme
at the end of the book:
The University of Michigan
strives to do not one type of
educational task well, but all
types. It early recognized a
three-dimensional challenge:
to disseminate knowledge to
the young, to create knowl-
edge through research and
publication, and to serve the
state's citizens, industry and
government. Assuming these
heavy and interrelated re-
sponsibilities, it has turned a
cable of three stout strands
which girds our society. Its
goal is excellence, unquali-
fied.
Liberal education; research and
the higher education; and service
to society. These are the elements
of the modern multiversity, and
Peckham does a great service
by identifying them so clearly.
The Oxford-Cambridge system of-
fers the traditional liberal educa-
tion; nineteenth-century German
universities offer the ideal of re-
search and higher learning; and

American land-grant colleges sug-
gest the way of service.
As Clark Kerr put it in his fa-
mous Godkin lectures in 1964:
A university anywhere can
aim no higher than to be as
British as possible for the sake
of the undergraduates, as Ger-
man as possible for the sake
of the graduates and the re-
search personnel, as Ameri-
can as possible for the sake of
the public at large-and as
'confused as possible for the
sake of the preservation of the
whole uneasy balance.
Kerr tried in his Godkin lec-
tures to define and describe the
conflicts between these three
functions of a university-educa-
tion, research, service-and he ul-
timately was the victim of these
conflicts.
Peckham, however, only rarely
gives some insight into such con-
flicts, into the "uneasy balance"
which besets not only the Univer-
sity of California but the Univer-
sity of Michigan and all other
large institutions of higher edu-
cation. Such conflicts have no
place in the University's official
history.
Rather, Peckham indicates, the
University's history is composed
largely of "troubles" which do not
reflect the University's structure
itself but rather the foibles and
mistakes of men; and which in-
trude only rarely into its happy
history:
. by 1851 the University
had experienced all the trou-
bles that were to occur again
and again, until it seems as
though they must be endoge-
nous to the nature of a uni-
versity. In brief these cycli-
cal ailments were: (1) politi-
cal meddling by the state leg-
islature, (2) financial squeez-
ing until a crisis is reached,
(3) intrusion of the Board of
Regents into educational op-
erations that are of facul-
ty concern, (4) factionalism
among the faculty, (5) row-
dy or lawless student behavior
outside of class, and (6) irri-
tations between town and
gown. Almost nothing new
can be added to this list of
recurrent maladies since that
time; neither have permanent
solutions been found.
THUS THE OFFICIAL histori-
cal mythology presents itself.
Students alternately display ei-
ther "rowdy or lawless" behavior
or else long-overdue, long hoped-
for and somewhat insufficiently
mature behavior. (A favorite ex-
ample of Mr. Peckham's seems to
be circuses. Students would char-
acteristically gate-crash or dis-
rupt circuses visiting Ann Arbor.
The student newspaper would then
apologize and students would col-
lect money to pay for whatever
was damaged. Like sunspots, such

disruptions came periodically and
fit rather neatly into the theory
that "rowdy and lawless" beha-
vior is about all the problems stu-
dents- are capable of creating.
Perhaps, however, the demise of
the Barnum & Bailey theory of
student behavior was made com-
plete last semester.
The legislature is miserly; the
faculty is (when it takes part in
University affairs at all) factious;
and intrusive. Regents are conniv-

a "University" in 1841; to Presi-
dent Henry Philip Tappan's in-
troduction of the German, re-
search-oriented higher education
concept of a university, to the
dramatic period of public service,
growth, development and decen-
tralization which began with Pres.
ident James B. Angell; to the in-
troduction of heavy Federal re-
search monies during the term of
President Alexander G. Ruthven;
to the present day of President
Harlan H. Hatcher.
Sensitivities about the last thir-
ty years or so are still acute. Con-
sequently the book is, in the words
of one administrator, "pretty care-
ful after about 1935." That, I sup-
pose, is to be expected in official
history. But the book still gives a
very clear idea of how the Uni-
versity got to be what it is and
provides some fascinating insights
into what people were thinking as
it was. getting there.
Angell was the last president to
teach classes, to enroll personally
all the students in the literary
college (!) and answer his letters
himself, in longhand.
Clarence C. Little who liked
Tappan's ideal of faculty research,
nonetheless boosted the much old-
er Oxbridge ideal of, as Peckham
puts it, "a selected student body,
character emphasis, small dormi-
tories and a common curriculum
for the first two years."
Alexander G. Ruthven intro-
duced a decentralized, corporate
organizational form for the, uni-
versity.
Incumbent President Hatcher
has overseen expansion of the Uni-
versity into two new branches at
Flint and Dearborn, and coped
with surprising success with a
two-pronged onislaught of rising
enrollments and inadequate ap-
propriations.
SHORT, Peckham has set
forth in an engaging narrative
which helps explain the things a
university is-which tell us why
Angell Hall is called Angell Hall
and why Tappan Street should be
called Tappan Street. He gives
some insight into the vision, qual-
ity and depth of the men who have

made it great-men like Judge
Augustus 'B. Woodward, Tappan
and Angell. And he records the
seemingly trivial names and dates
and places-like Joe's and the Ori-
ient and the Victors and Varsity-
which give the University a mean-
ing to its constituents which is at
once obvious and undefLable.
THE MAKING OF THE UNI-
VERSITY is an exciting history
largely because-despite the blur-
ring and toning-down of official
chronicling and historical mythol-
ogy-the University is an im-
mensely exciting place.
The University has a huge col-
lection of papyri and a large chest
of the letters of Napoleon and his
generals; it has one of the world's
largest college athletic stadiums,
and the teams to fill it up; and,
quite appropriate in these days
of so-called student power pro-
tests, it also has perhaps the larg-
est collection anywhere of Ameri-
can anarchist literature (which is
almost impossible to inspect).
The University is, in short, quite
universal, and that has always
been its great strength. Its bright
and energetic student body-40
per cent of which is over 21 --
ranges from potheads to grinds,
from activists to Greeks, from
dewy freshmen to short-term post-,
doctorates. The eminent faculty
do, indeed, cover the whole sphere
of knowledge, making the Univer-
sity a true Catholepistemiad.
A friend of mine transferred
from Indiana University, world-
famous for music, told me, "I
knew as soon as I arrived that the
University was 'it'." I agree. The
University swings-and we-who
are in it are all part of a great
adventure.
CAPTURING THIS KIND of
spirit is impossibly difficult;
I know I haven't in these lines
and Peckham doesn't in his. Per-
haps no one can.
But it is the kind of spirit which
is establishing a residential college
next year-a long-overdue, com-
plex, costly and daring gamble on
the possibility of humanizing edu-
(See THE, page 14)

ing (come to thing of it, all these
are historically-sound conclusions
which continue to be present.)
Implicit in Peckham's six points
are a seventh: an all-suffering,
noble, tolerant administration
(which is less valid).
Whether one analyzes history
with Kerr's three faces of a uni-
versity or Peckham's six "trou-
bles," however, the reader will
find Peckham's history is in gen-
eral quite interesting and absorb-
ing, and, most important, almost
always fair and clear.
TE MORE SERIOUS excep-
tions to the book's general val-
ue occur when the Moving Finger
does, indeed, stick - rather than
move on to relatively unpleasant
matters such as the cause celebre
over Dean of Women Deborah
Bacon in the early 1960s.
Dean Bacon maintained a close-
knit, autonomous and very pow-
erful office which had an effect-
ive system of informers operating
in the women's dormitories. In ad-
dition to maintaining what many
thought to be outrageously re-
strictive rules on conduct, dress
and so forth, the office of the
Dean of Women went so far as to
inform the parents of girls who
dated with a boy of another race
or religion.
As a result of a series of disclo-
sures about such practices, a pres-
tigious committee on student af-
fairs was appointed; it advocated
abolishing the office of dean of,
women, strengthening the vice
presidency for student affairs and
giving students the chance to be
"active participants" in getting an
education by involving them in de-
cisions which affect them.
Peckham's bookskips complete-
ly over the Bacon scandal and
condescendingly refers to students
today as having "a predilection
for making a mystery of the deci-
sion-making process... and (the
conviction) that the wishes of stu-
dents are ignored or not known."
Similarly, Peckham treads qui-
etly through the appalling story
of the dismissal of two faculty
members who refused to answer
what even Peckham calls the
"leading questions" of a one-man
House Un - American Activities
Committee hearing. He 'ignores
l'af faire Eugene Power and one
suspects, breathed a sigh of relief
when last semester's student pow-
er crisis erupted-well after his
book went to press.
GENERAL, however, and par-
ticularly when the year in ques-
tion is far frot- the present, ?eck-
ham's narrative is instructive and
his analysis incisive.
He chronicles very clearly the
rise of the University: from smal
and exceedingly humble begin-
nings as a kind of glorified high
school (in 1817); to its start as

WhrestIi ng
While the official history of
wrestling at Michigan starts in
1921, the real story of Wolverine
grappling begins with the 1924-
25 season. It was then that Clif-
ford P. Keen became coach of the
Wolverines.
Even since then the mat mentor
has guided his squads to one of
the most successful won-loss rec-
ords in sports history.
Through the 1965-66 season-
Keen-tutelaged teams had amas-
sed 245 victories against only 8'
losses and 11 ties. Since- the of-
ficial Big Ten championships- be-
gan in 1934, his teams have won
the conference title nine times.
In addition, the past four years
have seen the Wolverineslose only
one meet, at one time having a
string of,34 straight victories.
Perhaps the story of Michigan
wrestling can be told with a recap
of the 1965 Big Ten champion-
ships. The occasion was a special
one - Cliff Keen's 40th year as
coach - and the squad was at
.a peak.
Rick Bay, captain of the squad
that year and now in his first year
as assistant coach, tells the tale:
"When the weekend of the meet
arrived, every one of the 40 teams
had at least one representative.
The list of famous figures includ-
ed University professors, lawyers,
doctors, industrialists.
"With such a gathering behind
us, we knew we had to live up
to their tradition. I've never seen
a squad so charged up, so emo-
tionally high for a meet."
And they accomplished the near
miraculous, too, winning 25 of
their 28 matches, and grabbing
off five Big Ten championships,
one second place, and two thirds.
In the process, the squad com-
piled an amazing 88 points, far
outstripping Michigan State's 38
total.
Bay himself took the 167-pound
title and was named Outstanding
Wrestler in the tournament.
But many other 'special names'
dot the picture of Wolverine wres-
tling. In 1928, for example, four
Michigan matmen formed the nu-
cleus of the American Olympic
team which placed six men in
the finals. Russ Sauer, Al Watson,
Bobby Hewitt, and Ed Don George
brought this honor to Michigan
when the sport was only a half
dozen years old.
George, in addition to gaining
the Olympic gold medal, was ac-
knowledged as the greatest heavy-
weight of his time, and later be-
came heavyweight professional
champion.
The following year marked a
first for the grappling squad, as
they grabbed both the dual meet
championships and the 'unofi-
cial' tournament title for the first
of many such double victories.
Three other tournament victories
fell to Michigan squads before
1934's first official championship.
With all the victories notched
by Michigan squads, owever,
Keen still feels the greatest pride
in what 'his boys' have done when
their college careers are through.
In his more than four decades
of coaching, he has developed
winners - and leaders. And, be-
cause of him, the tradition of
wrestling at Michigan is a win-
ning one.
Gymnastics
Gymnastics has been a varsity
sport at Michigan for only 20
years, but the Wolverines have
compiled one of the best records
in the Big Ten and across the
nation.
The gymnasts, under the lead-
ership of former national high

bar champ, Newt Loken, who re-
vived the sport here in 1947, have
finished first in the Big Ten for
six straight years and are driving
towards the seventh this season.
Gymnastics had earlier been a

big-time sport at Michigan in
1931-32 under the guidance of
Wilbur West. Since Loken brought
the sport back, his athletes have
compiled an amazing record of
124 wins against only 30 losses.
Besides finishing first in the Big
Ten for six consecutive years, the
Wolverines nabbed the NCAA
team crown in 1963. Before their
current conference string started
the gymnasts placed second five
straight years behind Illinois,
which took the Big Ten crown
eleven years in a row from 1950
Loken's astute leadership has
produced 37 Big Ten individual
champs in his 20 years. Besides
that, the gymnasts have netted
ten NCAA titles, eight NAAU
crowns, three consecutive World
championships on the trampoline
and various other titles that total
more than 70.
The gymnasts most amazing
achievements have been on the
trampoline. The Wolverines, star-
ting with Bob Schoendube back
in 1948, have bounced to 11 Big
Ten titles, seven NCAA champ-
ions, six NAAU crowns along with
the three world prizes and the
world championship has been
only running three years.
Ten n is
In tennis coach Bill Murphy's
office nine Big Ten conference
championship plaques adorn the
walls. Coach at Michigan for the
last nineteen years, Murphy has
compiled one of the most impres-
sive records in college tennis.
His teams have finished first
nine times in the last 12 years and
second the other three times. In
1957, his teams captured the
NCAA championship.
"That was the year we had
Barry McKay," Murphy mused.
"That championship was and it

was the best team I've had up
til now."
Team championships in
Ten tennis weren't officially
cided until. 1934.

Since then Michigan has won 12
championships f a r outdistancing
runner-up Northwestern which
has eight. Michigan was also the
second team ever to win four con-
secutive championships in a row
(1959-1962.).
The Wolverine racket-men have
also had some success individually
winning the first singles champ-
ionship six times and the doubles
championship eleven times in the
last forty years. The doubles team
of Mackay and Potter were the
only combination to ever win

un-
Big
de-

The highly-touted Michigan
players have won the team cham-
pionship for the last two years.
Murphy and his brother captur-
ed the doubles championship two
'ears in a row. They were the
only brother's combination to ever
accomplish this feat.
Golf
Like, most sports at Michigan,
golf is one with a winning tradi-
tion even though it hasn't been
overly successful recently.
In fact, Michigan has won 12
championships since the opening
of golf as a varsity sport in 1922,
but has not won the Big Ten since

three consecutive

championships

(1957-1959).r~r.. .:::::: 1952...Meanwhile.Purdue,.second

VIM

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in
ha
ch
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pa
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cri
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in
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wi
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The Daily is a member of the Associated Press and Collegiate Press
Service.
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Published at 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104,
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Average press run-10,000; this issue, 50,000.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich.
EditorialStafff
MARK R. EJLLINGSWORTH, Editor
BRUCE WASSERSTEIN, Executive EditorI
CLARENCE FANTO HARVEY WASSERMAN
Managing Editor Editorial Director
JOHN MBRED=H... ................Associate Managing Editor
LEONARD PRATT .................Associate Managing Editor,
CHARLOTTE WOLTER ........... ...'... Associate Editorial Director
ROBERT CARNEY ................. Associate Editorial Director
BABETTE COHN.................................Personnel Director
ROBERT MOORE...................................... Magasine Editor
CHARLES VETZNER .......................................... Sports EditorI
JAMES TINDALL......................... Associate Sports Editori
JAMES LaSOVAGE........................... Associate Sport s Edtor
CIL AMBERG.. ...... ...........,....Associate Sports Editor
46104 ess Staff..
SUSAN PERLSTADT, Business Manager
JEFFREY LEEDS ............................. Associate Business Manager
HARRY BWOCH................................... Advertising Manager
STEVEN...EW. ............................. Circuation Manager
KLIZABEH BIM.N................................. Personnel Director
VICTOR PTASZNIK................................Finance Manage

A
SPECIAL THANKS
TO
OUR ASSISTANT,
PHYLLIS LEVINSON
AND,
JOSEPH CALCATERRA
KENNETH CHATTERS
ERICA KEEPS
RICHARD KENNEDY
SUSAN PERLSTADT
LUCY PAPP
MARTHA STAH L
ADOLPH WENK
THE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
We are particularly grateful to our adver-
tising manager, Harry .Bloch four all{his
assistance.
Without these people, the Sesquicentennial
Supplement would not have been possible.
ROBERT KLIVANS
WILLIAM KRAUSS

Serving U of M
For The Next
150 Years
w
C
B'
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650

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