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March 07, 1967 - Image 14

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-07
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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY - SFS0111CFNTFhlN1A1 St IPPI FMF:NT

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Tuesday, March 7,'1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY -SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

Tuesday, March 7,1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY - SESQUICENTENNIAL SUPPLEMENT

A

History

of

the

University

Tackling

the

Western

By STEPHEN WILDSTROM
In the Northwest Ordinance of
1787, Congress declared that "Re-
ligion, morality and education be-
ing necessary for good government
and the happiness of mankind,
schools and the means of educa-
tion shall forever be encouraged."
Education was a very early con-
cern in the territory of Michigan,
part of the Old Northwest. Al-
though the city of Detroit was a
tiny village at the time, there
were several men who had a deep

abiding interest
Among them were
Richard, Catholic

in education.
Father Gabriel
pastor of St.

Em
ea18 1 1,
Anne's Church; the Rev. John
Monteith, a Protestant minister
who came west to serve the grow-,
ing Protestant community in Cath-
olic Detroit, and Judge Augustus
Woodward, who designed Detroit's
original radial street plan. A
These three men decided that thew
territory needed a public school was named president and held
system and worked on the terri- seven professorships. Rev. Mon-
torial governor and judges, who teith was vice-president and held
held the legislative function, to s chairs.
establish a school. Throughout the State
The plans bore the stamp of Under the original act estab-
Judge Woodward's rich imagina- lishing the Catholepistemiad,
tion, and the school was to be which soon become known as the
called the Catholepistemiad of University, its English equivalent,
Michigan. In 1817, the school was the professors were empowered to
chartered, establish schools throughout the
As passed by the governor and state. Only a few days after their
judges of the territory, the school appointment, the University estab-
was to consist of "13 'didaxiim' lished public schools in Detroit,
or professorships" with the "didac- Monroe, Mackinac Island and the
tor' of Catholepistemia, or uni- Classical Academy in Detroit. The
versal science, to be president of professors then established a col-
the institution. The president was lege in Detroit which was to be
to receive an annual salary of $25, built on land granted by the In-
the vice-president $18.75, and pro- dians. Thus was born the Univer-
fessors, $12.50. Father Richard sity.

(Continued from Page 16)
ing three touchdown passes in a
21-0 shutout over the Buckeyes
who had vainly hoped to repay the
Wolverines.
In 1929, Kipke returned to
coach Michigan; and, within two
years, Michigan returned to the
forefront of national football. In
the Yost tradition, Kipke spurred
the Wolverines to three consecu-
tive' titles (1931-32-33).
His 1932 team cantered through
its schedule, high-stepping over
Fritz Crisler's nationally-regarded
Princeton team, and finished with
a 'perfect 8-0 record. The Dickin-
son poll, forerunner of the Asso-
ciated Press poll, ranked it num-
ber one in the nation.
It was the last time that the
Wolverines would go undefeated
and their last national title until
Fritz Crisler's nationally-regarded
Michigan team of 1947.
In 1938, Yost talked Crisler in-,
to trading East Coast prestige for
Midwest power. Afso in 1938, the
Hoosier Hammer-Tom Harmon-
raced through opposing linemen
to All-American honors.
In the 1940 team, Crisler had
telescoped' one of the brightest
galaxies of football stars ever.
Along with "Old 98" were Forest
Evashevski, Bob Westfall, Alberti
Wistert and Ed Frutig - all All-
Americans.

Yet, despite its brilliance, Mich-
igan came in second behind Min-
nesota in the championship battle.
"Bierman's Best" played Cris-
ler's Colossus on a dreary Novem-
ber day in Minneapolis.
In the two previous years, Ber-
nie Bierman's Gophers had jinxed
Harmon from crossing the goal
line.
Michigan drove down four times
within the Minnesota five-yard
line. Each time the jinx and the
Gopher line held.
Then, late in the second quar-
ter, Harmon punted to the Minne-
sota 10. The Gopher safety fum-
bled and Westfall recovered. Three
plays later, Harmon flipped a flare
pass to Evashevski and Michigan
led 6-0.
But, in one last moment of
irony, Harmon missed the extra
point.
Minutes later, Bruce Smith ran
an off-tackle plunge 80 yards for
the touchdown, a 7-6 victory and
the 1940 Big Ten title.
Crisler didn't win a conference
championship until 1943, by which
time his star-studded cast had
moved on to bigger roles.
From then until 1947, Crisler
and the Wolverines marked time
as Michigan finished in second
place three years running.
Then, 40 years after Yost's
point-a-minute machines had as-

FRITZ CRISLER BENNIE OOSTERBAAN
1938-1947 1948-1958

BIRD'S EYE VIEW OF THE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS AROUND 1890

In 1821, the governor and judges
of the territory created a univer-
sity ,in Detroit as the legal suc-
cessor to the financially troubled
Catholepistemiad. This new insti-
tution was to be run by a board
consisting of 20 trustees and the
governor.
The board of trustees was em-
powered to appoint professors and
confer degrees. The change in ad-
ministrative structure, however,
did not greatly improve the fi-
nancial situation of the Univer-
sity, and in 1827 the trustees
gave up support of the Classical
Academy.
The administration of the Uni-
versity was again revised in 1837
when Michigan was admitted to
the Union. The Board of Regents

§
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§ m
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® AnnAVborAnnOAbor
Establishe 1921 Estalished/193

was established with 18 members In 1871, one of the University's
who had the same powers entrust- greatest periods began when James
ed to the old trustees. Burrill Angell, then president of
They now needed a site for the the University of Vermont, was
new University. A group of en- named University president. He
terprising speculators had estab- was enticed to come west by a
lished the Ann Arbor land com- salary offer of $4500, $1500 more
pany for development of the town, than his predecessor had received.
- and the company offered 40 acres Angell's final demand before ac-
of rather barren land to the Uni- cepting the job was that inside
versity. The offer was accepted and plumbing be installed in the Pres-
was approved by the Legislature ident's House. Angell was only 42
two days later., at the time he assumed the presi-
Without the Funds dency.
The University, however, still Under Angell, University Hall,
lacked the funds to begin con- which was to be the main ulass-
struction. By 1840, the first con- room building of the University for
struction work had been complet- a half-century, was completed. A
ed: four homes for professors, one new main library building was al-
of which enlarged and remodeled so built, housing some 55,000 vol-
is now the President's 'House on umes.
South University. In 1890, the University, with 2,-
That same summer, Prof. Asa 692 students, became the largest
Grey returned from Europe with school in the country. The school
3,707 volumes, which marked the had also achieved a formidable
beginning of the University Librar- reputation for academic excellence.
ies. 1891 was a major year of tran-
In the fall of 1841, the 24-year- sition in the history of the Uni-
old University finally had its first versity, as it developed from a
classes on the collegiate level. The college to a modern university.
first entering class was made up Until then, Angell had acted as his
of six freshmen and one sopho- own secretary, enrolled all incom-
more, and the school then had two ing students and taught courses.
professors. However, the University was grow-
The first students lived in Mason ing too big for the president's
Hall, a building which stood on the role to remain so informal. After
site- of the present Mason Hall un- Angell, the president became al-
til 1950. They paid a $10 en- most exclusively an administra-
trance fee, were awakened every
morning at 5 a.m. and had to be In 1905, Presid'ent Angell retir-
at chapel by 5:30 (an early sort ed after 34 years of service. Dur-
of daylight savings time was in ing his tenure, the enrollment of
effect; in winter, the boys had the University had more than
until 6:30 for chapel. tripled. Also during his long term
President Tappan in office, The Daily replaced the
PheUnvresieta ng University Chronicle as the .cam-
The University was growing and pus newspaper (1890), the Glee
in the summer of 1852, Henry Club was formed and honorary
Philip Tappan, a distinguished ed- societiesbegan to flourish. Dur-
ucator, became president of theling that time, the Michigan Un-
University. Tappan introduced the ion also was established.
concept that a university should President Hutchins
be a-place for research as well as In 1909, Dean Harry Burns
teaching and also abolished the Hutchins was named president. In
University housing arrangements 1912, the first graduate school sep-
that had been in effect since 1841, arate from the Literary College
consequently establishing one of was established with Prof. Karl
the leading industries in Ann Ar- E. Guthe as dean. Also in 1912,
boar: housing students, the old practice of grading stu-
Tappan's basic conception was to dents as having passed or failed a
remake the University, which had course was dropped in favor of the
been modeled on the English sys- present A through E grading.
tem of higher education, into a In 1920, Marion LeRoy Burton
school based on the Prussian sys- became president. Under Burton's
tem. Tappan also built the as-five-year tenure, the expansion of
tronomical observatory which stillthe University, both in enrollment
stands on the corner of Cather- and physical plant, continued at
ine and Observatory Streets. an unprecedented pace.
However, while Tappan was During Burton's administration,
building the University into a ma- the William Clements Library,
jor school, his relationship with which houses one of the country's
the Regents steadily deteriorated finest collections of historical
and in 1863, he became the first American documents, Angell Hall,
and last University president to be the Architecture and Design
dismissed by the Regents. ; school, University High School and
Tappan was replaced in Octo- the Museums building were com-
ber, 1863, by Rev. Erastus O. 1 pleted.

sembled in Ferry Field, Elliott
Bros. Inc. handcrafted a 10-0 sea-
son, climaxed by a 49-0 Rose Bowl
debacle over Southern Cal.
Pete Elliott had joined the team
in 1945. It took him only two
games to become a tailback -terror
and two more to become a tradi-
tion.
In the fourth quarter of the
Michigan-Illinois game of '45, con-
tested in 70-degree heat, Michigan
was trying to protect a six-point
lead. Wally Teninga and Elliott
had been alternating in the run-
ning slot.
In a series of straight head-
down charges Teninga carried the
ball to the Illini two. But Crisler,
noting the exhausted look on
Teninga's face, called for Elliott
to go in for the touchdown.
Elliott came off the bench, hesi-
tated and said: "If you don't mind,
sir, I'd rather wait until after this
play. This touchdown belongs to
Wally."
Crisler looked up at Elliott and
then looked over at Teninga. "I
guess you're right," he replied.
Teninga scored, Michigan won
and Elliott became the espirit de

corps of the next two years.
Young brother Bump teamed up
at halfback with him in 1946; and
behind them, Michigan rolled to
unbeaten records in 1947-48.
Along with them were quarter-
back Bob Chappius, fullback Jack
Weisenberger and captain Bruce
Hilkene.
Crisler retired to the athletic
directorship in 1949, following
Yost's precedent, and living-leg-
end Oosterbaan succeeded him.
Michigan tied for the title in
1949 and went back to Pasadena
for a 14-6 decision over California
in 1950.
With the '49 season, Michigan's
other-brother era came to an end.
For nearly three decades, the
Wistert brothers had red-dogged
Big Ten quarterbacks and blue-
chipped All-America awards.
In 1933, Francis Wistert gained
All-America recognition; in 1942,
Albert Wistert followed suit; and
in 1948-49, Alvin (Pete) Wistert
duplicated their efforts. All three
were tackles.
Oosterbaan coached for 11
years, producing such pass-catch-
ing notables as flanker Terry Barr

All-time Big Ten Records

Team
MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Minnesota
Michigan State
Wisconsin
Illinois
Purdue
Iowa
Northwestern
Indiana

. Games W
706 498
666 427
644 413
593 374

627
652
625
625

361
364
331
319'

L T Pct.
178 30 .727
194 45 .675
195 36 .669
784 35 .660
224 42 .609)
247 41 .5891
251 41 .566.
277 29 .533'
296 39 .505
320 39 .447

629 298
614 255

l
l

614 255 320 39 .447

Jl..; ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~n littbcm heeprtd ing.. .r"notables as flanker ...... :.:.:: :::v" ..wTerry{ ... Barr.....

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES C
UNION-LEAGUE
Did you know that
(with the merger of the Union an
the University Activities Center
has brought you-for the last 150 y

THE UNION

* HOMECOMING

0
"
e
"

SOPH SHOW
MUSKET
SESQU I-GRAS
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
WORLD'S FAIR
LITTLE CLUB
CALENDAR NOTEBOOKS
LAST CHANCE LECTURES
HATCHER TEAS

" STUDENT-FACU
" FLIGHTS TO EUI
" ORIENTATION
" SYMPOSIUM
" INTERNATIONA
" THE MARKET
* UNION MADNE:
" SCREAMERS
" DISTINGUISHED
" CREATIVE ARTS

Haven, a former professor. In 1868,
the University's enrollment reach-
ed 1,255 students, including two
Negroes, one of them a law stu-
dent. In 1867, the University
Chronicle began publication as the
first student newspaper at thet
University.

- President Ruthven
Burton resigned due to illness
in 1924 and was succeeded by Clar-
ence Cook Little. The University
continued its growth under Little
and the .development of the school
into a major research institution
(Continued on next page)

SO NOW YOU KNOW (for the next

THE LEAGUE

OFFICES IN THE UN IO

..::.....:.,:. ,.::..,.;......

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