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March 01, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-01

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, -MARCII 1, 1997

PAGE TWO TUE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 1967

Segovia: Unique Chordal, Melodic Blend

I

~J!7T~T~~
DIAL 5-6290

I

By L. A. HIRSCHFELD
Slowly and almost regrettfully,E
Segovia crossed the stage at Rack-
ham last night to begin his con-
cert. As he attempted to seat£
himself he discovered that the con-
tour seat on which he was to sit
did not match his own contour.
After several minutes of comic
intercourserwith a stagehandand
some adjustment to the stool, the
concert began.
As expected, hisstechnique and
tone were flawless. He seldom
changed sharply the dynamic lev-
el, which, when combined with an
almost perfect balance between
chordal and melodic passages,
seemed to leave the audience sus-
pended and subdued while ex-
pressing himself quietly and with
impeccable taste in his interpre-
tation.
Unfortunately he needed all his
talents to make his rather poor-
ly chosen program passable. He
began with a "Fantasia and Pa-
vana" by Don Louis Milan which
was originally written for the flute.
The chordal fantasia seemed emp-
ty and detached without the 13
double courses of the lute; while
the pavana seemed directionless
and lacked the suspended har-
monies which the lute provides.
The Sor "Suite" appeared more
cohesive but still seemed as if he
was reading the music rather than
thinking about it. The Paganini
work which followed presented a
technically impressive but musical-
ly empty first section.
As if to apologize for his be-
ginning, Segovia presented three
Baroque pieces which were as
beautifully played as could be de-
sired. The suite by Alessandro
Scarlatti, through which Segovia
moved freely, continued enough to
supply meaning and seemed to
fulfill, rather than to tax, his
talent..
He completed his father and son
pr mentation with a sonata by
Domenico Scarlatti which can only
be described as excellent. Finish-
ing the. first half, he played a
Bach bouree. Again, in this work,
he kept a still and trance-like
calm over the music and audi-
ence by, unlike Julian Bream, not
changing his attack constantly.
Unfortunately, after intermis-
sion he continued alongthe same
lines as the beginning of the con-
cert. The second half consisted of
three pieces of Spanish composers
of the late nineteenth and early
twentieth centuries who displayed
that singular knack of writing
which distinguished some of the
worst neo-Romantic works that
suit a Jose Greco more aptly than
Andres Segovia.
[ -iP

The first consisted of two pieces fully played example of how not
by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, to compose.
and was a unique cross between With this beginning Segovia had
Spanish folk-rock and early Stra- little choice but to end with an
vinsky. Again it required the full Albeniz work of similar merit.
extent of Segovia's ability to pro- Complete with folksy type Spanish
duce a palatable work. melodies swimming blindly in the
Following this, Segovia played middle voice over dissonant pedal
another work which must be a point in bass and soprano.
first in music. Cassodo's prelude Segovia added insult to injury
and sardana was a hybrid made by adding some rather strong and
up of a Spanish neo-Romantic } tear-inducing vibrato which would
melody and harmonic progression have fit well in an ultra Romantic
superimposed over a French im- violin concerto. Almost as if plan-
pressionistic structure a la De- ned. Segovia said during his en-
bussy. The result was a beauti- core that he had mistakenly play-

ed the wrong Albeniz indicating
that even he could not distinguish
between them.
It is very sad that the world's
greatest guitarist nearly spoiled aI
concert by playing the program
which he did; either his popular
demand or his Spanish heritage
must compel this.
Order
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DIAL 5-6290
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41

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A PARAMOUNT PICTURE-TECHNICOLOR
-FRIDAY-
"MONKEYS GO HOME"

ANDRES SEGOVIA, 74-year-old Spanish guitarist, demonstrat-
ed youthful ease before a spell-bound audience at Rackham Au-
ditorium last night. Segovia's program mixed classical guitar and
folk music to display his technical sensitivity.

Monkey
Business
on
Wheels?
WALT
DISNEY
TECHNICOLOR* '

The University of Michigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Production of
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Directed by MARCELLA CISNEY
Starring WILL GEER
featuring
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MARC HENELS 1 1st Floor, Michigan League

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