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January 06, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-06

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 6! 1967

PAGE TWO TIlE MIChIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, JANUARY 6.1967

ARTI
Generation Maintains Inter-Arts Format,
Phh Lithography Add Var*ation

'Female Equality, Not Pills
Causing Sexual Revolution

I-

I

hillel
COMMITTEE MEETINGS
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

EDITOR'S NOTE: The fol-
lowing review was written by
Prof. Marvin Felheim of the
English Department.
After eighteen years of GEN-
ERATION still-succeeds in main-
taining. its variety. The current is-
sue is full of a number of things,
including poetry and prose, photo-
graphy and lithography. The prose
can be further subdivided into
genres: there are three stories, a
variety of critical essays and a.
play. The total is worth more than
the sum of the parts.
The art and the poetry, and the
stories and the subject matter of.
the essays, all deal with and ex-
hibit the most modern techniques
and ideas: pop art on the cover,
elaborate defenses of non-pro-
grammatic music and films of dis-
continuous action. Yet the most
rewarding pieces- in the current
issue are traditional: a charming
wood-cut by ponna Hirt, some fine
lithographs by Lewis Simpson, a
lovely lyric by Claudia Buckolts
and-a challenging one-act play by
Steven Coffman.
Ambitious But Reminiscent
Mr. Coffman's play, "The Spider
and they Mayfly," is, indeed, the.
most* ambitious work in the whole
issue-and it comes off. Reminis-
cent of both Hemingway and
Steinbeck in their early and great-
est periods, it is lean and direct.
It has no new message; it rep-
resents, a fusion of nature imagery
and toghnes (lyricism and real-,
ism) which has been characteristic
of much twentieth-century-writing.
Young grtists. must choose what
to. imitate and in so doing the,
higher they aim the better. What
Mr. Coffman has done, Mr. Simp-
son also accomplishes, a bit more
spectacularly, in his lithographs
which (at least in reproduction)

have the look of Rauschenberg
and Larry Rivers. And that is
good enough.
Theories and Practices
Several of the essays raise is-
sues about current theories and
practices in music and the film.
Ernest Herschel doesn't write very
well; further, he is much too de-
fensive about his subject-music
composed and performed by the
group called "The Great Society."
Ultimately, I am not sure whether
he is not being satirical. What is
one to make of his assertion that
a 'conductor moves through the
Time-Space Warp Interlock"?
On the other hand, Andrew
Lugg's "New Directions in Cinema"
is lucid and persuasive. He begins
with definitions; he doesn't as-
sume that his readers are all
squares and/or fools. His account
of such exciting ventures as Mil-
ton Cohen's Space Theater and
of the development of Mood Cine-
ma from Chaplin to Andy Warhol
is both informative and critically
relevant.
Not So Provocative
Other aspects of the magazine
are not so provocative. The fiction
is disappointing, but that is as
true of ESQUIRE as of GEN-
ERATION. The three stories suffer
from self-consciousness and sen-
timentality.
As a whole, the poetry selec-
tions are good or, frankly, up to
standard. GENERATION has had
a long history of publication of
first-class student poetry (in vol-
ume fifteeen, there was an an-
thology of distinguished poems
from the first ten years of the
magazine). The present works
keep up that level; they are all
lyrics; they all succeed; they all
have appropriate literary connec-
tions with the main stream of cur-

rent American poetical practices.
Emerson Critique
Finally, there is a good essay
on Emerson's theory of art by Bill
Kloss. Mr. Kloss in his completely
appropriate attack on Emerson's
failures might have added that
Emerson's bland prose style con-
tributes greatly to his other short-
comings. Isolated in Concord and
far too deeply embedded in a pure-
Romney Unsu
Confers. on C4
DETROIT (P)-George Romney,
still uncommitted but testing the
political winds, made plans yester-
day for a speaking tour of the
west and a "long, hard look" at the
1968 GOP presidential nomina-
tion.
Meanwhile, another of the
Michigan governor's top aides
resigned a state post to help Rom-
ney take that look and arrive at
a decision.
Dr. Walter De Vries, who heads
research and development for the
governor's office, will resign next
week, Romney told a news con-
ference Wednesday.
"I expect to rely on him im-
portantly in taking a long, hardl
look at what I'm looking at," Rom-
ney said, referring to the Repub-
lican presidential nomination.
De Vries is expected to conduct'
research into campaign issues,
helping Romney formulate his po-
sition on national questions.
The governor repeated at the
news conference his statement
that he has not decided whether
to seek the presidential nomina-
tion of his party.
Campaign Fund
Romney also turned aside ques-
tions about reports of a huge cam-
paign fund aimed at financing a
drive for the presidency when he
decided to declare himself in the
running.
But he did say De Vries would
be paid "by a private fund -- by
those who have indicated they are
willing to help me organize to ex-
plore what I am exploring."
De Vries is the third Romney
aide to resign a major state posi-
tion in the past two months-all
of them apparently to lay ground-
work for a presidential drive by
the governor.
Left Posts
Robert J. McIntosh left his post
as director of the Michigan De-
partment of Commerce Nov. 17,
reportedly to set up a Romney-
for-president office in Washing-
ton, and John Feikens, co-chair-
man of the Michigan Civil Rights
Commission, quit two weeks ago

ly literary tradition, Emerson was
a most inept art critic. He , did
recognize the excitement of Whit-
man's poems but he failed to look
about for other evidences of art.
The variety of the current GEN-
ERATION is a useful comment, for
it reminds, us how far the arts
in America have come and it sug-
gests how thoroughly relevant the
arts are in present-day life..
ire About 68;
o-nmi tment
amid talk that he would perform
similar duties.
Romney has gained the lead in
speculation about GOP presiden-
tial possibilities since his strong
showing in the November elec-
tions.
He won re-election to a four-
year term as governor.
Coattails Victory

i
f
f
t
t
1
r
i
l
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:

ORGANIZATION NOTICES

In the process, he carried U.S.1
Sen. Robert P. Griffin, R-Mich.,
to victory over former Michigan
Gov. G. Mennen Williams and re-
duced a Democratic stronghold on1
the State House of Representa-
tives to a 55-55'standoff while the,
GOP gained control of the State
Senate.
Shortly after the election, Rom-
ney vacationed in Puerto Rico with4
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller of New
York, and later spent some time
talking with former Presidentt
Dwight D. Eisenhower.t
Primary Preparations
The first overt move by Romney
staffers for the 1968 nomination
followed quickly. National GOP
committeeman John Martin of
Michigan said he would go to New
Hampshire to make preparations
to enter Romney in the presiden-
tial primary election.
Romney killed this move, how-
ever, saying he did not want it
to look like he had tossed his
hat in the ring.
Sandwiched between the resig-
nations of McIntosh and Feikens
came a New York conclave among
top aides and long-time friends to
discuss Romney's prospects and
reportedly to "urge him to become
a candidate."
In Washington, meanwhile, The
Washington Post said reports were
circulating in the capital that in-
ternal disagreement had developed
among leaders of 'the informal
Romney-for President organiza-
tion.
The Post's political writer, David
S. Broder, said the disagreements
were said to explain the "indefi-
nite postponement of the opening
of a national Romney-for-Presi-
dent office in Washington."

DETROIT (AP) - Public accept-
ance of equality for women-not
the birth control pill-is credited
by a noted birth control expert
as the cause of a sex revolution
on college campuses.
"People want to tar and feather
us because they feel the pill is
the responsible agent for the whole
thing," Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher
told a news conference before
speaking to the Planned Parent-
hood League Wednesday in De-
troit.
Citing the new equal rights for
women in all areas, as the cause,
he said,"Chastity among women is
no longer the great virtue that it
was 10 to 15 years ago.
Do Anything?
"A thousand years ago when I
was in colelge," he said, "the man
could do anything he wanted but
the woman could not. Now women
have full equality in sex.:
Dr. Guttmacher is president of
Planned Parenthood-World Pop-
ulation and former director of the
Department of Obstetrics and,
Gynecology 'at New York's Mt.
Sinai Hospital.
Dr. Gutmacher said the rapid
change in sex habits of American
youth began a few years before
the pill was introduced as a con-
traceptive in 1960, becoming pop-
ular in 1962-63.
Dr. Guttmacher said he supports
the new standard but said it must
be accompanied by sexual respon-
sibility.
No Coercion
"No one should be coerced into
a sexual relationship to please
another," he said, "and no preg-
nancy should result."
"The coeds are quite faithful
during the romance," he said. "The
occasional college girl who has
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many amours is regarded disfavor-
ably."
He said the chief deterrent to
sexual freedom remains ethics.
Conscience and Ethics
"Standards and the conscience
of the individual-these are sub-
tle thing that spring from the
home environment," he said.
"The fear of pregnancy of vene-
real disease and the censorship of
peers are secondary and the pill
has played only a minor role."
A truly effective birth control
program should "seek out and find
which young people are involved in
back-alley abortions and unwant-
ed pregnancies," he said. "These
are the tragedies."

Inter Faith
Activities
Wednesday
Night Lecture
Series
1429 HILL STREET

REFRESHMENTS

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*.* 0COMPLETE SHOWS at 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00 P.M.

'WATCH YOUR GIRL! GUARD YOUR GOLD! HOLD YOUR JEWELS! T4I Z O 9
.-gIMsio

SUNDAY, 4 P.M.

A

MONDAY, 4 P.M.

You caught f"e"Pussycat...Now chasN Ftox:
A EM E SfslE*$,

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is. available to offi-
cially recognized and registered student
KA cross
Campus
FRIDAY, JAN. 6
Noon-Leslie. A. Fiedler, Writer-
-Residence, will be the guest
aker at the Guild House for
. .nch.
8.00 p.m.-"Youth Culture and
the End of Western Man" will be
the lecture topic of Leslie A. Fied-
ler, Writer-In-Residence, at a lec-
ture in Rackham Lecture Hall.
TUESDAY, JAN.10
8:00 p.m.-The Russian Circle
will sponsor a Soviet film "The
Fate of Man" by Sholokhov in the
Multipurpose Room at the UGLI.

organizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
* * .*
U. of M. Folk Dance Club, Meeting,
Fri., Jan. 6, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.
Ifillel Foundation, Deli House, an eve-
ning with Leslie A. Fiedler, Jan. 8, 5:30
p.m., 1429 Hill. Call 663-4129 for reser-
vations.
* * * .
Hillel Foundation, Sabbath service,
Jan. 6, 7:30 p.m., 1429 Hill; Dr. Morton
Siegel, director, United Synagogue Com-
mission on Education, will speak on:
"Is There a New Morality?"
Guild House, Friday noon luncheon,
speaker: Leslie Fiedler, U. of M. Schol-
ar in Residence, Jan. 6, 12-1 p.m.,
Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Guild House, Annual Guild House Re-
treat, Jan. 6-8, Fri. evening-Sun. noon,
Saline Valley Farms, Saline, Mich.
(Transportation provided from and to
Guild House.) For reservations, call 662-
5189.
38'* * *
Square Dance Club, Dance, Jan. 7, 8-
11 p.m., Women's Athletic Bldg. All
students, faculty and staff invited to
join the fun, at our first dance of the
semester. No experience necessary.

..:e.._

cIC b* ArdIII

I
i

anal t es byNNOLSIMON Prwuced iy JOHN BRYAN Directed by VITIORIO DE SICA music ouercm
BR'dII IXIE K LK Prc 1 aPANAVISION COLOR by Deluxe "ed UNITED ARTISTS
x DA R HFTER THE FOR UtOBYTHE HOrLS RHO ETER SELLERS-ANDORIGIAL SOUN TRACK ALBUM-OR UNITED ARTISTS RECORDS
Next: Dean Martin.-* Ann Margaret in "MURDERERS' ROW"

F"

THIS ONE IS
TRULY DIFFERENT!
There is a wide selection of films today,
playing in theatres for the pleasure of the
selective movie-goer. They cover the spectrum
from suspense to drama to comedy. But there
is a unique motion picture that
is different from all of these.
It may be said that it is the only film of its
kind. It is called "Mademoiselle." Certainly
many films-have probed the mysterious psyche
of woman, but this courageous picture reveals
a shockingly different aspect of the female.
Jean Genet's story shows what can happen
to a woman who is loveless.
As the film plunges into the roots of her evil,
it is unflinching and unsparing, with a realism=
no other motion picture has ever attempted.
Jeanne Moreau magnificently porotrays this
helpless woman who unleashes her frpstrations
in a turbulent night of love with an .itinerant
worker. Tony Richardson's direction is hailed
as better than his widely acclaimed "Tom Jones."
See "Mademoiselle." You will never forget it.

NOW SHOWING

I

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Put your hands in yi
If you find anythin
metro- goidwyn- mayer
as r:
co-starring
lanajinen ick sha
nofarfgllrm. i ..i

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cur pockets.
g Missing.,
Penelope
fi probably,
WON
.leading the merriest men on the
hottest chase from safe to sofa
ii~oe. ..te word's most
beat if ak
wli
5
U 1IIIfly,

10

"SUPERIOR! WONDERFUL PELL-MELL
ENJOYMENT, IMMENSELY ORIGINAL!
THE WAY IT IS WITH THIS NEW BREED
OF YOUNG PEOPLE RACING CRAZILY
THROUGH A CHANGING WORLD:'
-Bosley Crowther. N.Y Times
COLUMBIA PICTURES i'mw
JAMES MASON ALAN BATES" LYNN REDGRAVE
o v s CHARLOTTE RAMPLING ScmeepTay MARGARET FOR$TERand PETER NICHRS on a tk nobMARGARET ORSTER
. r ROBERT A.GOLDSTONa OTTO PLASCHKES seow bSILVIO NARIZZANO Arw{ats pro Ewe
7, 9, 11--Friday
5, 7, 9, 11-Saturday
5, 7, 9-Sunday

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