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February 23, 1967 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-23

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1967

PAGE- SiX THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1967

Submit 4-Page Articles
for a booklet on
STUDENTS AND UNIVERSITY
DECISION MAKING

UNANIMOUS VOTE:
Committee Agrees To Seat Powell

Study Group Urges
Price Control Board

+I

To: Guild House
802 Monroe

662-5189

ART FILM:
Ingmar Bergman's
VIRGIN SPRING

Sat., Feb. 25
NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson

7& 9 P.M.

WASHINGTON 0P) - A select
House committee reached unani-
mous agreement late yesterday on
a recommendation that Adam
Clayton Powell be seated, cen-
sured and docked a portion of his
pay.
Although Chairman Emanuel
Celler (D-N.Y.), told reporters
after another long day's meeting
that "we are still deliberating this
matter," it was learned" that all
but a few minor details had been
agreed on.,
The principal punishment the
group plans to recommend to the
House is that Powell be forced to
pay back government funds he
allegedly converted to his own use.
This is expected to be in the
neighborhood of $35,000.
Rep. Claude D. Pepper (D-Fla) ,
still proclaiming he favors Pow-
ell's expulsion 'from the House,
told reporters he plans to sign the
report recommending Powell be
seated and censured.
"As the report will be written
I am going to sign it but that de-
pends on how it is written," Pep-
per said as he left the meeting at
midafternoon en route to a Flor-
ida speaking engagement.
Celler confirmed that the com-
mittee's recommendations will bc
unanimous. "Every member will
sign the report," he said. The re-
port is expected to contain a sec-
tion spelling out Pepper's conten-
tion that the controversia' Harlem
Democrat be expelled.
Pepper said the report will take

I

50c admission

note of "differences of opinion"
within the committee, assigned to
consider allegations of official
misconduct against Powell and
recommend a course of action.
The nine-member special com-
mittee planned to meet again this
morning to review a final draft of
its report and to sign the docu-
ment formally for submission to
the House later in the day. The
group will hold a news conference
this afternoon to detail its rec-
ommendations.
.House action is expectedI next
Tuesday or Wednesday.
In working out its final report
the committee omitted a proposal
that Powell lose the power to hire
and fire m nmbeibsof his personal
staff.
Stiffer Punishment
Likewise, the committee appar-
ently decided not to recommend
some of the stiffer punishments
suggested, such as taking away all
of Powell's congressional senior-
ity and forcing him to give up his
plush Rayburn Building office
suite.
The recommendation to dock
part of, Powell's $30,000-a-year
salary is based on a law permit
ting Congress to withhold pay
from members to satisfy claims by
the government.
The bulk of the money Powell al-
legedly owes stems from approxi-
mately $30,000 paid in salary to
his wife after passage of a law in
July 1965, that staff members
work either in Washington or the
congressman's home state.

Mrs. Powell, who lives in Puerto The rest of the money the con-
Rico, testified she received only mittee claims Powell owes is based
two pay checks during this period on a number of plane trips to Mi-
before being dropped from the ami by Powell and staff members
House payroll last month. She of the. Committee on Education
and the congressman are es- and Labor en route to Powell's
tranged. fishing retreat on the Bahamas
Testimony before an earlier in- isle of Bimini.
vestigation of Powell's activities Powell formerly headed the La-
indicated the money had been bor Committee but was stripped of
banked in Powell's House account the chairmanship by House Dem-
by a staff member at the con- ocrats at the start of the current
gressman's direction. Congress.
GHETTO EXPERIENCE:
Father B0yd SayTs
Negro RiosUeu

WASHINGTON (IR-Congress is
being urged to create a board that
could move in with some authority
when wage or price increases
threaten to fan inflation.
The latest suggestions come
from Walter P. Reuther, presi-
dent of the United Auto Workers
and from the National Planning
Association, a privately financed
economic study group.
They were aired at Senate-
House Economic Committee hear-
ings on President Johnson's annu-
al report on the economy, at a
time when the government is pon-
dering what to do about a penny-
a-gallon increase in gasoline
prices.
Outstanding Feature
An outstanding feature of John-
son's economic report is some-
thing that isn't there: a specific
percentage guide for labor and
management to keep increases in
line with rising productivity.
During 1966 the administration
had suggested 3.2 per cent as a
general guide. Organized labor, by
and large, did not accept the fig-
ure and some major collective
bargaining settlements ignored it.
Undersecretary of the Interior
Charles F. Luce noted in discuss-
ing the gasoline price increase
with a reporter Tuesday that the
government now has no specific
price control authority. He said

,

Uncle Russ presents a
Benefit Dance Concert for the
GRETA GARBO HOME
FOR WAYWARD PARENTS
Here's your chance to help Parents have
some good clean fun without topless or
Go-go girls--at the'Grande.
Turn on Moat and Dad and hang up
your hang-ups together. Love! '
Fri. nite: Scott Richard Case
The Vpillage Beaus
Sat. nite: Jagged Edge
The D.S.R.
ran4e Rafto0m
Grand River at Beverly
1 block South of Joy Road
*You must be 17 and prove it
Birth Certificates and driver's licenses only.
Parents admitted free when
accompanied by a minor.

By JIM HECKl
"Demonstrations serve no pur-
pose, but riots work," Father Mal-
colm Boyd told a Sunday after-
noon crowd of 500 in the Uniont
Ballroom.
Father Boyd, an Episcopalian
priest speaking in UAC's sympos-
ium series on "The Urban Ghet-
to in America," has learned the
problems of the urban poor first-
hand. Although Boyd has lived in
ghettos in all the major U.S. cities
he said he could "only present
personal experience-no solutions."
Father Boyd spoke mainly about
the Watts riot. He quoted a Negro
leader as saying, "We're all just
fed up." Father Boyd claimed the
riots were not initiated by "hood-
lums" and "criminals."
"Social workers had been treat-
ing people like animals," he re-
marked. "Stores gave inferior mer-
chandise. Day-old bread was 15'
cents more in Watts than in Bev-
erly Hills." Proposition 14 of the
City Council had just been passed,
which said in effect that Negroes
couldn't live next to whites in
Watts.
He commented that one Negro1
boy he talked with was told by'

his high school teacher, "All you
need is a shop course."
Father Boyd said that demon-
strations serve no purpose, but that
"riots get through." He said after
the riots, Watts got 80 per cent
of the poverty money alloted for
that section of California.
He said that Negroes have no
figurehead, now, and are discon-
tended with Martin Luther King.
He quoted one Negro as saying,
"King talking to Negroes sounds
like Johnson talking to the U.S."
"You all know, there is no black
power," he said putting down, his
notes. "There is no male Negro
figurehead anymore."
"And yet, whites have reacted
violently to 'black power.'"
Father Boyd said he was dis-
guested with all the talk about
non-violence since, "the only vio-
lence is white violence."
At one point Father Boyd con-
tended, "You come to a Univer-
sity that doesn't train you for the
outside world." The audience re-
sponded by clapping and cheering,
and he followed up his comment
by saying he believes there are
"many unintellectuals, here."

Increase in imports with a view to
discouraging higher prices.
Johnson's 1967 economic report,
while not suggesting any specific
guideline figure, reasserts the
principle of keeping increases in
line with productivity.
Presumably, as economist Ger-
hard Colm told the Senate-House
committee, the intention is to
continue the present practice by
which the President or his princi-
pal economic adviser tries to talk
business and labor spokesmen Into
observing a standard.
But Colm asked, "Does the Pres-
ident believe that the present ne-
cessarily vague formulation will
really have an effect on any busi-
ness decision or union demand? He
also questioned whether the at-
tempt to formulate guides for
specific industries might not take
up an inordinate amount of the
time of the Council of Economic
Advisers.
Productivity Board
He proposed setting up, perhaps
in the projected combined Com-
merce-Labor Department, a price-
wage - productivity board. The
President could refer to it the
problem of industries he would
specify as crucial for economic
growth and price stability.
The board then would establish
special committees to spell out
guidelines for these industries. The
President could pass the reports
to Congress which, in extreme
cases, could take legislative action.
Reuther's proposal for a price
wage review board was even more
detailed. If established by law, he
said, such a board could have au-
thority to hold hearings and pow-
er to subpoena witnesses and rec-
ords.
rdCorporation Requirement
Corporations in a position of
price leadership in a key industry
would be required to give the
board 60 days' notice of any in-
tended price increases. The board
could then conduct hearings and
make determinations which, how-
ever, would not be binding on the
corporation, but would rely on
public opinion to bring about com-
pliance.
He envisioned also the post of
consumer counsel to represent the
interests of consumers at review
board proceedings. Corporations
subject to the procedure could
plead that price rises were forced
by union, demands, in which erase
the union as well as the corpora-
tion would be summoned to the
hearing.
Reuther sugested a similar
procedure could be worked out on
a voluntary basis, using existing
agencies, even without legislation.

jI

i

one action being considered is

an

U', Ii

/111/lel

SABBATH ,SERVICE
Tomorrow at 7:15
JOHN PLANER, Cantor and
The HillelChoir directed by
STEVEN OVITSKY will chant the
Service. JOAN SPITZER, organist
After tomorrow, Sabbath Services
will resume March 10

Across
Campus,
THURSDAY, FEB.23
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
presents Carl Dreyer's-"Ordet" in
the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m. - The School of Music
presents Gounod's opera "Faust"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
FRIDAY, FEB. 24
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
presents Carl Dreyer's "Ordet" in
in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m. -- The School of Music
presents Gounod's*opera "Faust"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
presents a flute recital by Alex-
ander Le Seur in the North Cam-
pus Recital Hall.
SATURDAY, FEB. 25
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
presents experimental dance films
in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m. - The School of Music
presents Gounod's opera "Faust"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.,

THE INDIVIDUAL AND HIS RELIGION
(A PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION)
TONIGHT: THE NATURE OF FAITH
GUILD HOUSE, 802 Monroe Street, 7:30 P.M.
A seminar in religion, led by Lloyd W. Putnam,
and open to all students.

I

Subscribe to The Michiran. Daily

1429 Hill Street

All Welcome

Sponsored by:
2282 SAB

The Office of Reliigous Affairs
764-7442

Pr/ ----t-. i---- - . L -.I . -- - - . a N 1- - . - I r I.

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