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February 23, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-23

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PAGV TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN IJAILY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1907

OPENING MARCH 14:
Film Adaptation of 'Ulysses'
May Face Censorship Battle

Hatcher Calls Rapoport Irresponsible

G

(Continued from Page 1)
himself spoken to the Regents
concerning The Daily at the meet-
inp. "I did not speak from any
cotes. I don't even recall exactly
what I did say. Vice President
Ctnler did most of the talking."
Radock explained that he told
the Regents of a meeting he had
with the Senate Advisory Com-
mittee on University Affairs
(UACUA) in which he told SACUA
that he felt SACUA should accept
the request of the Board in Con-

and the possibility of a Daily-
Board standoff, Radock replied,
"I don't recall whether they had
any response to that."
"As nearly as I can recollect,"
Goebel continued, "the President's
remarks were directed that mor-
ning to this problem: that the
writings in The Daily should be
handled more responsibly than
they have been."
'Some Discussion'
"I recall some discussion of The

ByLISSA MATROSS
James Joyce's "Ulysses," which
fought for its life in the United
States as a novel in 1933, and won,
might have to fight the battle
al--over. again as a film.,
Walter Rede-Sterling; Inc.,
which is distributing the. film in
the United States, plans to hold
simultaneous premieres in 135
theatres throughout the country
on March 14. The film will be
shown in Ann Arbor at the Fifth
Forum from March 14-16.
The film passed uncut through
United States Customs on Feb. 15
After no more than 15 minutes of
discussion among customs officials
and representatives of the United
States District Attorney's office.
Irving Fishman, director of the
Custom's Agency's division of im-
ports compliance said that recent
court decisions protect all films
except those "completely without
socially redeeming value."
But in Chicago, where the police
department has a film review sec-
tion, .distributors of the movie
have refused to show the film in
advance. to the police censors, the
film faces trouble. Sgt. Robert

Murphy of the review section says
that if the film is not reviewed, it
faces a possible crackdown. Asked
if he ever read the book, Murphy
said, "No. But I guess it wouldn't
have any effect on a man of my
age. I'm 56 and I have 11 kids and
12 grandchildren. I don't even
need the Catholix Index of Books
to keep me straight.
"From what I hear, Joyce was
in a class with that fellow Bren-
dan)'Behan, with no concept of
what's obscene."
In the court decision of 1933,
Judge John M. Woolsey ruled in
Federal Court that the book was
not obscene, noting that while the
novel "is somewhat emetic, no-
where does it tend to be an aphro-
disiac."
Regardles of Woolsey's decision
on the book, the film faces the
possibility of a legal clash in
Maryland, the only state with a
Board of Motion Picture Censors.
An executive of the board said un-
less the film is submitted in ad-
vance the board would be required
to act under the law. The executive
was quoted as saying, "It (the
film) may be a classic, and I'm no
prude, but there is a limit."

The director of the film, Joseph
Strick, obtained the rights to the
novel in 1962. Strick, whose pre-
vious films include Jean Genet's
"The Balcony," immediately began
work with producer Walter Reade,
Jr. Strick wrote the screenplay
with Fred Haines, and started
filming in July, 1966, in Dublin
on the actual locations described
by Joice.
The film is also scheduled fori
showing in England on the same
March 14 date. However, the
British Board of Film Censors:
has ordered 29 portions of dia-{
logue and two scenes snipped. In!
response to the Board action,;
Strick has announced that the;
omitted words will be printed in
a leaflet and given to the aud-
ience before the movie starts so
that no one is "cheated of the full
experience."
The film stars Barbara Jefford,
one of England's leading Shake-
spearian actresses, as M o 11 y
Bloom; Milo O'Shea, a popular
actor in Ireland, as Leopold
Bloom and Maurice Roeves, of
Sir Laurence Olivier's National
Repertory Company, as Stephen
Dedalus.

discussed this question in a gen-
eral fashion in relation to the
image of the University and its
impact on the alumni," she said.
Asked last night if Hatcher had
informed the Regents of his re-
marks to Cooperrider about Rapo-
port, University Secretary Hilde-
brandt, who was at last Friday's
meeting, said, "I have no com-
ment." He would not elaborate.
Executive Vice President Marvin
L. Niehuss said that he does not:
recall any discussion of Daily ap-
pointments but was "in and out
of the meeting" to answer phone
calls and work on a project in
Flint and may have missed re-
marks about The Daily.
'Did Not Mention It',
Regent Frederick C. Matthaei-
of Ann Arbor said yesterday, "I
did not hear him (Hatcher) on
the matter ofThe Daily," adding,
"he did not mention anything
about it in my presence" on Fri-
day.

HILLEL DELI HOUSE
For A Very .Men-)y
"UM" Birthd)y
JOEL SAXE
Folksin er
This Sunday at 5:30
CALL 663-4129 for Reservations

'1

trol for an investigation of "the ' Daily on Friday morning, which is
mechanism of the Board itself, natural since we are all deeply
withoat hurting the editorial free- concerned with the problem," said
dom o The Daily." Mrs. George J. Huebner, Regent
Asked whether the Regents hqdM
any response or comments to his from Bloomfield Hills.
statements on Daily appointments "But I remember only that we
Program LAST 2 DAYS
Information I 1;:00 3:00
NO 2-6264 5:00 7:05
9:10
GEORGE SEGI. AHEC GUNNESS
20th Century Fox MAX VON SMOW
VAN FOXWEU. S SENTA JLDUL
} A PRODUCTION of
PANAVISION' commaDELUXE

1 .00 members
1429 Hill Street

1.25 others
lA Welcome

A

Radical Education Project's Conference
Re-evaluates Trends in American Society

Saturday: "A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS"

I

8:00Y\and
}4n
- ~ ~ ~ 4}:
- .~ '". }

I

'9

By MIKE THORYN
"The main thrust" of the Radi-
cal Education Project (REP) con-
ference held at Princeton Univer-
sity last weekend, "was to re-eval-
uate a number of trends in society
and the movement," said Mike
Goldfield, one of the directors of
.REP.
The ,950 people who attended
the conference spent much of their
time listening to the presentation
of papers and attending work-
shops.
One of the principle papers pre-
sented, Goldfield said, dealt with
agencies of. change, identifing
trends in the organizing and the.
political activity of middleclass
professional groups. Previously,
such groups as teachers and social
workers, Goldfield said, consider-
ed it unethical or unprofessional to
organize unions.
"Now, much of their impetus
comes from the experience of the
civil rights movement which has
shown many groups of people that
if they organized around demands
Order*
Your
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Today
764-0558

they feel are legitimate, they can
get results," Goldfield said.
Teachers in New York and
Michigan struck recently over
salary demands and freedom in
teaching courses.
Goldfield added that profes-
sional people don't have the _stake
in their work that they formerly
had. Few of the people who work
in the rapidly growing technical
professions for a corporation like
IBM have any sort of commit-
ment to the work of the corpora-
tion itself.
Greg Calvert, national secretary
of Students for a Democratic So-
ciety spoke about the difference
between radicals and liberals.
He said that liberals think
things are all right for themselves
and are ready to take on the
battles of others.
Radials Calvert continued, see
inadequacies in the present so-
n M

ciety which mean failure to ful-
fill tae human needs for both
themseves and others.
REP s puipose is to raise the
level of discussion and debate
within the New Left and to pro-
vide eduebtlonal materials and
resources to local groups, such as
SDS chapterts Current work in-
cludes the ci ganization of summer
research projects, and the comple-
tion of a book called "Beyond Dis-
sent," to be published by Double-
day.

KEEP FREEDOM
IN YOUR FUTURE WITH
BONDS

r

5 ACADEMY

AWARD NOMINATIONS INCLUDING

BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR!

Cinema H1
presents
JULIE CHRISTIE'S
Academy Award
Winning Performance
DARLING
Also starring
LAWRENCE HARVEY
DIRK BOGARDE

I

Get your tickets NOW
at Barbour Gymnasium
Admission: $1.25 evenings, $1.00 matinee
Co-sponsored by UAC

I

(RECOMMENDED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES)
MICHAEL CAINE IAFIE
MILUCENT MARTINe JULIA FOSTER.!JANE ASHER'SHIREYANNE FIELD
VMEN MERCHANT ELEANOR BRON * IN SHELLEY WINTERS AS RUBY
TECHNICOLOR'TECHNISCOPE'

I

I

Y

c

DIAL
5-6290

Shows at 1,

3, 5, 7 and 9 P.M.

ii

a
11

I

"Don't bring sex
into this. It's bad
enough being a
minister." Anything Goes

FRIDAY
and
SATURDAY
Auditorium A
Angell Hall

7 and
9:15p.m.
50c

A Carlo Ponti Production
Michelangelo Antonioni's
first English language film.

I

"AN EVENING TO CHERISH.I
Mounting joy beyond anything you might expect. Radiant!"
W. TELEGRAM
"THE TOUCH OFGRANSI
A warm portrayal of Robert Frost, an evening when the poet spins out his own
story,the sweet and the following bitter, the tragedy and triumph, in words
creating laughter, but even more often tears."
N.Y. TIMES
"MAGNIFICENT! MEMORABLE MAGIC
CUE
"FROST'S TRUE VOICE SPEAKS IN ALL ITS LYRIC CLARITY."
HERALD TRIBUNE

4

I

I

I.D. Required

TONIGHT
and
TOMORROW
ORDET
(The Word)
dir. Carl Dreyer, 1955,
Danish, subtitles.
Young former
obsessed by the
idea that he is
Christ.
SATURDAY, SUNDAY
DANCE FILM
FESTIVAL:
IN COOPERATION WITH
THE ANN ARBOR DANCE
THEATRE.
SATURDAY, 7:00 & 9:05
Experimental Dance

I

I

The University of Michigan r
Professional Theatre Program \-"
--.
Production of
-.-- By DONALD HALL
Directed by MARCELLA CISNEY
Starring WILL GEER

4

SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Thursday 7, 9

M . '' r~i, fi~pYf -.. ;'rt . . t-w

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