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February 21, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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AAU Issues Further Reprisals

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F

NEW YORK - The Amateur
Athletic Union, in a surprising
move yesterday, said foreign ath-
letes who were suspended for com-
peting in an unsanctioned track
meet are ineligible for all com-
petition in the United States, even
strictly collegiate competition.
Michigan athletes affected are
Alex McDonald, from Jamaica,
and John Reynolds, from Canada.
Previously, the AAU had said
the foreign athletes, who are stu-
dents at American colleges, were
ineligible for open competition
that comes under AAU jurisdic-
tion. They were suspended for
participation in the U.S. Track
and Field Federation meet here
Feb. 10.
But the new claim, which could
affect the local metropolitan in-
tercollegiate championships this
week, is that these athletes may
not even compete in their college
meets.
"We withdrew the permission
we had granted them to compete
in this country," said Col. Donald
Hull, executive director of the
AAU. "They must have our in-
vitation, our permissioin and our
approval to participate in the
United States."
It is not completely clear what
will happen if the disputed ath-
letes compete in the local cham-
pionships, which are set for Fri-
day with the field events on Tues-
day.
New York University is the only
team affected with three runners
from Barbados who have been
declared ineligible by the AAU.
They are Lenny Harewood, -Edric
Jordan and Bertrand Cantwell.
NYU Coach Joe Healy said, "Of
course they're going to run Fri-
day" and George Shiebler, asso-
cite commissioner of the Eastern
Collegiate Athletic Conference,
said, "I think it's ridiculous for
any organization to tell NYU it
can't run some of its athletes in
its own association meet."
Since the AAU has no direct
control over a collegiate meet,
there is no way, except by warn-
ing, that it can keep the three
runners out of the meet.
But the complicating factor is
the fate of American athletes who
are in the meet and conceivably
could be nenalized for competing
against ineligible athletes.
Hull said his. group wouldn't
take any action against the Amer-
ican athletes, but said other for-
eign countries could protest if any
of the Americans turned up in any
international competition.
These countries could say that
by having competed against in-
eligible athletes in the United
States, they were suspended from
further competition themselves.
The case would then go to the
International Aamateur Athletic
Federation for a final decision.
Even though much of the dis-
pute appeared to be speculation
ov&r what might happen, it seemed
to worry. several coaches. of metro-
politan track teams who said they
didn't know whether or not to
compete in the intercollegiate
championships.

NCAA, Ivies Agree on 1.6

J
If

By The Associated Press NCAA rule's second paragraph
KANSAS CITY - An interim which concerns students com-
agreement paving the way for Ivy peting in varsity athletics. This
League competition in NCAA paragraph doesn't become appli-
championship events through this cable for the provisional group un-
spring was announced Sunday by til this year's freshman class be-
NCAAA President Marcus L. Plant,
a Michigan law professor, with the This W Teei
concurrence of Yale President
Kingman Brewster Jr.
All phases of the NCAA's 1.6 FRI
legislation were discussed by Plant Hockey--North Dakota at the Qo)
and Brewster in personal conver- SATU
sations following an exchange of Hockey-North Dakota at the Co
letters. Basketball-Michigan at Minnes
Plan emphasized that the Ivy Wrestling-Michigan State at Yo
League long has had admission Gymnastics-Iowa and Ohio Stat
policies that do not admit any Track-Indiana at Yost, 1:00 p.m
students, athletes or not, who MON
would fall below the 1.6 prediction
used by the NCAA in its national Basketball-Indiana at Yost, 8:0
table.
Shouldn't Apply AT NYAC GAMES:
The Ivy League believes the
NCAA legislation shouldn't apply K raker Sm a
to them, Plant said, because both
by conference agreement and by
practice at their schools, an ath-
lete may receive financial aid onlyont eb ss fth sa e c d mi
on the basis of the same academic Inor ee
standards and demonstration of
economic need as are applied to all Francis Kraker, Michigan soph-
other students. omore coed, set a woman's world
The NCAA Council has ruled record in the 600-yard dash last
that the legislation does apply, weekend in the New York Athletic
but is willing to review the ques- Club Track Meet, with a time of
tion in light of any additional in- 1:22.04.
formation. The previous mark, held by
The NCAA said the status of the Cecile Carter, was 1:23.02.
Ivy League in the 1967-68 aca- Miss Kraker earlier established
demic year will depend upon fur- a world record in the 880-yard
ther discussions of students al- run, which has since been eclipsed.
ready enrolled, as well as on ad-I Kraker followed up her excel-
mission standards. lent performance on Friday night,
For Now the last track meet run at Madi-
Brewster said provisional status son Square Gardens, with a :57.5
has been applied to Ivy schools winning effort at the Mason-Dix-
who at present stand mute on theI on Games Saturday. She was

comes eligible next September for
varsity competition.
Ivy League schools especially af-
fected by the agreement are
Princeton in basketball, Cornell in
hoc'key, and Yale in swimming.
in Sports

l,

DAY
liseum, 8:00 p.m.
RDAY
liseum, 8:00 p.m.
ota
st, 4:00 p.m.
e at the Sports building, 2:30 p.m.
n.
DAY
0 p.m.

-A
A

sshes World
rd in 600
shoulder-to-shoulder with Una
Morris, a Jamaican Olympian in
1964, but a final burst gave Fran-
cie the victory.
Morris was later disqualified for
running out of her lane and sec-
ond place was given to Dianne
Knight of Houston, clocked in :58
flat over the quarter-mile distance.
Next on Francie's schedule will
be the Maple Leaf Games in To-
ronto on Friday night.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR
GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER

Man-on-the-spot:..with the world's largest bank.

Professional
NBA Standings

Standings
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at New York
Los Angeles vs. San Francisco at San
D~iego, Calif.
Detrot at St. Louis
NHL Standings

- Eastern Division
W L1
Philadelphia 56 10
Boston 46 17
New York 33 34
x-Cincinnati 28 36
Baltimore 17 50
Western Division
San Francisco 39 26
x-St. Louis 31 34
Los Angeles 27 36
Detroit 25 40
Chicago 24 43
x-Incomplete.

Pct. GB
.848 -
.730 8Yz
.493 232
.438 27
.254 391/4
.600 -
.477 8
.429 11
.385 14
.358 16

Chicago
New York
Montreal
Toronto
Detroit
Boston

w
31
25
22
20
22
15

L
13
19
22
21
28
32

T Pts. GF GA
8 70 190 124
8 58 145 133
7 51 130 136
9 49 131 151
3 47 164 171
7 37 13'7 182

See Kaiser Aluminum's eyeball-
twirling poster on the bulletin
board in the Placement Office.
JW a~fA1

If you are about to receive your MBA degree,
you-should consider the opportunities that await
you in a key financial position with the world's
largest bank.
Bank of America is looking for men with
demonstrated academic ability and high leader-
ship potential to train at the management level in
our San Francisco or Los Angeles Headquarters.
Training is accomplished primarily through
project assignments. While in training, you'll be
exposed to such specialized financial areas as
Loan Administration, International Banking,
and other credit activities.
Following this initial period, you'll be given
A Bank of America Recruitment officer

specific assignments for rnanagement responsibil-
ity as a bank officer, and you'll be involved with
direct customer relations in loan negotiations
and business development with corporations
both in California and nationwide.
Bank of America's continued growth both at
home and abroad creates opportunities for indi-
vidual growth and development. To find out
more about these opportunities, write to College
Relations Officer, Bank of America, One South
Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102.
BANK OF AMERICA
NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION - MEEMBER F DERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
will be at your Placement office soon.

SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 131, Detroit 104
Philadelphia 123, St. Louis 122
Chicago 133, Los Angeles 119
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati vs. St. Louis at Kansas
ity (Inc)

SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 3, Montreal 1
New York 3, Chicago2
YESTERDAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled

i
I

___ _-._
_.._ _ 4
I ' ,

LACROSSE
MASS, MEETING

TODAY!
First & Only
SALE
of hardbound books
ait
CENTICORE
25% Off
many fine titles
from our regular
stock.
10 A.M.-10 P.M.
Tues. & Weds.

Four years ago I led the biggest
water balloon fight on campus.
Today I'm a Depart hent
Manager at John Hancock.
I was the good-time Charley at College. Oh, I worked
hard. But when it came to fun, I played hard too.
I'm at John Hancock now. I've been here since
graduation. And doing pretty well for myself. John Hancock
is one of the world's largest life insurance companies.
Our sales last year totaled over 42 billions. So if you're

Wed., Feb. 22

8:00 P.M.

Rm 130 B.A.

A - - - _____ __ - -_-__--r,.--- -

1229 South University
a SESQUIGRAS
SOld-u me
┬žahion
On Djag
12 noon
Tues., Feb. 21

eager to get ahead, there's plenty
of room. And a number
of ways to do it: sales,
programming, accounting,
auditing, management,
research, underwriting,
claim approving, and
electric data processing.
If you haven't
thought about a career
in life insurance, maybe
it's time you did. And with
us at John Hancock.

',

We made the car
go faster.

And the engine
go slower.

)I

We've added a full 3
m.p.h. to the top speed of the
Volkswagen.
If that doesn't sound like
o lot to you, it's because it
isn't. And wasn't meant to be.
We put most of the power in-
crease (from 50 horsepower
to 53) into the lower gears.
So you could climb hills easier.
And accelerate qiuicker.

at the expense of the engine.
In fact, we made the engine
turn even slower. So it would
last even longer.
You'll be very happy to
know this speedy new Volks-
wagen has dual brakes as
stondord equipment. If the
front brakes should ever fail,
the rear brakes will stop you.
And vice versa.

changes you can see, like
retracting seat belts, recessed
inside door handles, and
back-up lights. They're stand-
ard, too.
And so are the letters
V-Ot--K-S-W-A-G-E-N on the en-
gine lid.
So you'll recognize the
new bug when it passes you.
With its new, slower

When our John Hancock recruiter visits your campus,
-m akenivcP mnli q hm

1

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