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February 21, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-21

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1967

PAG IK SIX .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAOE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1967

GTO
Overhead Cam

2+2
Sprint

'Marat-de Sade': Lunacy Is Reality;TrioItalianod'Archi:

G

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By ANN L. MARCHIO
Peter Weiss' forceful and slight-
ly disturbing production of "The
Persecution and Assassination of
Jean-Paul Marat As Performed
by the Inmates of the Asylum of
Chartenton Under the Direction
of the Marquis de Sade," more
commonly referred to as "Marat
de Sade," was presented last night
at Hill Auditorium.
Sponsored by the University's
Professional Theatre Program, the
production is by the National
Players Company, organized by
Zev Bufman in October 1966 and

composed of fifty American ac-
tors, designers, director and tech-
nicians. The company was created
to produce contemporary drama
as well as new version of stage
classics.
Carefully paced by the director
Donald Driver the play has a
number of effective motifs, among
these are the whimsical motivation
of the mob and allegory on the life
of Christ. There is also a comic
relief character in the form of the
only sane man of the production,
the director of the asylum, played
by Edward Holmes. He serves to
connect the audience with the ac-

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tion in a most obvious way, yet,
the impact is even reinforced by
the audience's laughter.
The music, under the direction
or Rod Derefinko, is another in-
teresting highlight of the play.
Although there is a strong sense
of rhythm, the songs sound like
elaborate recitatives, almost at
home with Handel or Bach com-
positions.
A group of four figures, distin-
guished by their make-up and
choreography have a multiple pur-
pose. At times they provide an
animated and ethereal contrast to
these serious speeches of the Mar-
quis and Marat but also have two
additional roles. They act as a
Greek chorus when necessary,
commenting and filling in the
audience. And they become Furies,
haunting and molesting the mind
of Marat.
In this rather incongruous and
dynamic aura are juxtaposed the
protagonist and antagonist.
Marat, sitting in a literal bath
of mortification, watches his high
ideals concerning the rights of
man in the French revolution be-
come ineffectual because of the
greediness inherent inhthe revolu-
tionaries. Despite their victories
they still yell, "Marat, we're poor
Daily Classifieds
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and the poor stay poor." However, Perfec tio 1
he never gives up preparing his

The Special Events Committee of
Sesquigras would like to thank these
Ann Arbor Merchants for their help
in making Sesquigras the Best Weekend
in 150 yeafs.
The University Laundromat Folletts

and Depth

The Student Book Service
Norm's Little Shop,
Camelot Brothers
Schlanderer's Jewelers
Barnard's
Tice's Men's Shop
Ulrich's Book Store
Village Apothecary
Brown Jug
Redwood and Ross
Englander's
Carmans

Van Boven's
Wikels
Moe's Sport Shop
Campus Bootery
Wild's Men Store
Discount Records
(S. University & S. State)
Saffell and Bush
Drake's
Stanger's Design
Econo-car of Ann Arbor
Michigan Pharmacy

4'
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INTERVIEWS

writing to incite action, even when By RICHARD PERRY sion that the Trio Italiano ex-
his followers desert him. Ann Arbor audiences seldom hibits. Seldom has the writer heard
qualities that bind him pbiiOs5- burst into a spontaneous standing such perfection of timing and such
phically with Marat, but he rtas ovation, but the small group which clean articulation of both the
rejected the idea of revolution. Ile gathered in Rackham last Sunday swiftest arpeggios and the longer
feels that it leads to the death of thus rewarded the Trio Italiano architectural phrases.
choice, as well as severs one's in- d'Archi.11Pashwvrmuteenb-
dividuasstynThere exists a fine point where yond their perfect technique, for
Imagination and the body are a chamber grouphpasses from play- the Trio Italiano plays nottmerely
Imagnaton nd he odyareing well together to a state of the external structure of the mu-.
his only existence. Although he breathing together. The Buda- sic, but reaches to its reflective
began as a revolutionist, he was pest and Pascal Quartets, to name core. One finds oneself not mere-
incapable of murder because the but two, achieved this ultimate ly listening to "performance" but
revolution was a machine destroy- synthesis, and the Trio Italiano being involved in the "meaning"
ing without emotion. For him, no must be added to this select list. of the musical ideas, and ulti-
restless idea can break down the Many trios are composed of in- mately confronting, be it roman-
wall of society, no pen break down dividual solo artists who come to- tic, one's self.
its institutions. Igether for special performances The major work on the program
In this. stunning and unique and provide most expressive rend- was Mozeart's Divertimento in
composition of insanity and real- erings; few attain the technical E-flat major, K. 563, which this
ity, the meaning of each is obscure. perfection and united musical vi- group has previously recorded
(DGG 39150). All the above en-
Fou daton Tonacomiums apply to the Trio's per-
formance of this work. One could
perhaps have wished for a slightly
German House at Oxford in the Menuetto's so to provide a
greater contrast between the move-
vents, but this is a minor point.
By JOYCE WINSLOW The two-floor addition will The members of the Trio Italiano
A $100,000 grant has been pre- make room for a library. It will obviously own fine instruments,
sented by the Max Kade Founda- have individual study carros, a for they produced an enormously
tion for the establishment of a language lab, and equipment for rich and resonant tone.
German Language House in Ox- mdividual listening to tapes and Bocccherini's Trio in D opened
ford Housing. On the first floor will be a large tHayconcert. A contemporary of
Plans for the house call fora all-purpose roam for academic Haydn, Boccherini displays all of
two-floor addition to the and socialr eBh e the suprprise, wit, and tunefulness
Cheever Co-op. rya apurpose rooma willebe and lacks only the harmonic rich-
ai-conditioned. ness that we expect from the for-
Applications for admission to mer master. The Trio Italiano's
the co-operative House are avail- performance was sharp and lucid,
"able in room 1076, FriezeBuild revealing the interplay of the
ICE Ing and, must be turned in by Feb- three voices.
ERSH I P MEETING ruary 28. Room and board will cost Written in 1959, Goffredo Pe-
$715 for two semesters, the same trassi's Trio suspends us in a time-
1. SESQUISTRUGGLE price as all other Oxford units, less world devoid of Cartesian
including The French House al- (tonal) coordinates. There is some-
2. CIA-NSA-U of M ready established in Oxford oHus- t h i n g strangely sub-molecular
3. Eing. about this beautiful music, as if
ETC. 'The Max Kade Foundation of it were the soundtrack for a bub-
New York is chaired by Kade, 84, ble chamber. The execution of this
00 Rm. 3G, Union a retired businessman who manu- work, stressing a machine-like am-
factured Pertussin cough medi- bient in its perfection of,phrasing,
cine. was evocative and moving.

Vo
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