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February 21, 1967 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TTTF.RnAV- FFR'R.TTAR.V 91 °-Inair

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY q'yr1'gn&'v' E'VDITTA'D~7 ,~1 1f~flW

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IF YOU'D LIKE TO TALK ABOUT A
POSITION with a company that puts
a premium on ideas... a company
that can offer you a chance to do a
job on your own and in your own
way... a company that thinks ahead
and thinks young (we're probably
younger than you are).. .then WE'D
LIKE TO TALK WITH YOU
Let's make an appointment: See
your placement officer to arrange an
Interview on February 23.
KAISER
ALUMINUM & CHEMICAL
CORPORATION

Board Takes
No Action on
Sports Staff
Selections
The Board in Control of Student
Publications failed to act on the
recommendations for new senior
editors last night.
The recommendations of the
1966-67 senior sports staff were:
Clark Norton, sports editor; Bob
McFarland, executive sports edit-
or; and Grayle. Howlett and Rick
Stern, associate sports editors.
Chuck Vetzner, '67, current
sports editor, supported the resolu-
tion of all the Daily senior editors
refusing to accede to the Board's
stupulation that Roger Rapoport
was unacceptable for editor. The
four juniors also supported the
resolution. Clark Norton
Norton, a political science major
from Bowie, Maryland,has worked BIG PRACTICE WEEK:
on the Daily for three 'semesters, BI P A T C E K
specializing in wrestling and bas-
ketball coverage. He was a mem-
ber of the freshman tennis team. Icers Pre
sivly about track in his six seI P

GRAYLE HOWLETT

RICK STERN

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, February 21, 12:00 Noon
SUBJECT:,
"POLITICS IN GUYANA"
Speaker: Mr. John Bacchus (Guyana, S. America)
Graduate Student in Political Science

Bob McFarland

For reservations,
call 662-5529

Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center

f

care for Big Nodak Series

I

G Georg 19e
Bernard
Shaw
Youth isn't wasted on the young. And the young don't
waste their time at Celanese.
Our top people are never old-fashioned about any new
idea, whether it comes from middle management or
from our youngest college grad. We have a master plan
and the vitality to make it work. Marketing is way-out
and zeroed right in. Finance knows that we have better
things to do with our money than let it grow barnacles...
shelled out $465 million in capital expenditures
over the last 3 years. In the scientific department, we
combine technical insight with an unusual grasp of
marketing dynamics.
Thinking young explains how we chalked-up one of the
most impressive corporate rebuilding jobs in recent
history. How we turned what was basically a one-product.
business into'a solid and diverse international corporation
dealing in chemicals, miracle fibers, plastics, paints,
petroleum and forest products. How we multiplied sales
5 fold in 10 years. How we now have 100 plants in the
U.S., Canada, Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia.
Possibly we could afford to relax a little. But success
makes young blood run even faster.
Which means that the ambitious college grad couldn't
find a more provocative opportunity anywhere else in
American industry.
Accountants, Chemists, ChEs, MEs, Physicists, MBAs
Our representative will be on your campus soon.
Contact your placement director to make an interview
appointment. Or write for'a brochure outlining more
specific areas of job opportunity to Mr. J. B. Kuhn,,
Manager of University Recruitment, Celanese.
Corporation, 522 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10036.

mesters on the Daily. He is also
a political science major, from
Berkeley, Missouri, and is a mem-
ber of Sphinx,, junior honorary.
Howlett, a business administra-
tion major, has concentrated on
hockey in his three semesters of
sports writing. Howlett's father is
vice-president of the Cleveland In-
dians.
Stern has served on the Daily,
staff for three years, and is dou-
bling this year as head varsity
manager of the basketball team.
He is a psychology major from
Chicago, and has appropriately
specialized in covering basketball.

By DAVID TICKTON j
Two hours of hard skating,
shooting drills, and some work on
strategy and defense make up a
typical Michigan hockey practice.
Most of the skaters hurry off
the ice to take a quick shower,
shoot the breeze and go home. A
few, however, remain in the rink
with the freshmen to get a little
extra, skating and to perfect that
slap shot a little more.
Jerry Hartman, Saturday night's
big scorer in Michigan's impressive
8-2 victory over Minnesota-Du-
luth, is an advocate of extra-duty
practice. Hartman, who doubles

GRADUATES
in
ACCOUNTING FINANCE LAW
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ECONOMICS
WHY NOT
Take a step in the right direction toward swift personal and profes-
sional growth by joining the
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE
0 Excellent training programs
" Self development courses .
* Standard 40 hour work week
* Periodic salary reviews
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
rMARCH 13. 1967
See your Placement Office and arrange to meet our Recruiters to learn
more about our challenging career opportunities.
OR
Write: College Recruitment Coordinator
P.O. Box 84
Detroit, Michigan 48231
When in Detroit visit us in:I
Room 502 Federal Bldg.-Downtown Detroit
Corner Washington Blvd. & Fort Street
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

as defensive halfback for the
Michigan gridders, had only play-
ed in three games before team:
injuries gave him a shot. He has
responded with three goals and
two. assists in the last four games.
Toughies
The entire team will need every
bit of practice they can get for
the upcoming series against North
Dakota next weekend. "They're a
tough team to play," said Coach Al
Renfrew. "We've got to win them
both." For Michigan to catch
Dakota they have, to win both
games, lifting them to a tie for
the WCHA championship.
"That Minnesota series kept us
alive," commented Renfrew on
Michigan's sweep of Duluth. Mich-
igan pulled out a real cliffhanger
Friday night, when Bob Boysen
scored the winning oal in a 6-5
sudden-death overtime victory.
Saturday night's game provided
a different type of excitement as
the Wolverine skaters overpower-
ed Duluth, scoring seven goals in
the first 28 minutes of play. "For
the first period and a half we
really played well," Renfrew'
stated. "We'll need that same top
effort against North Dakota.
We'll have to be at our peak to
win both."
? Importance
"These are probably the most
important games of the year so
far," Friday night's goalie Jim
Keough offered.
Dakota teams are usually really
good skaters," added defenseman
Lars Hansen. "And they're usually
pretty big."
Michigan should have good mo-
mentum after this last sweep. "The
team played better Saturday than
we have in the last three weeks,"

junior defensemen Bill Lord stated. coming series. Bob Baird, out with
Lord scored a goal in each of the a knee injuriy for the Duluth ser-
Wolverine victories. These were his ies, is skating this week. "Baird
first two goals of the season. will be used sparingly," Renfrew
Michigan will be close to full commented. "Mike Martilla has a
strength for the important up- cold he'll be able to play."

'I

I

a. -cX 'EL at .o x.
UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA
Livermore, California
OPERATED BY THE UNIVERSITY Of
CALIFORNIA FOR THE UNITED STATES
ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

CONVERGING ON THE Minnesota Duluth net, the Wolverine
icers exhibit the style of play that brought them two victories
over the weekend. Identifiable Michigan players include Dean
Lucier (6), Bob Baird (14), and Danny Walter (13).
W. Kentucky Grabs Third,
UCLA Holds Top in Poll
By The Associated Press North Carolina slipped one place
Streaking Western Kentucky to fifth. The Tar Heels lost to
climbed into third place behind Clemson after defeating North
UCLA and Louisville in the As- Carolina State and South Caro-
sociated Press' major college bas- lina.
ketball poll. Kansas, Syracuse and Princeton's setback by Cornell
Tennessee also made notable gains, dumped the Tigers into the No.
Western Kentucky, fifth last 6 spot, a loss of three places. Hous-
week, has won 20 in succession ton seld seventh although it boost-
after an opening game loss. The ed its record to 19-3 with victor-
Hilltoppers scored victories over ies over Creighton, St. Mary's of
Tennessee Tech and Morehead last Texas and Miami of Florida.
week. The top ten, with first place
Unbeaten UCLA was a unani- votes in parentheses, season rec-
mous choice for first place for the ords through Saturday, Feb. 18, and
sixth consecutive 'week. The Bru- basloints on a 10-9-7-6-5--3-2-1
ins lifted their record to 21-0 by 1. UCLA (34) 21-0 340
defeating Oregon 34-25 and Ore- 2. Louisville 22-2 298
gnState 72-50. 3. Western Kentucky 20-1 223
gn4. Kansan 17-3 187
The Bruins, with 340 points, are s. North Carolina 18-3 173
followed by Louisville, who at 22-2, 6. Princeton 20-2 155
downed North Texas and Tulsa in 7. Houston 19-3 44
last week's games. 8. Syracuse 19-2 72
9. Tennessee 17-4 49
Louisville polled 29 votes for 10. Texas western 17-5 47
second place, four for third and Others.receiving votes, listed al-
one for sixth. phabetically: Boston College, Brig-
ham Young, Clemson, Connecticut,
Western Kentucky collected 223 Cornell, Dayton, Florida, Indiana,
points while Kansas rushed up New Mexico, New Mexico State, Prov-
two places to fourth with 187. The idence, St. John's NY, Toledo, Tulsa,
JayhwksbeatOklhomaandOk- University of the Pacific, Utah
Jayhawks beat Oklahoma and Ok State, Vanderbilt, Virginia Tech~ and
lahoma State for a 17-3 mark. Washington State.
They said it couldn't
be done. But, why not
drop by for the
i nthe
aB 4:00

q

4

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4

4

MAJOR PROGRAMS NOW UNDER WAY:
PLOWSHARE-Industrial and scientific uses of
nuclear explosives. WHITNEY-Nuclear weapons for
national defense. SHERWOOD-Power production
from controlled thermonuclear reactions. BIOMEDI-
CAL-The effects of radioactivity on man and his en-
vironment. SPACE REACTOR-Nuclear power
reactors for space explorations...far-reaching pro-

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