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February 07, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

cwo

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1967

STRESS SOCIAL SCIENCES:
Revise Journalism Program

Publications Board Asks
'U' To Investigate Daily

A large scale revision of the lum to be four hours.
curriculum of the department of The graduate program will be
journalism has begun with the intensive to accommodate vayring
restructuring of course offerings academic and professional back-
for the Fall term. grounds of candidates for the M.A.
The new- undergraduate major°The degree normally will require
will be based on courses which two years and, as in the past, a
stress the social science. Current strong specialization in another
undergraduate requirements have area along with journalism courses
been restructured. to provide a will be expected.
more liberal number of courses in Systematic planning of these
other departments. new programs began in 1963 under
The graduate program leading the leadership of Wesley H. Mau-
to a raster's degree will be en- rer, then head of the department.
larged and will stress a special- This-evolution in structure does
ization in another area along with not really constitute a major
journalism, change, according to Prof. William
Undergraduate students now con- Porter, chairman of the depart-
centrating in journalism will be ment.
permitted to complete their stu- Porter said the move was made
dies under present requirements. because the department has be-
Future undergraduate students come convinced that the graduate
will study under a program focus-scolithprerlaefrr-
ing on the history and influence school is the proper place for pro-
of the newspaper, broadcasting, fessional courses, with the grow
and magazine industries. Focus ing demand of the profession it-
will also be on the comparative self for talent with advanced de-
study of communications systems grees.
in- other countries and upon the "At the same time, the re-struc-
individual as a participant in a turing of the undergraduate pro-
grm saturated by mass media. gram will provide," Porter added,
A two-semester sequence in "an increasing contribution to the
writing also will be required at the offerings of the literary college of
sophomore level. Present plans call which the department is proud to
for all courses in the new curricu- be a part."
Collegiate BandConvention
To Honor Director Reveli
Dr. William D. Revelli, renowned The Band was also the first
director of bands at the University, major university- band to perform
will be honored at the Silver Ann- extensively throughout the United
versary meeting of the College States every year.
Band Directors' National Associa- Highlighting the four-day con-
tion February 8-11,'in Ann Arbor. vention will be nine bands from
In 1941, Revelli gathered to- across the nation. The concerts
gether 34 of his colleagues at a 1 will be given at 8:30 p.m. at Hill
Chicago hotel, and formed the as- Auditorium, with free public ad-
sociation, which has now grown to mission.
a national membership of over 700 The schedule of concerts is:
band directors. Wednesday, Feb. 8-University
Dr. Revelli has been the conduc- Symphony Band, William D. Re-
tor of the Michigan Bands since velli, conductor; Ithaca College
1935. Since that time a number , elli on u to
J.ai, Y~~A, ..U&~j .L~BIJ.

The new courses which will be (Continued from Page 1) "Freedom and responsibility are
taught this fall for the first time ing of the system under which we the strongest points of The Daily,"
are a beginning survey course, operate." he said.
Journalism 201, "The Social Role Questions of the amount of "lat- He viewed SACUA's investiga-
of the Mass Media"; and a sopho- o be given to the paper tion as centering primarily around
more-level course, Journalism 301, and the "extent to which the procedural matters involving the
"Writing for Mass Audiences" board can supervise The Daily" Board's relationship to The Daily.
were cited as important factors He referred to the methods by
to the decision to re- which the senior staff is chosen
TeloReluincontributing t h eiint e
Text of Resoluquest the SACUA investigation, as an example of the type of ques-
The issue of The Daily's "re- tion which SACUA would in-
The reexamination this year of sponsibility" to the University was vestigate.
questions pertaining to the student also termed a matter for explora- One Board member criticized
role on campus has not as yet in- tion by SACUA. the proposed investigation by
cluded direct attention to a vital Among the stories considered to SACUA because the perspective of
area of student activity, namely have contributed to the crisis was the individuals conducting the re-,
the student newspaper. While the the recent disclosure of Universi- view "might not be sufficiently
Board in Control of Student Pub- ty of California at Berkeley Chan- broad."
lications has continuing responsi- cellor Roger Heyns' possible inter- Another Board member, assess-
bility in this area, it seems appro- est in the presidency of the Uni- ing the probable outcome of the
priate that its policies and prac- versity if offered to him and the study, predicted that SACUA would
tices from time to time be sub- criticism of aspects of the Uni- either "substantiate our judgment
jected to objective review by an versity's $55-million fund drive that the Board has operated cor-
outside group, uncommitted to the printed on the editorial page last rectly" or would present an "in-

CINEMA II
presentsr
Anthony Quinn
Alan Bates
Irene PappasI
in
Z'-OJBA
THE
GREEK
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
6:45 and 9:30 P.M.

Saturday, Feb. 11
Inter House Assembly will
provide skating, tobagganing,
snowman - building, skidoos,
fun & frolic. Bus service from
the Union will provide free,
warm transportation to WEST
PARK between 12:30-4:30. A
"Mixer at Markley" at 8:30
will provide a climax to the
day of events with music by
Sol Estes. Bring your skates &
sleds & join us in saluating
winter with the first Annual
IHA DAY

4

existing system and capable of
bringing to the situation fresh
points of view. The Board believes
that the University would benefit
from such a review at the present
time, and I have been directed to
request that SACUA take the ac-
tion necessary to bring it about.
More specifically, the Board
would propose the appointment of
a committee charged with the fol-
lowing tasks:
(1) to inform itself concerning
the constitution under which the
newspaper operates, and the prac-
tices which govern that opera-
tion;
(2) to consider the proper pur-
pose, function, and responsibility
of a student newspaper in this
university commuity;
(3) to consider whether the ex-
isting arrangements at the Uni-
versity of Michigan adequately
serve these goals, and to' recom-
mend changes if better alterna-
tives can be identified.
You may be assured of the
Board's full cooperation with such
a study committee. The Board will
also underwrite whatever expendi-
tures may be made necessary by
the investigation.
Sincerely yours,
Luke K. Cooperrider,
Chairman

week.
SACUA Chairman Brown com-
mented that his group would be
likely to develop a "broad and well-
informed committee representing
many viewpoints."
Brown described the Board's re-
quest for an investigation as "un-
derstandable" in view of "con-
siderable discussion" among ad-
ministration and faculty mem-
bers of certain stories.
He advocated the inclusion of
students and administration rep-
resentatives in the committee, an
action which apparently would be
opposed by at least some Board
members.
Brown predicted that the fac-
ulty would not react emotionally
to the situation. He commented
The Daily as a "fine student
paper" but reiterated that there
'have been questions about whether
some articles have been harmful
to the University and to some in-
dividuals."
He emphasized that SACUA
would not be serving as a censor,
in its review of The Daily's opera-
tion.

novative idea that doesn't do vio-
lence to editorial freedom."
"If you people (the Daily edi-
tors) feel your operation can't
stand examination, you're in worse
shape than we realized," a Board
member commented.
One of the Board's three stu-
dent members, Stephen Berkowitz,
Grad, said "I feel that the action
of the Board as taken at this time
is a political act not consonant
with the role of the Board as a
fair arbiter of journalist practice
and the role of a free student
press. Although it was not the
sense of the Board that the fac-
ulty ought to be given 'carte
blanche' in this case, this charge
from the Board might be con-
strued as such. This is dangerous
because there is no guarantee that
the student interest will be pro-
tected."
Most other Board members re-
fused to comment on the decision.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

AUD. A
ANGELL HALL

50c

I.D. Required

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Dial 8-6416

Positively
Ends Wednesday

of honors have been bestowed
upon him, among.,which is the
"Faculty Award for Distinguished
Achievement" presented to him by
the University. He has appeared
as guest conductor with most of
the nation's top collegiate bands
and writes extensively on bands
and band music.
The University Symphony Band
was selected by the State Depart-
ment in 1959 as the first band to
represent the United States in the
Soviet Union and the Near East
as a part of our cultural exchange
program. The group received ex-
tensive praise for its performances
from critics, composers, musicians,
and audiences.

r~aa, aitr eeier, concut.
Thursday, Feb. 9 - Michigan
State University Concert Band,
Leonard Falcone, conductor; Uni-
versity of Minnesota Concert Band,
Frank Bencriscutto, conductor.
Friday, Feb. 10-University of
Montana Concert Band, David
Whitwell, conductor; Ohio State
University Symphonic Band, Don-
ald McGinnis, conductor.
Saturday, Feb. 11-Luther Col-
lege Band, Weston Noble, conduc-
tor (10:00 A.M.); Western Division
Junior College Honor Band of
Pasadena, California, conducted
by various guest conductors; Ar-
kansas Polytechnic College Band,
Gene Witherspoon, conductor.

JTIFUL FILM"-The New Yorker

"Cybernetic Challenge in the University
" DR. TIMOTHY LEARY, founder for League For
Spiritual Discovery
Monday, Feb. 13, H ilI Aud., 8 P.M.
* DR. JOHN WEISS, Asst; Prof. of European History
of Wayne State University
"Wanted: A Society for the Preservation
of Cruelty to Undergraduates'
Sunday, Feb. 19, Aud. A, 2:30 P.M.
* DR. ROGER WESCOTT, Chairman of the
Anthropology Dept. of Drew University
"A Coenetic Approach to Communications
Problems"
Sunday, Feb. 26, Aud. A, 2:30 P.M.

4

ENDING THURSDAY
_ Shows at 1:15-3:05-5, 7, &9
"A SPLASHY, SURESOAKED SLEEPER!
BREATHTAKING! IMAGINATIVE!
The nicest surprise to happen in a long time.
Unless you just enjoy turning your back
entirely on life, you should not miss the
breathtaking shots!"

"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINAL!"N.Y. TIMES
COLUMNA NCIU &S
j3MOS M3SON O8W1S LYN WRave
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Tuesday 7 and 9
th
s Michigan
z10 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

I

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GRAND PRIZE WINNER
1966 CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL
SCiAUE COOK
r - - - ?PRESENTS
.. 'A MAN,
N4 ANd A WOMAN
HELD OVER 2nd WEEK!

CO-SPONSOREbI BY HONORS STEERING COMMITTEE
AND THE PROGRAM IN AMERiCAN CULTURE

4

r.

Dial
5-6290
"ALFIE" Starts Friday

COLOR by DeLux.
SUGGESTED fOR TDY
MATUR TODAYCES
1:00 3:00 5:05
7:15 9:25
I -in

LVNFRANK Production1/
~NED ONTIE
)THE FORUM"
smus5athm UNITED ARTISTS -
T4e1t6

Tickets Now!
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS

ARTHUR MILLER FESTIVAL

;I

Program information 6 NO 2-6264

,,.
- - ---

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Ah DistinguishedCompany
Breathes Life Into
Shakespeare's Lusty Age wf

STARTING THURSDAY
AMERICAN
PREMIERE !

YOUNG DEMOCRATS PRESENTS:
"THE STUDENTS' STAKE
IN THE
ANN ARBOR CITY ELECTIONS"
Hear: DR. EDWARD PIERCE, Dem. Candidate for Mayor
JEROME DU PONT, Law Student, Councilman Candidate
in 2nd Ward
Four Other Councilman Candidates

a1!

'

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INCIDENT
AT VICHY
8 P.M.-February 8-11
AFTER THE FAIL
8 P.M.-March 15-18
THE CRUCIBLE
8 P.M.-April 5-8
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre
BOX OFFICE
OPEN NOW!

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Wednesday, Feb. 8-Union Ballroo

m-8:00 P.M.

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Tuesday ... 4:15 P.M.-Aud "A" Angell Hall
"The Religious Question in the Israeli Community"

Good Seats Still Available

1

ELIEZERI GOLDMAN
Professor at Bar-Han University
near Tel Aviv
'

THIS WEEK ONLY!

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incident at
' Vichy

BOX OFFICE

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