100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 04, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1967

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 4,1967

STATE DEPARTMENT PANEL:

Med Program Provides Personal Touch

4A

Advisors Disagree on Soviet Role

In

Communist

China's

By The Associated Press
Members of the State Depart-
ment's new advisory panel of
specialists on China are in sharp
disagreement over the Soviet role
in Communist China's present
turmoil.
Prof. Alexander Eckstein of the
University's economics department
says that the primary factors in
the, struggle between Chairman
Mao Tse-tung and the old guard
party organization are internal,
but that the Sino-Soviet dispute is

closely intertwined with the do-
mestic purge.
A. Doak Barnett, acting director
of the East Asian Institute, Co-
lumbia University, strongly main-
tains that the fundamental causes
of the present struggle among the
Chinese Red leaders are domestic.
He sees Communist China tending
to turn toward and become more
preoccupied with internal problems
and less adventurous in the future.
Robert A. Scalapino, chairman

c
c
I
t
t
i
3
1
1
1

FILMS

of the political science department
of the University of California at
Berkeley, disagrees and contends
that foreign policy reverses and
particularly the Sino-Soviet rup-
ture have not been important but
will become increasingly so as the
crisis mounts.
Barnett said it is impossible to
foresee restoration of the type of
Sino-Soviet relations that existed
in the 1950s. But if a new type
of leadership comes to Communist
China, he could see small steps
taken to reduce the present fric-
tion.
Eckstein recalled the pact be-
tween the Soviet Union and Nazi
Germany at the outset of World
War I and cautioned: "I don't
think we can totally rule out the
reconciliation between the Soviet
Union and Communist China."
All three consider 1958, the year
of Mao's "great leap forward," as
the beginning of the crisis for him.
Eckstein said the food crisis that
followed Mao's orders to estab-
lish communes profoundly shook
the confidence of his followers.
The worsening of relations with

)truggles
the Soviet Union, he said, stem-
med from the resulting internal
policy clashes.
"Mao is deeply concerned China
should not follow Moscow's way,"
Eckstein said, adding that Mao
profoundly believes he can sub-
stitute revolutionary enthusiasm
for technical competence.
Barnett said it is fairly clear
that Mao is using the military and
the paramiiltary forces to sur-
round the party organization.
"That doesn't mean there isn't
any division inside the army, but
it is clear that the party appa-
ratus is under attack."
Scalapino said a mission of the
Japan Communist party to Peking
in February 1966 sought a united
front in support of North Vietnam
and was able to obtain agreements'
with North Korea and North Viet-
namese leaders. But, he said, the
negotiations with top Chinese
leaders reached no agreement be-
cause , of the differences then
existing at the top Chinese level
on policy towards supporting
North Vietnam militarily.

Personal training is possible for
today's medical student despite
large classes and a staggering
amount of data to learn, a new
University program reveals.
But it does require cooperation
on many fronts, professional sup-
port, willing students and helpful,!
interested faculty.
The special student program in
anesthesiology may even be so
good that it has a future as an
elective portion of the medical
school curriculum, says Dr. Robert
B. Sweet, chairman of the Uni-
versity Medical School's depart-
ment of anesthesiology.
Called the student preceptorship
in anesthesiology, the program,
supported by the American Society
of Anesthesiologists, gives a med-
ical student personal clinical train-
ing. It is designed to give seniors
the kind of experience not possible
in classrooms. They work under
direct supervision and tutelage of
a preceptor, and a practicing
anesthesiologist.
John Wittekindt, a senior medi-
cal student from Downers Grove,
Ill., gave up vacation days to be
a preceptee at the University. He,
says the program gave him real
insight into the problems of anes-
thesiology. Interested in surgery,'
he believes the opportunity for

clinical experience lets the student
"see just how closely the anes-
thesiologists and surgeons work
together."
The student spends considerable
time in the operating room of the
hospital, where he learns to use
anesthetics and equipment under
tutelage of a doctor. Patient care
is a vital part of the learning ex-
perience which the busy medical
school schedule sometimes mini-
mizes. The preceptee participates
in consultations, learns about
problems of acute respiratory dis-
tressfl inhalation therapy, resusci-
tation, and management of car-
diac arrest.
Dr. Jay S. Finch, instructor in
anesthesiology and a former med-
ical stundent here, says the pre-
ceptorship "gives the student a
chance to do things, not just be
an observer."
"It is possible for a medical
student to go through med school
without any exposure to anesthe-
siology," Dr. Finch points out.
"This type of program helps fill
the gap for the student.'
Members of the American So-
ciety of Anesthesiologists have
contributed $100,000 to support
the project in 1967. The society
expects to expand the program to
include about 350 students, and

will pay each preceptee $75 per
week.
"The interest shown by the
practicing anesthesiologists in this
coutry in this type of preceptor-
ship training shows that they rec-
ognibe the great need for more
physicians in this field," says Dr.
Sweet.
It is hoped that with the pre-
ceptorship, more students will be-
come interested in anesthesiology,
as a specialty career, he em-
phasized.
"The preceptorship gives theI
medical student an opportunity to
find out the scope of anesthe-j
siology, and to discover that all
his opportunities are not confined
to the operating room, but to out-
side relationships as well-the re-
covery room, intensive care unit,
the laboratory and inhalation
therapy."
Dr. Sweet believes, the student

not only learns to administer
anesthesthetic agents under close
supervision and become fully ac-
quainted with the speciality, but
also to achieve a close relationship
with the faculty.
The preceptorship program could
influence current planning by
medical educators to revise cur-
riculum. A newer speciality, anes-
thesiology gets relatively little at-
tention in the traditional medical
school curriculum.
Dr. Sweet believes the program
deserves a trial of some years to
see whether the objectives are ac-
complished. The ASA plans to
make a comprehensive study of
the preceptees, as well as the co-
operating schools and hospitals.
A follow-up will be made of
each participating student, to de-
termine whether he maintains an
interest in anesthesiology and be-
comes a career specialist.

I1

Fran Gripping, Powerful

By DAVID MORRIS
"La Tete Contre Les Murs'"
shown Thursday and last night at;
Cinema Guild, is a movie of un-
usual power. Director Georges
Franju, of the French anarchist
school, maintains an uncomfort-
able but nonetheless successful
grip on his audience frombegin-
ning to end.
His subject is the conflict be-
tween man and society with re-
spect to individual freedom, and
he uses the insane asylum as his
battleground. Franju depicts two
points of view concerning this con-
flict in his protagonists. One of
these people is a young rebel for
whom freedom is the most im-
portant requirement of his exist-
ence. This freedom is conveyed in
an excellent opening scene while
he is wildly scrambling on a motor-
cycle, and later shown in his. re-
peated escapes from the asylum.
Heis Franju's hero , but in the
blackness of the director's vision
he is doomed.' The message seems
to be that while the struggle of
one man for absolute freedom is
noble and admirable, it has no
resolution in a .society. Thus the
rebel must necessarily be confined,
separated in an institution repre-
senting the values of society.
On the other hand, those values
may well be stifling and inhuman.
The head psychiatrist of the asyl-
um is a symbol of fear and life-
lessness which characterize many
of those who have made the so-
called adjustment to society. His,
complete inability to understand
Phone 482-2056
ExacaOoCARPE TR ROAD
FIRST OPEN 5:30 P.).!. FIRST
RUN NOW SHOWING RUN
FREE HEATERS
Shown at 7:05 & 11:50
COLORB By OLUXE
Also-Shown at 8:50 Only
COLORN., ew.
PLUS-THIRD BIG FEATURE
"CURSE OF THE
LIVING CORPSE"
Shown at 10:25 Only

the elemental desire for freedomt
is displayed in a moving scene in
which an inmate chooses suicide
as his only release from the
asylum. The psychiatrist consoles
himself in the fact that he did1
not invent the methods he uses.
Besides the philosophic questioni
of freedom, Franju presents thel
social problem of psychiatric care.1
He asks wether the purpose of an
asylum is to protect society or
cure the insane. In depicting the
opposing methods of two psychi-
atrists he comes out strongly in
favor of those stressing freedom
over confinement. Throughout the
movie there are effective scenes
of men broken by the sense of im-
prisonment which pervades the
psychiatric institution.
Franju also comments on the
attitude of the public toward the
insane. One short but forceful
statement occurs when two hunt-
ers spot the hero escaping and
while one shoots him like an ani-
mal, the other frantically screams
"madman, madman."
The mood of this film is ex-
ceedingly pessimistic and leaves
one more than a little-frightened
at its implication, but it,is com-
pelling in its presentation and
worthy of much consideration.

-4

Dial 8-6416

Holding Again!
4th Week!

NOW SHOWING

FILMV"-The New Yorker

GRAND PRIZE WINNER
1966 CANNES FILM
- FESTIVAL
r A MAN Wo )
- = ANdIAWOltMAN

i

SORRY, "FALSTAFF"
Your American Premiere
Will Simply Have To Wait

E

L

HELD
OVER

. MICHIGBM

DIAL
5-6290

"SUPERIOR! WONDERFUL PELL-MELL
ENJOYMENT, IMMENSELY ORIGINAL!
THE WAY IT IS WITH THIS NEW BREED
OF YOUNG PEOPLE RACING CRAZILY
THROUGH A CHANGING WRL D"
-Bosley Crowther. N.X 74mws
COLUMB1A PICTURES new.
JAMES MASON- ALAN BATES-LYNN REOGRAVE1
dmam*CHARLOTTE RAMPLING S mnpftyMARGARETFORSTET dPIER ICOS Dsdm afsMMGARftv W Ifm
#.w..e RBERT A.GOLOSTON .10TTOPLASCHKES UO. bSII.VlD NARIZZANO aEWRSin. '.
"""""" "("' ,m
Saturday: 5, 7, 9, and 11

"BRILLIANT, A PERFECT MOVIE, A GREAT MOVIE."
-The New Yorker
"A SPLASHY, SURF-SOAKED SLEEPER!"-Life Mag.
"BREATHTAKING! SWEEPING AND EXCITING."
--Newsweek
"A DAZZLING ODE TO SUN, SAND AND SURF!"
-Time Mag.
"HYPNOTIC BEAUTY AND CONTINUOUS
EXCITEMENT, BUOYANT FUN."-New York Times
"MAGNIFICENT! NOT TO BE MISSED."
-Harper's Bazaar
"SOMETHING VERY SPECIAL. ANYONE WHO CAN'T
SEE THE BEAUTY AND THRILL OF IT
HASN'T GOT EYES."-New York Post

Sunday:

5, 7, and 9

SHOWS AT 1:15 - 3:05 - 5:00 - 7:00 - 9:00

A BRUCE BROWN FILM IN BEAUTIFUL COLOR

_

TODAY at 1:00-3:00-5:05-7:15-9:25
Progrm nfr-N--64TATE
Program Information 0 NO 2-6264:1

CINEMA-
TONIGHT
&
TOMORROW
Akira Kurosawa's
THE
LOWER
DEPTHS
1957. Japanese,
subtitles.
Gorky's classic
tr, -znrc ton

Ih

0
and NATIONALITY CLUBS
UNION-LEAGUE
of the University of Michigan
00
Fri., Feb. 3 7:00 P.M.-12:30A.M.
Sat., Feb. 4 1:O0P.M.-12:30 A.M.
d0
* Michigan Union
* General Admission 50c
V
* Variety Show 75c
Q0
Friday 8 and 10
Saturday 7, 9,and1 1
I(Imnn R nllrenm C-

I

I

1111

.

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan