100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 15, 1966 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1966

TH IHGNDIYfIAARL1,16

tudy Abroad Programs To
ee Europe, Mediterranean

U' Lacking in Women Faculty Members

By ALICE BLOCH
Over 150 enthusiastic and inter-
national-minded students will be
finding an outlet this year for
their enthusiasm and internation-
al-mindedness by participating in
University-sponsored summer- and
junior year-abroad programs.
Faculty - supervised s t u d e n t
groups will be traveling to Israel;
Great Britain and the Soviet Un-
ion for summer session courses,
and to France and Germany for
studies during the academic year.
Prof. Louis L. Orlin' of the de-
Dartment of Near Eastern lan-
guages and literatures will direct
the nine-week field trip to Israel,
which will begin June 30. The
academic program will consist of
an intensive study of Biblical his-
tory, the heritage of Judaism and
the life and teachings of Jesus.
About 35 students are now en-
rolled for the trip, according to
Orlin. He added that the course
can still accommodate' 30 to 40
more students.
To England
A second group will be travel-
ing to London during the first
half of the summer trimester un-
der the joint sponsorship of the
college of education and the de-
partments of political science and
speech.*
Courses -will be offered in Con-

temporary Education in the Brit-
ish Commonwealth, Organization
and Operation of the Government
of Great Britain, and Contempor-
ary British Rhetorical Theory and
Communication.
About 40 students will partici-
pate in the summer study tour to
the Soviet Union. This tour will
consist of a month-long prepara-
tory course in Ann Arbor, follow-
ed by three weeks in Leningrad,
Moscow and Kiev.
To France
The Michigan-Wisconsin Junior
Year in France Program will be
taking 20 University students to
the University of Aix-Marseille
this fall. They will be enrolled for
the entire academic year in cours-
es at the level of the Propedeutique
(for French students in their first
year of college) and the Licence
(the regular degree program).
In addition to courses in French
language and literature, courses
will be available in social sciences
and humanities.
Twelve more students will be
spending their junior year at the
University of Freiburg on the
Michigan-Wayne-Wisconsin Year
in Germany Program. Under the
direction of Prof. Valentine Hubbs
of the German department, the
group will- take courses in Ger-
man, zoology, botany, political sci-
ence, economics and history.

(Continued from Page 1)
may not be able to find suitable
employment in acommunity as
small 'as Ann Arbor.
Moreover, if the husband is also
a professor, many departmental
administrators feel the pressure of
an unwritten nepotism rule for-
bidding the employment of a hus-
band and wife in tenure positions
in the same department. There is
no other first-rate University con-
veniently nearby.
According to Prof. Warner Rice,
chairman of the English depart-
ment, it has usually been a good
policy not to employ married
couples as professors in the same
or closely related departments be-
cause any decision made concern-
ing one immediately affects both
in a direct way.
Rice observes that in the past,
the literary college's executive
committee has occasionally dis-
couraged the hiring of couples. If
husband and wife were employed
before they married, they have
usually not been disturbed in their
posts, however.
Other Views
Prof. George Hay, chairman of
the mathematics department, on
the other hand, claims the nepo-
tism rule does not exist. Prof.
William McKeachie, chairman of
the psychology department, says
it exists but can be evaded by
placing relatives on different
projects with different budgets.
The third reason for the scarcity
of wpmen professors is evidently
the attitudes of chairmen and
executive committees, which re-
quire, many nonacademic "qualifi-
cations" of the woman applicant.
Rice, for example, claims he is
most interested in single women,
for "What would we do with their
husbands?" Furthermore, accord-
ing to Prof. Oleg Grabar of the
department of art history, "Al-
though most men won't admit it,
they look at how marriagable a
single girl PhD is. A potential
spinster. is a better investment
than an attractive lively girl."
Hay is reluctant to hire a wom-

an who has not shown that she
can cope with family responsibili-
ties and also teach, produce re-
search and "help run the Univer-
sity," thus reducing the number
of female applicants available to
him. He says that "it is unlikely
that a woman can do research
and raise children," and that "there
are very few women whose dedica-
tion to mathematics exceeds their
mother instinct."
To illustrate their beliefs about
the "mother instinct" two profes-
sors said their secretaries often
leave in the winter to take care
of sick children.
Yet many personnel experts at-
tacked this assumption. Mrs. Nina
Smith, assistant to Thad Carr,
personnel director for the Ann
Arbor Public Schools, there is a
very low absentee rate for female
high school teachers.
Yet precisely this sort of rea-
soning-"What women secretaries
or undergraduates will do, .so will
women with PhD's"-seems to
pervade the thoughts ofmen in
charge of hiring professors.
Subordinate Careers
Some fear the women will never
consider their own careers, but
subordinate those careers entirely
to their husbands'. Of course some
women do make such a sacrifice.
But the majority of women inter-
viewed are able to coordinate
their careers with their husbands'
and do not intend to sacrifice their
careers to them.
For example, two men expect to
get PhD's from the University in
mathematics this year. One's wife
has two to three years to go to
get a PhD in psychology; the
other has a wife with two to three
years more needed for a PhD in
mathematics. Both men plan to
stay around the University al-
though it will almost certainly
be damaging for their mathemati-
cal careers to do so.
Another issue which bothers
chairmen is whether a woman
PhD will become less productive
academically when she has young
children.

Yet inquiries show that almost
no women PhD's quit permanently
when they have a baby. Vera
Levitt, psychologist at the Chil-
dren's Psychiatric Hospital said
that none of her female colleagues
quit for more than a couple of
years and some not even for that.
Policy on Pregnancies
At Lockheed Aircraft Company
in Burbank, Calif., about 30 wom-
en computer programmers are em-
ployed. One of the supervisors of
this programming group explained
their policy about pregnancies:)
The women must leave three
months before their babies are due
and may not return until three
months after the babies are born.
They almost always return and
complain that the six months
staying at home were very dull and
that they couldn't wait to get
back to work.
Other administrators fear they
might not get their money's worth
in "running-the-University" func-
tions such as advising grad stu-.
dents, leading field trips, aug-
menting the library or serving
on committees. Many of them feel
that, even with a housekeeper, the
woman may have more respon-
sibilities in the home than the
man, especially if she has children.
We're lining up
12,000
office workers for
SUMMER JOBS
now!
Typists, stenographers, switch-
board operators, file clerks, key-
punch operators . . . we need
them all, in over 400 cities,
because Manpower is the world's
largast temporary help service.I
So, if you're going to be available
for summer work and want the
best job you can get, stop in at
the Manpower office in your
home city.'
MANPOWER
THE VERY BEST IN TEMPORARY HELP

These objections, however, were
uniformly given by professors who
had had no experience in hiring
female professors, even on a part-
time basis.
The professors and chairmen do
not think they are being preju-
diced or unfair. If they find a
woman who satisfies all their aca-
demic and nonacademic require-
ments, they will offer her a job.
(Even Rice offered a position to
a woman this year, but the offer
was not accepted.) They are not
against women, only certain types
of women: single, married or
young.
Hi Fi TV
SERVICE
FAST--GUARANTEED
Free Pick Up & Delivery
Hi Fi Studio
121 W. Washington
across from Old German
NO 8-7942C

HELP STAMP OUT POVERTY??
Customers wanted with sense or humor. Wild, wacky
T Shirts for the in and out crowd. The latest for Non-
on-Comformitsts, Individuals, Swingers, Beats and Go-
Gos.
Heavy, rugged duty White T Shirts with 2 inch dark
letterming. Send $3.00, we pay tax and postage. Money
back guarantee. Order below check off slogan and size
S-M-L-XL.
EXAM SELLER
MEMBER OLYMPIC CRIBBING TEAM
___PIECE CORP WORKER ____
AVOID THE RUSH-FLUNK NOW
I TAPPA KEG FRATERNITY
HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT
UNDERPRIVILEGED
I FELTA THIGH FRATERNITY
AVOID THE RUSH-DRINK NOW
SEX BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS
PANTY RAIDER
I SWINGER T-SHIRT CO.
P.O. BOX 2672
I ANAHEIM, CALIF.
I NAME
l SCHOOL
l ADDRESSSTATE
l HOME ADDRESS _STATE

i

I

U.'

Have

a Good Summerf!

oU

FA

UE

Educational Aids Develop'ed

(Continued from Page 1)
For problem solving which in-
volves computers, but which a
small university could not main-
tain by itself, time-sharing tech-
niques could allow several schools
to make full-time use of a single
coml uter.
Finally, the use of machine
techniques in self teaching will
undoubtedly work a great change
on the nature of education. The
University Center for Research on
Learning and Teaching (CRLT)
is at the frontier in practical ap-
plications.
Much of the work at CRLT has
focused on the automated study
carrel. Similar- to the library car-
rel, it may contain a tape recorder,
slide and film projector, or a
television screen. Dummy carrels
at the center have a computer
console which ties into the IBM
center at New York. The teacher,
of course, must translate the in-
formation from printed sources
into a coniputer-based program,
but Prof. Karl Zinn, developer of
the computer-assisted instruction
(CAI, believes this to be no draw-
back.
"It is clear that a computer can
be use for instruction," he indi-
cates, 'even though the teacher
and author know little about the

machine and less about its opera-
tion. Rowever, although many per-
sons have become involved in this
field, the amount. of .usable in-
struction material is pitifully
slight."
"The center will use the.Univer-
sity's 360 computer when ,it be-
comes' ;operational in the fall,"
says Zinn. "The student or author
will not be aware that the com-
puter. facility processing his re-
quests is also, doing a variety of
other jobs for many other people."
Last summer the University and
the center proposed a state-wide
program which, would include
computer services . for college
teaching and learning. The Inter-
institutional Committee on Infor-
mation Systems, formed this year,
while concerned with general serv-
ices, is also considering computer
instruction and information re-
trieval. The University, Michigan
State and Wayne State have been
pooling librarians, computer tech-
nicians and educators in attempts
to come up with a program which
will link their library systems.
The possibilities for the future
are many and unpredictable, but
surely the better education of more
people will be made a reality as
electronic aids remove the age old
barriers of time and geographic
location in the education process.

DIGITAL LOGIC HANDBOOK
A Complete engineering
guide Consisting of 328
pages of circuits, applica-
tions, module specification,
and. notes on analog-
digital conversion theroy
and techniques.

*1

This may be your
LAST CHANCE!
To choose from one of the
Largest IP record selections
in-the Midwest!
We have everything from Bach to the Beatles
at

EVERY ENGINEER SHOULD HAVE ONE
MAIL THE ATTACHED COPY TO:
DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION
1 3853 Research Park Drive
I Ann Arbor, Michigan
I Please send a free copy of the digital logic handbook to:
I Namen Under-Grad Grad {
Address Engineering School.....
F._. - __________________________._ - _ -...__ .._ - - - - -._ _....._...- -..__..... - -

417
E. Liberty

MUSIC SHOP /

Phone
662-0675

I

i

MUSIC TO RELAX WITH

-A

SPECIAL FOR EXAM WEEK-

discount records, ®nc.
300 S. State (corner of Liberty) & 1235 S. University (in University Towers)
ALL JAZZ, SOUND TRACKS

tip

and BROADWAY

SHOWS

ON SALE FOR NINE DAYS (Today thru Saturday, April 23)

AT
THESE
GREAT
SAVINGS

were 379
NOW
were 579
NOW

65

were 479 33
NOW
were 67
NOW

1

4

99

f(

PLUS IN-STORE SPECIALS!

1N['s... CONQUER THE BIG CITY..- and never leave home!

Come to Mount Sinai Hospital-and New York City is yours! Like so many
bright, attractive nurses who have made Mount Sinai their home, you
will have more benefits including a high starting salary, more pleasure,
more meaningful. experience. Nowhere else in the world will you have
more opportunities for friendship, for education and for advancement.
Nowhere else will you have such attention paid to all your relocation
nn a. . ret* . w mr'.ic. n m uAwill rceiue hen with AdIcation including

r__ ._- ------------------------"'
Personnel Administrator-Professional Nursing 1
. THE MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL
I Fifth AVe. and 100th St. ^"10I
New York, N. Y.100-29
I I
I Please send me your brochure about nursing I
I a+ Moun+ ini.I

AND FREE COFFEE AT ALL TIMES
AT THE SOUTH UNIVERSITY STORE
SO-TAKE A STUDY-BREAK
AND RELAX AT

A

I

II

I

i I

7

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan