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April 15, 1966 - Image 11

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-15

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1966"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE ELEVEN

'M' Diamondmen, CMU Do Battle in Twin Billi

By BILL LEVIS
After almost a month's delay,
spring has finally hit Ann Arbor
with temperatures reaching into
the 60's starting Wednesday.
Along with her annual appearance
also caime that of baseball.
Th Michigan diamondmen made.
their' home opener an enjoyable
one Wednesday as they defeated
the University of Detroit 9-3.
This weekend, as spring continues
to grow, the Wolverines are sched-
uled to play Central Michigan in
a doubleheader Saturday taking
place at Ferry Field at 1:30 p.m.
That's Not All
This is by no means the only
baseball action that will take place
in Ann Arbor before the college
students head for home or prepare
to tackle the rigors of another
semester -of college. On Monday,
while most will be studying for
our upcoming finals, the ball play-
ers will face the Irish of Notre
Dame in a single game at 3:30.
The Maize and Blue will then
open their Big Ten season against
Indiana in a 3:30 p.m. game on
Friday, April 22, at Ferry Field.
The next day, Michigan, runner-

up last year, will match skills
with the defending conference
champs, Ohio State, at 1 p.m.
After that, the Wolverines will
leave Ann Arbor, not to return
until early May.
Concerning the doubleheader
against CMU, Coach Moby Bene-
dict stated that, "Larry Guidi will
start the first game. We're not
sure about who will start the sec-
and game as of yet."
He also noted that he wants
to see more of the boys play be-
fore the conference season. He
said that "(Mel) Wakabayashi,
(Jim) Berline, and (Andy) Fish-
er will all play. It is important
that everyone plays, that they get
into the groove.
Bench Needs Experience
"It is most important that in
conference games that we have a
bench with some game experience.
"This way, you can stick boys
into a game, say against Minne-
sota, and know that they all will
play pretty well."
Like Michigan, Central journey-
ed on a southern tour of their
own. Still, the Chippewas are not
too well known by the Wolverines.

if this guy has a sore arm, a his leg while making a triple Benedict noted that "we nope that
weak ankle, or what." Wednesday against Detroit. Doug the hand is healing. It seems to
CMU Infield Set Nelson, a sophomore, will probably be much better now. He even play-
CMU is pretty well set in its start in his place on Saturday. ed against Detroit on Wednesday."
infield alignment with captain Don Mantle in CF? Moby Tickled
Bach at second base and Gene Coach Benedict noted that "we The Michigan mentor then went
Kral at first base. The other two hope to stay away from injury on to discuss the whole team.
returnees are Tom Kranwczyk at with the conference season start- "They are all good ballplayers.
shortstop and Pat O'Keefe at third. ing next weekend. You know that So far, they have done a good
The outfield, pitching and catch- Casey Stengel used to say that 'I job. I have been tickled with the
ing choices seem to be up for don't manage quite as well if way they have hustled, just been
grabs, though. Mickey Mantle isn't playing in doing things. They make mistakes:
The only sure outfield starter centerfield.' Well, I don't manage but so do the pros. The impor-
Will be Fletcher Miller, a confer- quite as well is some of my start- tant thing is that they learn
ence first team pick. Letter win- ers are out." from them. The thing that I am
ners Dave Harmsen and Leo Du- The sufferingest member of the pleased about is that they have
rocher, no relation to the Lip, seem walking wounded would have to all played hard."
to have the inside tracks on the be outfielder Dick Schryer. The With the Big Ten season only
other two berths.. Michigan slugger, leader in RBI's a week away, Coach Benedict just
The catching job is being fought last year, has encountered one hopes that "everyone is healthy,
among three sophomores. mishap after another. that the team stays intact and
eFirstFirst, he was hit with a throat that we get good weather."
Notre Dame infection down in Arizona. While Still, there is one more thing
Coach Benedict and the Wol- the team was there, Schryer also that the coach and team are hop-
verines are mainly looking ahead suffered a bruised hand. He wasn't ing for . . . a Big Ten Champion-
to the important Big Ten season even able to grip a bat. Coach ship.

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DICK SCHRYER

Thinclads Visit Ohio;
Relays, Frosh Ready

Coach Benedict explained that
when you meet a team once a year
it is very hard to scout them, espe-
cially when there is no real time
for scouting.
The Michigan coach went on to
explain that he receives most of
his information on non-conference
opponents from the ballplayers
themselves. "The boys have play-
ed against some of the opposition
in the summer in sandlot and in
Basin League play. Their reports
are sometimes better than the bro-
chures the schools send out.
"The school may say a guy hit
.750 but against whom? Our ball-
players can tell me who and also

though. Still, Michigan has to face
Notre Dame Monday before the
opener Friday against Indiana.
The Irish won 18 of 35 last
year and this year they face a
bigger rebuilding job than they
ever expected. To start things off,
ND lost four front-line pitchers
via graduation. The infield was
to have revolved around two-year
veterans, Al Kristowski and Dan
McGinn. Both have been signed
by the majors.
The Maize and Blue have had
their problems this year but it is
hoped that these will be corrected
before the start of the conference
season. First baseman Chan Si-
monds came up with a pulled
hamstring muscle in the back of

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IN MICHIGAN
DAYS, EVENINGS, SATURDAYS
For Graduate Students, Upperclassmen in
SOCIAL SCIENCES and RELATED FIELDS
A survey research project is scheduled for this sum-
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families. It is sponsored by a research unit of The
University of Michigan.
Needed are persons who will be living at home in
the southern half of the Lower Peninsula (excluding
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Also needed will be persons living at home in the Up-
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Call 764-8459 for further information

By BOB McFARLAND
The stuffy atmosphere of Yost
Field House isn't the most condu-
cive place for the holding of a
track meet-or a practice for that
matter.
And- this isn't meant to be an-
other slam against much-abused
Yost. A Wolverine thinclad will
tell you that the air indoors seems
a little less refreshing, whether it
be in Yost, Jenison Field House in
East Lansing, or the magnificent
Cobo' Hall.
It may seem psychological to
the spectator who doesn't feel a
chain clamped around his chest
when he walks in a building, but
when you're propelling yourself at
top speed for 60-yards or plodding
off two miles (16 laps on the 220-
yard oval), it does make a dif-
ference.
Cinders Hurt!
The cindermen, with the . ex-
ception of the sprinters and hur-
dlers, aren't exactly enamored
with the 220-yard track either..
The tight curves have a marked
reffect on the times, and more
than one man has spent hours
picking cinders out of his knee,
after making a turn too fast.
The weather dictates the site of
track meets, though, and the par-
ticipants must accept their fate
for the indoor months. Now, it
appears that the worst is over
(both weather-wise and perform-
ance-wise), with the Wolverines
chalking up several successes in
their outdoor debut last week.
Attribute the records to the
larger track, the mental exaltation
of performing outside, or better
conditionining, but the first tulip
couldn't burst into bloom more
brilliantly than the Wolverine
cindermen performed last week at
the Kentucky Relays-.
Ohio Tomorrow
Tomorrow, they journey to the
Ohio Relays at Athens, Ohio, to
soak up more of the great. out-
doors, Both. varsity and freshman
will make the trip, the freshman
competing unattached because of
Big Ten regulations.
Michigan will be throwing most
of its official entries into the re-
lay barrel, with the promising
freshman squad entering the in-
diVdual events. The mile relay,
the distance medley relay, the 440-
yard relay, the 880-yard relay,
and the two-mile relay are sched-
uled on the-Wolverine card.
The foursome of Elmo Morales,
Cecil Norde, Alex McDonald, and
Jim Mercer are slated for the two
mile. This group, anchored by Mc-
Donald's blistering 1:52.6 half,
took the event at Kentucky last
week with a 7:34.4 clocking.
Fred Grove, Clive Laidley, Mar-
ion Hoey, and Bob Gerometta will
comprise the mile relay unit for
Michigan. Gerometta, running the
L

final leg in bluegrass country,
managed a :47.8 split.
Finishing second last week be-
fore they were disqualified for run-
ning out of their lane in the 440-
yard relay, the Michigan thinclads
should be a good bet in this event.
Taking part in the sprint will be
Wolverine speedsters Dorie Reid,
Willie Brown, Clive Laidley, and
Carl Ward.
Moving into the individual
events, the Wolverines will have
their established stars, Jack Har-
vey and George Canamare, com-
peting in the field. Harvey, who
has been tossing the shot 58' with
prune Juiceregularity lately, will
be attempting to break the 60'
barrier, while Canamare will be
tryingto smash his personal high
of 15'9' in the pole vault.
Entered in the 440-yard dash,
Ron Kutschinski heads, the list of
freshman entries. He made the
jaunt to Lexington last week and
surprised the open field in the
660-yard run with a sizzling 1:17.5
first place effort. The Michigan
varsity record, set last year by
Grove, is 1:18.8 for the 660 dis-
stance, and the Big Ten mark is
only :00.1 below Kutschinski's
clocking. There will be more to
come from the Grand Rapids run-
ner tomorrow.
Highly regarded Jim Olson and
Tom Kearney, Wolverine freshman
milers, will cause some apprehen-
sion to their elders in the mile run.
Olson, beginning to reach top con-
dition, had a 4:06.5 time to his
credit as a high school senior last
season.
Sit back and inhale that fresh
spring air. The Wolverine cinder-
men are.

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Please don't
z lupf Sprite,
It makes
plenty of noise
al by itself
Sprite, you recall, is
the soft drink that's
so tart and tingling,
we just couldn't keep
it quiet.
Flip its lid and it -
really flips.
Bubbling, fizzing,
gurgling, hissing and
carrying on all over
the place.
An almost exces-
sively lively drink.
Hence, to zlupf is
to err.
What is zlupfing?
Zlupfing is to drinking what
smacking one's lips is to
eating
It's the staccato buzz you
make when draining the last few
deliciously tangy drops of
Sprite from the bottle with a
straw.
Zzzzzlllupf!
It's completely uncalled for.
Frowned upon in polite society.
And not appreciated on campus
either.
But If zlupfing Sprite
is absolutely essential to'your
enjoyment; if a good healthy
zlupf is your idea of heaven,
well...all right.
But have a heart. With a
drink as noisy as Sprite, a
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way.
SPRITE. SO TART AND
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The definitive cartoon book about the University of Michigan
COMING NEXT WEEK TO LOCAL
BOOKSTORES & NEWSSTANDS

GEORGE WEIN presents
The Newport Festivals
The Newport Jazz Festival
July 1, 2, 3,4,1966
Four evening concerts; Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Three afternoon
concerts; Saturday, Sunday, Monday. Featuring: Count Basle, Ruby Braff,
Dave Brubeck, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald,
Bud Freeman, Stan Getz, Dizzy Gillespie, Woody Herman, Herbie Mann,
Thelonious Monk, Jimmy Smith, Joe Williams, and many others,
Evenings: $3.50, 4.50, 5.50 Afternoons: $3.00
The Newport Opera Festival
July12,13,14,15,16,1966
Presenting the Metropolitan Opera Company oftNew York. Major stars,
Chorus, and Orchestra in four operas in- concert performance and five
afternoons of musical workshops, panels, and lectures.'
Tuesday, LA BOHEME Wednesday, CARMEN! Thursday, (rain daie)
Friday, LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR Saturday, AIDA (Sunday, rain date)
Evenings: $3.50, 5.50, 7.50 Afternoons: $2.00
The NewportFolk Festival
July 21, 22, 23, 24, 1966
Four evening concerts: Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday. Three All-Day
Workshops; Friday, Saturday, Sunday.
Featuring: Theo Bikel, Oscar Brand, Brownie McGee and Sonny Terry, Judy
Collins, Bob Dylan, Jack Elliott, Mimi and Dick Farina, Flatt and Scruggas,
Carolyn Hester, Bessie Jones, Phil Ochs, The Pennywhistlers, Jean Ritchie,
Grant Rogers, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Howling Wolf, and others.
Evenings: $3.50; 4.50, 5.50 All Day Workshops: $2.00
SPECIAL DISCOUNT: deduct 20% from the list price of tickets for all
concerts If purchased by mail before May 15th.
For information, write Newport Jazz, Opera, or Folk Festival. For tickets
specify dates and Festival. Make checks payable to the specific festival you
plan to attend.
For accommodations, write the Newport Chamber of Commerce, Newport,
Rhode Island 02840.
If you're age 12 through 21, you can fly to the Newport Festivals for half
fare on American Airlines, creator of the American Youth Plan, via
Providence, R. I. To become eligible, just send $3.00 with the coupon below
and receive your Youth Plan ID, plus a free copy of AA's Go Go American
with $50 worth of discount coupons.
---- -n -- ----- -- - - - - -

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