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April 15, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-15

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FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGETIMEE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1968 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

U.S.

Opens

Way

for

Visits

Buddhists Triumph as Regime
Agrees To Hold Early Election

SB y

Red

Chinese

Scientists)

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Peking Fails
To Respond
To Proposal
Offer Would Bring
Foreign Scholars
To American Colleges
WASHINGTON - (') - In a
further broadening of United
States policy toward Red China,
the State Department said yester-
day that qualified mainland Chi-
nese scientists and scholars will be
allowed to come to study at Ameri-
can universities.
So far Peking has shown no en-
thusiasm about this offer, nor
about others which might bring
some thawing of the long freeze
between the two countries, U.S.
sources said.
Some eight years ago, the U.S.
okayed travel to Communist China
by U.S. newsmen. Last December
it said U.S. health specialists
could go. Last month it cleared
visits by U.S. scientists and schol-
ars.
China's Doors Closed
With few exceptions, however,
the stridently anti-American Pek-
ing regime haskept its doors clos-
ed in the face of the modifying
U.S. policy.
State Department press officer
Robert J. McCloskey said yester-
day that "the U.S. Is prepared to
permit American universities to
invite Chinese scientists and scho-
lars to visit those universities,"
and "the Chinese Communists
have been advised of this."
Without identifying the U.S.
universities, he said several have
inquired of the State Department
in recent weeks about invitations
for visits by Red Chinese scholars
and scientists.
No Peking Response
He said also he knows of no
Peking response. As for National-
ist China, he said the matter has
been discussed with this U.S. ally.
A He did not give the Nationalist re-
action.
While Washington would prefer
that Communist China act accord-
ing to the principle of exchanging
visits, he said the U.S. is not in-
sisting on a one-for-one trade on
each visit.
Whilethe U.S. does not recog-
nize the Peking government, it
holds periodic ambassadorial talks
at Warsaw with the Red Chinese
ambassador there and presumably
used this channel to outline its
news policy on visits by scientists
and scholars.
But generally, U.S. officials say,
the Peking representatives have
rebuffed various U.S. suggestions
unless the U.S. abandons its sup-
port of Nationalist China. This the
U.S. refuses to do.
See Change in
Relations with
Red Chinese
LONDON WP)-Senior diplomatic
officials reported yesterday the
United States has told Red China
that Washington is ready to dis-
cuss a normalization of relations
and seating of a Peking delegation
in the United Nations.
First Chinese reaction was to
rebuff the American initiative and
raise Peking's price to include U.S.
withdrawal from Viet Nam and a
global disarmament agreement,
agreement, the officials said.
In Washington, State Depart-
ment press officer Robert J. Mc-

Closkey denied the report.
The reported American feeler
and Chinese response were said
to have taken place at exchanges
in Warsaw between Ambassadors
John A. Gronouski and Wang
Kou-chang. A qualified U.S. au-
thority here said he could neither
confirm nor deny the report.
Envoys
American and Chinese envoys
have been meeting since 1955 and
Gronouski's encounter with Wang,
last March 16 was the 129th in
the series. They are to meet again
May 25 in Warsaw.
Clearly this could lead to U.S.
recognition of Peking and bring
changes in the U.S. political rela-
tionship with President Chiang
Kai-shek's Nationalist regime in,
Formosa.
IA APFNI

SENATE HEARINGS:
Assail Auto Industry Secrecy

{
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WASHINGTON (IP)-Auto critic
Ralph Nader yesterday assailed
what he termed the motor indus-
try's chrome curtain of secrecy
and said it masked a car manufac-
turer's use of $2 tires.
"The secrecy syndrome is also
an affliction of government agen-
cies in traffic safety," Nader said.
Speaking for the auto manu-
facturers, Ford Motor Co. Vice
President John S. Bugas insisted
the industry would cooperate in
"fishbowl" openness with a pro-
posed federal-state safety board
if its request for antitrust law
immunity were granted.,
Bugas emphasized at a Senate
hearing on President Johnson's
highway safety proposals that "the
automobile companies are not say-
ing 'hands off' to government on
vehicle safety."

Nader and Bugas testified at a
hearing of the Senate Public
Works subcommittee. Nader, a
Washington lawyer and author,
called secrecy a big roadblock in
the way of highway safety.
He also contended that insur-
ance companies have "received in-
demnification from auto com-
panies for claims paid when ve-
hicle defects have clearly been the
culpable cause of accident."
Lid of Secrecy
"Due to their unwillingness to
alienate the auto industry and
due to the ease of obtaining higher
rates and their unease at the
prospect of storing waters that
could overflow into pressure for
increased regulation," Nader said,
"insurance companies have main-
tained, under the soothing impact

of abundant investment income, a quality tires to their giant and
strict lid of secrecy-even with- uncompromising buyers."
holding notice of defects from Bugas testified the auto indus-
their own policyholders." try's position on establishing
At another point, Nader said. safety standards for cars had been
"It has been my experience that misunderstood.
no greater enemy to the cause of "We fully recognize that vol-
auto safety exists than secrecy- untary industry action will not
in industry and government." suffice by itself," Bugas said.
As an example, Nader said that He said an industry safety board
when the Senate Commerce Com- it proposed would operate "within
mittee was wrestling last year a framework of governmental reg-
with the problem of tire stan- ulation" under a federal-state
dards "it would have been instruc- commission.
tive to know that Chevrolet Divi- Bugas, speaking for the Auto-
sion purchases its tires from the mobile Manufacturers Association,
tire companies for an f.o.b. price said that a proposal he advanced
of about $2." at another hearing last week for
Uncompromising Buyers motor vehicle safety board within
The knowledge, Nader said, the industry to establish voluntary
"might have led to a greater un- safety standards was not intended
derstanding of the tire companies" to exclude the federal government.
predicament in having to sell sub- "The safety board in no sense
would avert or supplant govern-
* e ment standards," Bugas declared.

SAIGON - UR)- Buddhists
exulted yesterday at a decree of
Premier Nguyen Cao Ky's military
government for election of a civil-
ian regime within three to five!
months.
Thousands staged a peaceful;
victory march in Saigon, which
was torn by anti-American, anti-
government riots before the Budd-
hist hierarchy calledaa halt and
proclaimed its over-all command
of the dissidents last Saturday.
(But two Buddhist leaders de-
manded last night that KYand
his two top assistants step down
immediately, United Press Inter-
national and the New York Times
reported.
(Thich Thien Minh, reportedly
backed by anti-government stu-
dent and military leaders in the
big northern cities of Da Nang
and Hue and Tran Quang Thuan,
secretary-general of the new Bud-
dhist "struggle force" were insist-
ing that the ruling military junta
hand over the reins of power to
civilians even during the transi-
tion period leading to elections.)
Thich Ho Giac, the Buddhist In-
stitute's director of lay affairs
and a cochairman of the actioon
committee that coordinated anti-
government pressures, said the
main Buddhist demands have
been met.
Next must come establishment
of election methods, listing of par-

ty candidates, and designation of
areas where voting can be consid-
ered safe. So far as could be deter-
mined, no officials have as yet
tackled those problems.
Because of Viet Cong influence
in the countryside, only the resi-
dents of town and city areas could
be regarded as casting ballots
safely and freely if the election
were held immediately.
Like a series of other govern-
ments since a Buddhist uprising
promoted destruction of President
Ngo Dinh Diem's regime in 1963,
the ruling 10-man military direc-
tory presumably is bowing out.
Renewed Service
Its members are expected to
disperse for renewed service in the
armed forces when civilians are
designated to take the helm. Ky
has said he wishes to concentrate
on duty in the air force, which he
commands.
Inhibiting effects of the political
agitation on the war effort were
illustrated in casualty reports for
the week of April 3-9. For the
first time in any seven-day period,
combat deaths in the U.S. armed
forces exceeded those of their Vi-
etnamese allies.
With battalions of Vietnamese
troops diverted to riot control and
other suburban assignments,.Viet-
namese losses in the field drop-
ped to 67 killed and 204 missing,

plus an unannounced number of
wounded.
Ninety-five Americans were
killed, 501 wounded and four were
missing. Of the other allies, 15
were killed and 25 wounded. The
Vietnamese armed forces, about
twice as large as the foreign con-
tingent, ordinarily suffer casual-
ties two or three times larger.
Among developments abroad
was Soviet criticism of the U.S.
presence in Viet Nam at the 17-
nation disarmament talks in Ge-
neva.
Soviet delegate Alexei Roshchin,
categorically rejecting virtually
every western proposal on disarm-
ament and related measrues, de-
clared the United States has "fla-
grantly violated the 1954 Geneva
accords and is waging aggressive
war" in Viet Nam.
The British Foreign Office rul-
edout the idea that Britain might
send a token military force to
Viet Nam. Britain and the Soviet
Uniono shared the co-chairman-.
ship of the 1954 Geneva confer-
ence, which split up French Indo-
china.,
What revived civilian rule of
South Viet Nam will mean In the
conduct of the war-and even the
U.S. presence-remains to be de-
termined. Among banners display-
ed by riotous demonstrators last
week was the demand: "End the
war immediately."

--E A 1A 7 1 toA

Report South Africa Considers
Halting Flow of Oil to Rhodesia

LONDON ()-Foreign Secretary
Michael Stewart summoned Am-
bassador Sir Hugh Stephenson
home yesterday from South Africa
for urgent consultations on the
oil-for-Rhodesia crisis.
The action was disclosed by the
Foreign Office as unofficial re-
ports reached British authorities
suggesting Prime Minister Hendrik
Verwoerd's government intends to
ban the passage of a Greek tank-
er's 15,000-ton oil cargo through
South Africa to Rhodesia.
The tanker Manuela, controlled
by an international syndicate
seeking to break the UN oil em-
bargo on successionist Rhodesia,
is now docked in Durban, South
Africa.
Ioanna V
In the Mozambique port of
Beira, Portuguese authorities took
over control of Manuela's sister
tanker Ioanna V, which is ready
to pump her 18,000-ton load into

the pipeline that runs to Rhodesia,
189 miles away. Ioanna V has been
struck off the shipping registers
of Greece and Panama in the past
week and now is stateless.
Stephenson will give his ap-
praisal of South Africa's evolving
attitude to the Rhodesia crisis to
Stewart and to Prime Minister
Harold Wilson. On his return to
Pretoria, Stephenson will convey
to the South Africans latest Brit-
ish thinking on international
moves to oust Prime Minister Ian
Smith's breakaway white minority
Rhodesian regime.
As the British see things now,
South Africa could become a tar-
get of direct UN attack if it re-
fuses to comply with the Security
Council call on all states to boy-
cott the Smith regime.
To some extent, British inform-
ants report Stephenson's flying
visit is intended to serve as a sub-
stitute for direct talks between a

British government minister and
South Africa's leaders.
The South African attitude of
benevolent neutrality has resulted
in a flow of oil and other aid,
to Rhodesia which the British see
as a breach of the spirit and letter
of UN resolutions. This has had
the effect of heightening Afri-
can-Asian pressures for the im-
position of sanctions against South
Africa as well as against Rho-
desia.

Lobbying Effort
Sen. Fred R. Harris (D-Okla)
asked Bugas if he felt the industry
could make "a better lobbying
effort" at the state level than :n
Washington.
"I don't think so," Bugas re-
plied. But he said the industry is
much more concerned about hav-
ing one man with authority to set
standards than a commission of
51 people, representing each of
the 50 states and the District of
Columbia.
It would be "an impossible job,"
Bugas said for any one man to
take on the job of setting stan-
dards for the industry. He observ-
ed that the Ford Motor Co. alone
has some 1,000 engineers.

In conjunction with the American Studies Student Association
THE CINEMA GUILD Presents
A. 3-DAY BOGART BONANZA!
Exams got you down? JOIN BOGEY and be mellow!
, Monday, April 18th "CROSS PACIFIC"
BOGEY, the reluctant spy with Sydney Greenstreet
and Mary Astor-directed-by John Huston.
! Tuesday, April 19th "THE BIG SLEEP"
BACALL and BOGART in the most famous of all Bogart Flicks
! Wednesday, April 20, "ROARING 20's"
Nostalgia? Crime! Bootleg liquor! Co-stars James Cagney.
Great Fun-Seldom Seen!!

All shows 7 & 9
in the
Architecture
Auditorium

A OVI DPRICE?
still only
CINIMs 5

YT
YOU TOO (TWO)

CINEMA II
celebrates
THE END OF CLASSES
with
FRANCE'S GREATEST
CRIME THRILLER
JULES DASSIN'S
ENGLISH SOUND TRACK
by the Director of
N EVER ON SUNDAY
and TOPKAPI
Fri. and Sat., 7 and 9 P.M.

s'

I

Correction: Error in Wednesday Ad
All Shows at 7 and 9

Ulv/iwerit, m icca

f0

'9

S"itv

"'U

CAN BOOK.
AT THE LEAGUE

CO-EDUCATIONAL STUDY SPACE
AVAILABLE IN ANN ARBOR'S
QU I ETEST SPOT.
2nd floor of the MICHIGAN LEAGUE
Service of
UAC and the MICHIGAN LEAGUE

I

Aid. A

50c

Information 665-6756

..... .......mim.. .. ... .. .. ... . .... m m m mm .. .
I I
I *
Tonight at 7 and 9
I I
* ROBERT BRESSON'S
A II ALE f~fAnrnf

-thnK
4(..
HEAR;
"Dominilque
"Brother John"
"Its A Miracle'
and other
enna hit

-thnK
.1V
~Jr .ti

INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS
1966-67
CHORAL UNION SERIES
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ........................ Saturday, October 8
JEAN MARTINSON, Conductor
GUIOMAR NOVAES, Pianist ..........:. . ...............Wednesday, October 12
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ................ . . ....Thursday, November 3
SEJI OZAWA, Conductor
AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE...........................Thursday, November 17
THE CONSUL (Menotti) N.Y. CITY OPERA COMPANY .,... (8:00) Sunday, November 20
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA .. .................. (2:30) Sunday, January 8
SIXTEN EHRLING, Conductor
WINNIPEG BALLET COMPANY ....................... . .... Saturday, February 4
SHIRLEY VERRETT, Mezzo-soprano........................Monday, March 13
STOCKHOLM UNIVERSITY CHORUS....:..................... Thursday, April 6
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA .............. . . . ......... Saturday, April 8
Season Tickets: $25.00-$20.00-$17.00-$1 4.00-$12.00
EXTRA SERIES
NATIONAL ORCHESTRA OF BELGIUM ... .......... . ... Wednesday, October 19
ANDRE CLUYTENS, Conductor
EMIL GILELS, Pianist.... . ......................... Tuesday, November 8
TOSCA (Puccini) N.Y. CITY OPERA COMPANY ........ (2:30) Sunday, November 20
MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ... . .. . ....... (2:30) Sunday, February 26
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI, Cnoductor
JOSE GRECO AND SPANISH DANCE COMPANY ... . .... . Wednesday, March 8
Season Tickets: $12.50-$10.00-$8.50-$7.00-$6.00
CHAMBER ARTS SERIES
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA OF PHILADLPHIA,...... ...... Saturday, September 24
ANSHEL BRUSILOW, Conductor
MOSCOW CHAMBER ORCHESTRA .. . ....................Saturday, October 22
RUDOLF BARSHAI, Conductor
CHRISTIAN FERRAS, Violinist .................... ......Monday, November 14
ANDRES SEGOVIA, Guitarist ..................... . . . .... Monday, January 9
MUSIC FROM MARLBORO (Instrumental Chamber Music) ..,.... Monday, January 30
JACQUELINE DU PRE, Cellist, and
STEPHEN BISHOP, Pianist .... . . . . ....... . .... Monday, March 20
BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS ..... . . .... . ...... (2:30) Sunday, April 9
Season Tickets: $1 8.00-$15.0-$1 2.00

I
"
U
I
I

w A R LJLMriLu

with Hardy Krueger

The true story . of an attempted
escape from a Nazi prison by a
* member of the French underground
I I
Saturday and Sunday
r I
I ___ . w" a 1 *K 1 .E1 A hN . 33 /V n3 l

ii

I

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