100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 15, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE WO T~E MIHI--N---L

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1966

Expect Death, of Iraqi President To Cause
A Struggle Between Nationalist Factions

World News Roundup

BEIRUT, Lebanon WP) - The
death of President Abdel Salam
Aref of Iraq in a helicopter crash
may loose a powerful struggle be-
tween pro-Egyptian and Arab na-
tionalist factions, informants said
yesterday.
Iraq imposed a tight curfew,
closed its airports, and sealed its
borders. The radio in Baghdad,
the capital, gave no hint of trou-
ble although it asked the people
Paphet on
Housing Is
Now Ready
Gives Information
Regarding New Eight
Month Lease Option
By SUSAN ELAN
The Off-Campus Housing bro-
chure, long delayed due to print-
ing problems, is now available at
the Student Activities Building.
The purpose of this brochure is
to acquaint students, parents, and
Ann Arbor property owners with
the University's off-campus hous-
ing program and to describe the
Off-Campus Housing Bureau's
serv ices.
The booklet is an enlarged ver-
sion of last year's pamphlet with
two major innovations. Behind the
photograph of theb'campus on the
cover, the new brochure includes
a checklist of things to look for
when choosing an apartment or
furnished room, and an explana-
tion of the eight-month lease op-
tion.
Eight-Month Lease
The section on the eight-month
lease option explains that several
property owners are offering
eight-month leases with accom-
panying increases in rents to com-
pensate for added operational costs
and rental risks.
To encourage the use of eight-
month leases the University will
no longer take disciplinary action
against students who do not meet
the requirements of a year lease
while they are not enrolled in
classes.
In spite of this, University Tow-
ers is the only major apartment
using the eight-month lease op-
tion, and it will raise rents on
-ight-month leases by 25 per cent.
r'The checklist was designed to
bring to the attention of the
student the important factors to
be considered when choosing an
apartment. It is a list of 25
partment features such as cer-
tification by the city of Ann Ar-
bor, adequacy of storage room
b r ad q ay o st rg rom11proper. lighting, and general size
in relation to the number of oc-
cupants. Each feature 'is to be
graded by the student from excel-
lent to poor.
Attractiveness
It is hoped that this will make
the student consider more than
just the attractiveness of furni-
ture and modern conveniences
when choosing an apartment.
A section on costs indicates in-
creased rents for next year. The
booklet states that "each student
may expect to pay between $50
(very low) and $75 as his month-
ly share in two-, three-, four-, or
five-man furnished apartment."
The rest of the brochure dis-
cusses eligibility and procedures
for moving off-campus, inventory
cards, parking and transportation,
and complaints and mediation.
See Europe for
Less than $100

Your summer in Europe for less
than $100 (including transpor-
tation). For the first time in
travel history you can buy di-
rectly from the Tour Wholesaler
saving you countless dollars. Job
offers may also be obtained with
no s tr in g s attached. For
a "do - it - yourself" pamphlet
with jobs, discount tours and
applications sends $1 (for ma-
terial, handling, air mail) to
Dept. V., International Travel
Est.,, 68 Herrengasse, Vaduz,
Liechtenstein (Switzerland).

"to be steadfast in the face of this
national disaster."
When news came of the death of
Aref, 45, in a crash Wednesday
night near the Persian Gulf port
of Basra, the man regarded wide-
ly as a possible successor to the
presidency was in'Moscow.
Abdel Rahman Aref
This is Aref's brother, Gen. Ab-
del Rahman Aref, army chief of
staff, who was in the Soviet Union
on an arms buying mission. A dis-
patch from Moscow said he would
fly back to Iraq today.
Should the general become pres-
ident, he presumably would fol-
low his brother's policy of fav-
oring union with President Gamal
Abdel Nasser's United Arab Re-
public. Burned by the breakup of
his union with Syria, Nasser has
reacted cautiously to Iraqi merger
proposals.
Pitted against the pro-U.A.R.
faction are army men and politi-
cians who say it would be foolish

to give Nasser, whose nation is
poor, access to Iraq's oil millions.
Premier Abdel Rahman Bassaz
will be acting president until the
cabinet and the Defense Coun-
cil, both made up mainly of rank-
ing army officers, meet to elect a
president within a week, Baghdad
radio said.
A state funeral was set for to-
morrow and a month of official
mourning, with flags flying half
staff, was proclaimed.
Killed with Aref when the heli-
copter crashed and burned were
nine other persons, including In-
terior Minister Maj. Gen. Abdel
Latif Daraji, Industry Minister
Mustafa Abdullah, the governor
of Basra Province and the secre-
tary-general of the presidential.
palace staff.
Baghdad radio gave this ac-
count:
The helicopter took off from Al
Qurrah, where Aref had spoken
at a rally in a stadium, for Basra.

Two other helicopters carrying of-
ficials and journalists followed. E
Aref's helicopter vanished into
the center of a sand storm and the1
last word from the pilot was: "I
cannot see anything."
The two other helicopters avoid-
ed the storm and returned to the
stadium. One pilot leaped from
the cockpit yelling: "I have lost
contact with the president's heli-t
copter!"
Desert troops set out to lookc
for it but at dawn, with the heli-
copter still missing, 10 planes took
off from Basra, which lies on the
Shatt al Arab Riber that flows
into the Persion Gulf. A pilot spot-
ted the burned wreckage near the
village of Nashwah, east of the
river.
The Tehran paper Ettelaat re-
ported the Kurdish rebel radio
claimed a Kurd, Mohammed Am-
in Barzania, shot down the heli-
copter. The Kurds have been fight-
ing in Iraq for independence.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Three squad-
rons of Air Force F-100 jet fight-
ers will be sent from the United
States to Spain and permanently
based there, the Defense Depart-
ment said yesterday.
A Pentagon spokesman said the
move has no relationship to prob-
lems with France which has served
notice it wants all foreign mili-
tary forces and bases out of its
territory. There are no U.S. air
squadrons in France now.
The spokesman said the purpose
chiefly is to lessen the strain on
the U.S. Tactical Air Command
"If a man love me, he will keep
my words."
John 14:23
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium

which has been rotating three
squadrons of jets from the U.S.
to Italy and Turkey.
In the future, the ePntagon said,
the squadrons for Italy and Tur-
key will be provided by U.S. Air
Force units in Europe,
* * *
BONN-The U.S. and British
governments open three days of
talks today with West Germany
on how to keep French troops in
this country despite President
Charles de Gaulle's pull-out from
the North Atlantic Treaty Orga-
nization.
The three fear withdrawal of
French troops from West German
soil might give Moscow the idea
that the Atlantic alliance had been
badly weakened.
MEXICO CITY-President John-
son arrived yesterday on his first
visit to a foreign capital since he
assumed the presidency.
Although the White House had
emphasized the one-day trip is
an informal one, Johnson, his wife,
their 18-year-old daughter Luci
and the U.S. delegation were re-
ceived in the style of a state visit.

CINEMA II
presents
EXAM WEEK ESCAPISM
,4 kiwe 9e1aPRaL/
MONDAY, APRIL 18
TREASURE ISLAND

41

7 and 9 P.M.

Technicolor

Tuesday, April19
THE LEGEND OF-SLEEPY HOLLOW
and
THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS

7, 8:30 and-10 p.m.
in the MULTIPURPOSE
ROOM: Undergraduate
Library

technicolor
Admission
FREE

I

Nomintd5

DIAL
8-6416

Nominated for 5
Academv Awards!
Pa

The most touching
picture of the year!"
-N }'.Post
***** A film
to be cherished!"
-N.Y. Daily News
"Tremendous
emotional appeal !"
-N. Y. Herald Tribune
"Compelling
drama!"
N. Y. Journal
American

"NEWMAN responds sharply
bogeyman.

COMING
SOON
as a cool and clean-cut

M'

-Time Magazine
"A 100 PROOF PRIVATE EYE! See the movie by all

means. 'Harper' will get to you
a stiff uppercut."

with all the impact of
-Herald Tribune

2nd
Hit
Week
Plays
through
April 20

starring
SIDNEY
P0uTIER

SHELLEY
roWINTERS

"A SLAM-BANG MYSTERY YARN-crackles, snaps and
pops with all sorts of familiar surprises and bubbles of
biting dialogue."
-Crowther--N.Y. Times

aro ELIZABETH HARTMAN

NEXT
ATTRACTION
AT THE

- Wt 'ri

STARTS
APRIL 21st

Paul
Newman
is 'Harper

_111I

I

N--d

DIAL 8-6416

. ,.

"ONE OF THE BEST PICTURES I'VE SEEN
THIS YEAR!" Brenda i ,, The New Yorke,
"A PICTURE OF
DISTINCTION!" "PULSES WITH THE TEMPO
-Saturday Review OF YOUTH AND THE SOUND
"FASCINATING!" OF TRUTH -A TRIUMPH!"
--Tim Magazine -JudithCret, N Y. Herald Tribune
STARRING
R. LEE PLATT
PRESENTS R T _ _ _
RIATUSHING HAM
A RAYMONDUCIN___N__IMYSON______
STROSS PRODUCTION IIN A NEW FILM BY SIDNEY J. FURIE,

DIRECTOR OF IHE IPCRESS FILE'
EiTHKER R-;-rsI
"Love in Four Dimensions"
Coming: "How Not to Rob a Department Store"

4tO.CTARwRI N tiALPPAOICAt OROLM!
LAUREN JUUE ARTHUR JANET PAME ROBERt
BACALL *HARRISAHILLAI.E WIG IRNEWWAGNER
INI'TERS TECHNICOLOR' ?ANAVSON* FROM WARNER BROS. U

I

-r

A

DIA 66-i64 i111
DIAL 662-6264

STARTING SATURDAY
-= ". :

ENDING TODAY
DEAN MARTIN
in "THE SILENCERS"
At 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:05

3 PLAYS FOR AS LOW AS $4.50!
PTP SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE OPEN WEEKDAYS, 10-1, 2-5
SUBSCRIBE NOW ! DISCOUNTS !

I,

A~

"when
we get back,
we'll tell them what
a great party it wvas..*
until the booze ran out!"

4
4/

Only it wasn't a party. And it wasn't booze. It is one of the most unusual stories
ever fashioned for the screen: nine men-whose very lives turn on a startling, ironic
twist of fate in -a cauldron called a desert.
To make this dramatic best-seller into a film, producer-director Robert Aldrich chose
his stars from the award-winning talents of six nations. He led cast and crew into
the desert to forge a unique drama that has its own place in the sun. And now,
PHOENIX rises for all to see!

Ph. 483-4680
6&amxcs Ow CARPENTER ROCAO
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
-NOW SHOWING-
BIG KITS! .
SOUNSOL
METROCttO . a

i

I

I

I

I A ~ ~ ' - ~ ~ . ~ ' ~&.~ 4~~. W~t - *~d'~S.. JLU.W ,. @O u:&,,a . otw,.,,.

btunnmg success vl me i season.

i_

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan