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April 13, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-13

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PAv TWI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL, 13, 1966

,,,.

PA iE1TWOTE'CIA AL ENSA.ARL1,16

No Sharp Barbs Hit
By Going Barefoot

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE:
Regents To Act on Proposed Curriculum

,1.

By JAMES SCHUTZE
"Barefoot in the Park" is as
much fun as sister's boyfriend who
knows four and a half hours worth
of Reader's Digest jokes. With
each succeeding cute-ism, one
yearns a little harder to go drink
black coffee somewhere.
Playwright Neil Simon doesn't
know that a genuinely light and
delightful play must display quick
sharp insight and general purpose.
if it is to maintain its own gaie-
ty. His "Barefoot" comes across as
a marathon of barbershop wise-
crackery pasted together with
soapy philosophy and homely fa-
marity
JoaritMcall'faithfully commu-
nicates all the cuteness and flight
written into her role as a young
lightweight newlywed, and she
should probably be praised for mi-
tigating the role's sweetness wher-
ever possible with her own easy
personal charm..
A few broad brays indicate that
husband and wife are dissimilar
emotionally: they consider divorce:
they are reunited. That's fun.
And, of course, the play devel-
ops against the background of a
third rate apartment and a Jewish
mother. That's fun, too.

Woody Romoff saves the entire
production from anemia with an
ingeniously effective treatment of
middleaged dilettantism and attic
dwelling eccentricity in his role as
Victor Velasco, the mountain
climber who lives upstairs. Mr.
Velasco never ascends to his attic
home unless by scaling up from
some open window, an arrange-
ment which both satisfies his ath-
letic tastes and conserves his
sparse rent money.
Velasco very nearly extinguishes
newlyweds and mother with a pro-
gressive dinner of Albanian deli-
cacies found only in a few widely
separated corners of New York.
Romoff's frivolous aplomb and
charming off-handedness suffer
only for their undistinguished
company in this play.
We in the audience are persist-
entlyinvited to lean toward each
others' ears' and whisper, "isn't
that just like . . oh, it sounds like
something . . . well, that's you at
the breakfast table." Unfortunate-
ly, two and one half hours of mu-
tual smirk and giggling rib poke
leads to boundless hatred for all
mankind and for dramatists in
particular.

(Continued from Page 1)
course taught in their foreign lan-
guage after they have attained
proficiency.
Intensive Language
Experiments in intensive lan-
guage courses are now being car-
ried on in the plot project, in
preparation for the residential col-
lege language program. Marcia
Winik, Grad, a pilot project In-
tensive French instructor, says,
"This is definitely the way to learn
a language." One of her students

agrees.
learn a
French
Prof.
French
faculty
dential

"I never thought I could
language, but pilot project
is great.,
Jean Carduner of the
department, one of the
planners, says that resi-
college students will prob-

in the core program by giving stu-
dents the freedom to select semi-
nar sections and to pursue indi-
vidual topics in their classes.
The core program will take ap-
proximately the same amount of
time as the present literary col-
lege distribution requirements.
At the end of the sophomore
year all students will take a core-
course comprehensive examina-
tion.
Concentration programs will be
flexible and will be "adjusted to
suit the student's interests and
aims." Concentration in the Col-
lege will consist of studies in
dential college students should be
nature, rather than "mechanical
completion of a certain set of
courses," according to the faculty
report.
In some cases formal classes for
a student would be eliminated en-
tirely and replaced by directed
reading programs.rThe calendar
will also include regular periods
when students could be released
from formal classwork to do inde-
pendent reading and writing.
Prof. Bradford Perkins of the
history department, a member of
the faculty committee, says, "No
student whom I teach in the resi-

dential college will be able to get Faculty planners visualize com-
along without doing independent prehensive e x a mi n a t i o ns as
work." "broadly-construed essay exami-
A second comprehensive exami- nations that will give students an
nation will be required in the stu- opportunity to show the results
dent's field ofsconcentration by of both their formal course work
the end of his senior year. and their independent study."
House Bill Proposes To Give
'U' Budget of $45 Million

Hill Auditorium

Fi

ably not receive grades in intro-
ductory language courses. They
will simply have to pass a profi-
ciency examination some time be-
fore their junior year.
"By being able to take advan-
tage of techniques of individual
language training and not having
to worry about grades, all resi-
dential college students should ze
able to pass the language profi-
ciency exam with relatively little
trouble," Carduner says.
Flexibility will be maintained

(Continued from Page 1)
Montgomery said that the bill
to be reported out of the Senate
might contain some of the pro-
visions of his bill. He indicated
that Sen. Garland Lane, chairman
of the Senate Appropriations
Committee and himself were in
agreement on "how these Univer-
sities should be handled."
As one legislator put it, "This
bill shows the Legislature just
what they could do to the Univer-
sity if they ever wanted to."
Under the intricate and con-
fusing provisions, no funds are
appropriated for parts of the bud-
get where, in the view of the legis-
lature, the Universities did not

MAY NARD K LEINV Conduc/ing
ARTS CHORALE
MOZART ... Requiem
HAYDN ..."Lord Nelson" Mass
BRAHMS. .".Nachtwache"
FRIDAY 8:30

Admission Free

provide adequate breakdowns of
costs.
However, the final total of the
bill includes the figures. But a pro-
vision in the bill states that acti-
vities of a certain department shall
not exceed the amount of money
actually appropriated in the sub-
totals.
Thus, funds for the President's
office is appropriated "$0" in the
subtotals, but funds are included
in the final totals, thus explaining
the $65 million figure. The Office
of the President would actually be
appropriated no funds whatsoever.

GUILD HOUSE
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Just 25 min. from campus 872-4990
April 26th-May 8th
Paul BUTTERFIELD and his blues band
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Make your reservations NOW!
Now appearing thru April 24th
TOM PASLE plus PHIL MARCUS ESSER

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MOMMI

IN SIXTH YEAR:
Peace Corps Plans Further Expansion

WASHINGTON - (P) - "My
problem is that I'm 23 years oldd
andIve already had the experi-
en of a lifetime."
The Peace Corps, as it entersv
its sixth year, is in much the samet
situation as the Peace Corps Vol-
unteer who said this.
The volunteer had Just retur~ned2
from two years in a rural villaget
in Colombia feeling, that while hee
had helped make the world a lit-
tle better, he was about to em-
bark on an uncertain future. e
Soaring Success
Few federal programs have ex-t
perienced- the . soaring success ofa
the Peace- Corps, both abroad and
at home. But it, too, is now em-d
barking upon an uncertain future,
with a new leader.e
After supervising its creationt
and running the Peace Corps for
the first five years, Sargent Shriv-
er has stepped out to devote full
time to President Johnson's "war(
on poverty."
Except possibly for John F.
Kennedy, who proposed the Peace+
Corps during the 1960 campaign
} and created it five years ago with
an executive order, Shriver prob-r
aby was the main inspirational
force behind it.
New Leader
Thiswas the man Jack Hood
Vaughn has replaced at a time
wien the -Peace Corps is plan-t
ning: new training programs, new
o v e r s e a s programs, including
sending volunteers behind the Ir-
on Curtain into Eastern Europe,
and, a reverse Peace Corps which
could bring thousands of foreign1
youths to serve in this country.
Vaughn is aware of his problem.
In his. fitt speech as director, he
said-*,.,-,"hollowing' arge Shriver.
aro id the Peace Corps was brae-
ing. Following him as its leader is
a bit shattering."
While officials plan furtherex-
pansiloon, there are some signs the
Peace Corps may be reaching its
limits as far as numbers are con-
cerned, and will level off.
"Nation Building"
There is a new emphasis, which
Vaughn supports vigorously, on
trying for a maor impact in a
nation-"nation building is what
top officials call it.
And there is a continual fer-
ment among the volunteers, en-
couraged by Peace Corps leaders.
Possibly it is best typified by a
letter from a volunteer in Iran.
It said, in part:
"There is the distinct possibilityi
of a preoccupation with a 'senti-
mental mishmash of success anec-
dotes. Why? Because we are be-
ing enslaved by our dangerously
misleading public image. We are
trying to keep the. original glamor
untarnished, a glamor that never
really was, ironically, by demon-
strating expansion and success -
yet it is these two preoccupations
that may ruin us.
"Our American public . . . can
no longer be mesmerized by the
image of photogenic young dyna-
mos surrounded by smiling na-
tives. Likewise, we must abandon
that galling bit of naivete, the
idea of young men and women far
afield, erecting gleaming struc-
tures and passing on the torch of
knowledge to eager foreign popu-
lations. Most important, we must
be patient with the inconclusive
and intangible type of efforts that
volunteers are often engaged in.
"It is ironic that we who strove
so hard to win our acceptance by
selling an image are now becom-
ing its victims ..

Looking back on his Peace Corps
days, Shriver has said: "We prov-
ed that the common man can
play a role in foreign policy. This
was the biggest thing the Peace
Corps has done."
Reassure Americans
It was so greatly admired in this
area that 49 other nations now
have set up service organizations,
either for domestic or foreign
work, similar to the Peace Corps.
Also, Shriver said, "We reassur-
ed America about her own people.
You remember that in 1957-59
there were articles and books
about the softness of American
youth. People still remembered the
defections in Korea. We re-estab-
lished our faith in ourselves, prov-
ed Americans can measure up in
tough times, live under crude con-
ditions, that they are resourceful.
"There was a great deal of
complaining about our reacting to
communism, a feeling that we
ought to do something positive.
This was something positive."
Turn To Youth
Finally, Shriver said, the Peace
Corps turned the thoughts of
many American youths for the
first time to public service, teach-
ing, social service Jobs and for-
eign service.
Vaughn, his successor, is a
tough, 45-year-old veteran of the
foreign aid program and the Peace
Corps. "He is one of our own re-
turned," said one Peace Corps
staffer when the appointment was
announced.
Vaughn spent a decade with the
U.S. Information Agency-and the
foreign aid program, where, along
with his deputy Warren Wiggins,
he was ranked among the "Young
Turks" striving for less checkbook.
aid and more concentration on the
problems of people.,
Vaughn Steps In
As Peace Corps Latin-American
regional director, Vaughn develop-
ed most of the programs in that
area. In March 1964, after the
riots in Panama, President John-
son tapped him as U.S. ambassa-
dor to Panama.

Within 11 months, Johnson ele-
vated Vaughn to assistant secre-
tary of state for inter-American
affairs and coordinator of the Al-
liance for Progress. It was this job
he left to return to the Peace
Corps.
Vaughn has scheduled extensive
overseas traveling this spring to
visit the farflung Peace Corps op-
erations-something Shriver has-
n't been able to do the past two
years.,
"There is some doubt of my po-
licies," Vaughn said, in an inter-
view. "I need to reassure the vol-
unteers on my aims, my plans for
the Peace Corps."
See Increase
He took over an organization
with some 12,000 volunteers in 46
nations. Plans call for an increase
to 14,500 this summer and 16,000
in 1967.
Vaughn said five more nations
will be selected for Peace Corps
programs from nearly two dozen
applicants.
There-are some 6,000 returned
volunteers in the United States.
They are just beginning to have
an impact that will grow as the
alumni ranks swell to 50,000 by
1970 and. ,200,000 by 1980.
Impact at Home
Shriver has long contended that
the greatest impact of the Peace
Corps, in the long run, will be at
home.
But the first reaction of the re-
turned volunteer often is frustra-
tion. Wiggins puts it this way:

"They've been important people
in the lives of their villages. They-
ve caused change. Almost without
exception, they want a better,
more important job than they
have. Frustration is one way to
describe the attitude of the re-
turned volunteer, but just watch
him seven or eight years after he
gets back-when he has gotten
that important job he is looking
for."
Government Infiltration
Although most already are col-
lege graduates, 40 per cent of re-
turned volunteers go back to col-
lege, usually because their life
goal has changed and they need
to prepare for a new field. Anoth-
er 40 per cent enter some type of
service career.
Shriver's policy of "in, up and
out" for the Washington staff al-
ready ha sresulted in much gov-
ernment infiltration by the Peace
Corps. Ideally, this results in a
staffer moving up to a top Peace
Corps job, then out to a better
government job. Staffers who did-
n't measure up were eliminated.
As a result of Shriver's policy,
former'- Peace Corps staffers now
are ambassadors, U.S.I.A. officials,
Labor Department officials, and
hold down dozens of top jobs in
Washington.
Limit Stay
One former staffer, now work-
ing in an executive agency, boasts,
"I can call any agency and get a
job done without red tape, by con-

tacting a friend from the Peace
Corps."
Shriver insisted at its founding
that no staff member.ever should
make a career of the Peace Corps.'
At his urging, Congress created
Foreign Service status for staffers,
with a proviso that they can re-
main in the Peace Corps no longer
than five years.

Ending Friday
Shown at 1:00-3:00-5:00-
7:00 and 9:05
SHOOTER
the
COUMSA PICURC
DEAN MARTiN
in'"". as MATT HELM
CIII!I: f II0; : 11
9 IER AA II
costarring I .,"
STEEDASTEVENS
DALIAH LAVI
I6R B AURDACONE
ROBERJ WEBBER- JAM ES GREGORY~
ARE aE~~i[BVERLY ADAMS
CYD CHARISSE
SATURDAY

I

-the great showman

-his songs and music

FOLK MUSIC, BALLADS, BLUES

11

Ph. 483-4680
e&""n On.CARPENTER ROAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
- NOW SHOWING-
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MEiTROCO J
Shown at 7:30-11:20
Shown at 9:40 Only "'
PLUS
JOEY CHITWOOD'S Stunt Drivers
in "DON'T TAKE A CHANCE"
2 COLOR CARTOONS

Nominated for 5
Academy Awards!
PATCH

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DIAL The most touching
S 64 16 picture of the year!"
-N.Y.Posaj
"**** A.l
to be cherished!"
-N. Y. Daily New.
"Tremendous
emotional appeal!"
-N. Y. Heratd tribune
"Compelling
drama!"
┬źN.Y. Journal
American
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1ER- - ' WINTE'RS,.,

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Week

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SIDLE
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COMPANY PRODJUCTION
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tELIZAB E H HARTMAN

K

MOTHER'S GOES TO COLLEGE!
Exams are coming up and you can't concentrate
because you have never decided what the words to
Louie Louie are?-Then Mother's will help this
Thursday-IN PERSON
THE MEN
MOTHER'S- Tickets on Sole:
203 E. Ann Discount Records
8:30 Todd's Gentry Shop

PART TIME SUMMER WORK
IN MICHIGAN
DAYS, EVENINGS, SATURDAYS
For Graduate Students, UppereIassmien in
SOCIAL SCIENCES and RELATED FIELDS
A survey research project is scheduled for this sum-
mer which includes interviewing of low-income
families. It is sponsored by a research unit of The
University of Michigan.
Needed are persons who will be living at home in
the southern half of the Lower Peninsula (excluding
Wayne, Oakland and Washtenaw counties) during
late May and June.
Also needed will be persons living at home in the Up-
per and the northern half of the Lower Peninsula in
July and August.
Call 764-5459 for further information

I

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mlmmmmm

Ann Arbor Branch

AMERICAN CIVIL
LIBERTIES UNION

PRESENTS:

TH EATRE CO.
CONCEPT EAST

HAROLD PINTER'S
"THE CARETAKER"
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

-thinq
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s~ng it"i
MERO-BOLD WYN-MAYER
NERICAR
A"AES MOORE
KATHARIN

FUN7
4.
R ....A JOHN BEK PRODUCMIN
!DO MONIALBAN
HEAD- CHAD EVERET
ROSS - ED SULLI VAN
*J ST STR as HlimsRel
nnrrn"I" n' Anfnnki

FRI., SAT., SUN.-APR IL 22,23, 24

TICKETS:

$4.10, 3.30, 2.20, 1.75

BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP
NO 3-5624 OR 764-1801

211 S. STATE

CINEMA II
ielebrates

1f

I

In conjunction with the American Studies Student Association
THE CINEMA GUILD Presents
A 3-DAY BOGART BONANZA!!
Exams got you down? JOIN BOGEY and be mellow!

I

THE END OF CLASSES
with
FRANCE'S GREATEST
CRIME THRILLER
by the Director of
Kirx '.. .. Ii'I Ukj %A

:7
Z"ll
j
.1M1
E1
E

* Monday, April 18th "CROSS PACIFIC"
BOGEY, the reluctant spy with Sydney Greenstreet
and Mary Astor-directed by John Huston.
0 Tuesday, April 19th "THE BIG SLEEP"

-4

.... ....: :..:: ',.r

Kil

A

i

II

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