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April 12, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-12

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TU)

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

...._

University Symphony Orchestra Presents
Music Composed by Students and Faculty

Michiganensian '66:
Focus on Individual

IWIMM I ila

DIAL
8-6416

ESDAY, APRIL 12, 196*
The most touching
picture of the year?"I
- N. Y. Post

4

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
It's good for young composers to
be able to air their musical
thoughts. It's also good for the
musical community to hear what
these composers have to say.
Justas scientists are continual-
ly giving us new insights into the
real world, so, too, do composers
share their new ideas about the
aural esthetic. It is the composer's
job to resist stagnation and to
prevent a rehash of musical his-
tory in sound and it is the task of
the interested audience to bring
an open mind to concerts to as-

sess the value of what is fresh
from the composing stand.
Tonight at 8:30 p.m. in Hill
Aud. the University Symphony
Orchestra, Theo Alcantarilla and
John Farrer III, conductors, will
perform new music for orchestra
by Music School students and
staff.
Composer Robert Morris wrote
that his music "Syzygy" was con-
ceived "as a conjunction of 111
sections or groups, occasionally in-
terspersed with silence. Composi-
tion involved the relative statisti-
cal and polyphonic density, harm-
onic and tonal centers (or lack

thereof), dynamic intensity, and
distinctness of each group so to
form a shape that moves from a
diversity of sound and texture to
unity of direction and closure. Al-
though the music was organized
on such criteria, there is no 12-
tone or other kind of series in the
work. In the last analysis the ear
was the only guide."
Loris Z. Tjeknavorian's "Sket-
ches for Ballet" utilizes indiginous
Armenian and Persian folk sourc-
es which the composer himself
collected and which he used in a
very contemporary way. These
short, very compressed, and trans-

Concert Pianist, Instructor Sandor
Opposed to, Specialization in Music

By LINNEA HENDRICKSON
Gyorgy Sandor does not consid-
er himself a specialist although his
name is often associataed with
those of Bartok and Kodaly. San-
dor, who is known throughout the
world as a concert pianist, is the
director of the doctoral program
in piano performance at the music
school.
In an hour's conversation in
Sandoro's carpeted music school
studio containing two grand pi-
anos, the talk ranged from the
piano performance program, to
the differences between types of
music, to Sandor's travels, and to
more music.
In talking about the practice of
classifying musicians by their spe-
cialties, Sandor had some definite
ideas. "Although a performer may
be associated in the mind of the
public with being an expert on one
composer, it is hardly ever so in
reality." Sandor explains the clas-
sification as a means for critics
and the public to organize the per-
formersr in their own minds and
remember them. "Often perform-
ers are classified because they are
not known enough."
No Favorites
Sandor maintains he has no fa-
vorite composers. He may have
favorite compositions for certain
moods. "All the great composers
have written music for every
mood. As one's mood changes, cer-
tain compositions appeal more
than others, and then one may
grow tired of them. A great musi-
cian must be able to play every
type of music, just as a great ac-
tor must be able to play any role."
"Performers are usually classi-
fied with certain composers be-
cause - of their national back-
grounds; A Brahms symphony as
conducted by Toscanini in an Ital-
ian style, will be different from
Brahms performed by a German.
Musicians are supposed to inter-
pret their homeland's music better
than others. However, no one way
or interpretation is better than
any other.
"In listening to new music and
different interpretations of music,
one's immediate response might
not be the right one. We cannot
respond emotionally to something
that is entirely new. Only famil-
iarity with the music material
brings obvious emotional respon-
ses.
Abstract and Jazz
"All music ought to be judged
by the highest international stan-
dards." With classical music, San-
dor stressed, one must have a cer-
tain degree of familiarity to enjoy
it. The chief difference between
classical, or abstract music, and
folk music or jazz, is that with the
latter the response is immediatie.
"A piece of classical music which
sounds good at first may not be
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quite so good. The opposite is
true of popular music. If we im-
mediately respond to a new work
of abstract music, it may be be-
cause it's idiom is too much like
something we have heard before.
A really great piece of abstract
music we must listen to several
times to assimilate its style, be-
fore we get an emotional response,
and then we may like it more and
more. With a popular tune the ef-
fect is the opposite. We immedi-
ately love it, and after hearing it
several times grow tired of it.
"Time is really the best judge in
evaluating the quality of music,
both classical and popular. Only
the best of folk music, for instance,
has survived over many years in
all countries.
Sandor spends part of his time
teaching approximately seven stu-
dents who are the participants in
his doctoral program in piano per-
formance.
Sandor stresses that teaching
and performing are not separate
things. The program is geared to
high performance standards which
will also benefit the students in
their contact with a performer.
Degrees Necessary
By now a doctoral degree is
usually necessary for a position in
teaching music. It helps the tal-
ented young musician to break
into the field as a concert musi-
cian when he combines teaching
with playing.
"Music never had it so good as
today," Sandor says, and cited the
growth of new music programs
and schools all over the country.
He finds a position such as his
ideal, because he likes living in
Ann Arbor, and does not have to
spend all his time traveling.
Sandor was born in Budapest,
Hungary, where he studied piano
with Bela Bartok and composition
with Zoltan Kodaly. He came to
the United States in the 1930's,

making his American debut at
Carnegie Hall in 1939. In 1946, he
gave the world premier of Bartok's
"Third Piano Concerto" with the
Philadelphia Orchestra.
World Traveler
He has traveled all over the
world, playing concerts in Africa,
Australia and South America as
well as in Europe and Asia. Early'
this summer he will be engaged in
a recording project in New York,
and next year will tour Europe and
the United States.
Sandor's next Ann Arbor ap-
pearance will be at this year's May
Festival in a program where he
will play Bartok's "Concerto No.
1 for Piano and Orchestra" with
Ormandy and the Philadelphia
Orchestra.
"It's much easier to talk about
music than make music," Sandor
said during the course of the
conversation. But at the end, he
said, "Didn't we get too involved
in so many subject of music? May-
be it is, after all, easier to make
music than talk about it."

parent sketches contain contrast-
ing compositional te ch niques
which achieve a unique combina-
tion of sounds. Many think that
"Sketches" is a mile stone in the
evolution of a personal style for
its composer.
Jack Fortner's "Burleske for
Two Chamber Orchestras" is a 14
minute composition folded in half,
said its composer. Fortner employ-
ed two orchestras of contrasting
timbral possibilities. "Seven Move-
ments" by Daniel Perlongo is a
series of short pieces, each of
which defines a specific musical
event. Barry Vercoe 's "Five Pieces
for Chamber Orchestra" is in an
arch foorm, with the central
movement containing the gravita-
tional center. The movements in-
crease in length, tension, .and pol-
yphonic complexity as they ap-
proach this keystone, and decrease
in those qualities as they depart
from it.
About his music, Richard Toen-
sing wrote: "In this work I have
attempted to move beyond the
tonal worold circumscribed by the
tempered scale by writing what is
for me a new kind of melody con-
sisting of a number of fixed points
connected by portamentos of vary-
ing lengths and speeds. The form-
al plan of the work derives from
the juxtaposition of the melody
with sections of free rhythmic,
non-melodic activity improvised
by the players. The all-inclusive-
ness of pitch and rhythm suggest-
ed an analogy to me with the all-
inclusiveness found in the Com-
munity of Saints; this plus the
fact that the composition was
completed on All Saints' Day, 19-
65, led me to title the work "Hymn
for All Saints'. It was written for
the University String Orchestra
and is dedicated to John Farrer,
its conductoor."
Admission to this concert is
free.

By JOYCE WINSLOW
Michiganensian '66 focuses up-
on the individual University stu-
dent and proves e e cummings'
thought: "There's nothing as
something as one." The individual
is seen not as a face in a crowd,
but as the symbol for the crowd.
Student Government Council is
symbolized by a member reading
"Moderator" over lunch. The Daily
is symbolized by a managing edi-
tor reading mail.
In some pictures, the people
themselves are represented by
symbols. Dorm living is shown by
a long corridor sprouting opened
umbrellas. Married housing is
symbolized by a vestibule contain-
ing his boots, her boots, and a
milk bottle holding a rolled up
note.
None of the pictures in the
yearbook are captioned. One re-
ceives the impression while leaf-
ing through the book, of being led
on a silent journey through a
glossy black and white jungle.
Everyone in the pictures seems
to be laughing, singing, speaking,
or otherwise doing, but none of
their words appear on the page.
In one way this represents a
challenge for photography which
has been well met. A picture does
not really speak for itself. It
merely mimics the carefully chos-
en words of its photographer. The
pictures in this year's Ensian re-
flect a great deal of photographic
skill and creativity.
Besides the elimination of cap-
tions and a totally new concept

ENDS TONIGHT
III 0 0

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L..""

in design layout, the yearbook has
many other innovations. It fea-
tures special type and a different
kind of paper on its introductory
pages. It wears a new natural
buckram cover in lieu of the tra-
ditional leather one. And the
yearbook itself is divided into two
parts, eliminating the need to is-
sue a supplement later in the year.
Michiganensian '66 is a quiet,
sophisticated, lovely book.
NINE

WEDNSQA

ENDING FRIDAY
SHOWN TODAY AT
AND 9:05
MATT HELM SHOOTS THE WORKS!
BIGG'EST.
NOISIEST,
.." NAUGHTIEST
CONTENDER
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DEAN
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EASPINSTIAR IA TBUDNOAYRINN[DBER[B
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STARTS SATURDAY

Nominated for 5
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03 BLUIE

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starring
SIDNEY SHELLEY
POlIER adWINTERS
also rI7 I'
starring ELILZABETH HARTMAN

"****Afilm
to be cherished!"
- N.Y. 1)(21V NPII
"Tremendous
emotional appeal!"
-N.Y. Herald Tribune
"Compelling
drama !"
r-N.V. eJournal
An rimcn

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4AJ'IAIIL, by the song
te-nwn s Dominique"

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But you can still get great seats to
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or Sunday night (7:00) . . . $1.75
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Box office (NO 8-6300) now open!
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Notice to
Advertisers'
in

Mr. Hayward, an expert on current Soviet affairs, is the author of numer-
ous articles and the contributina editor of several books on Soviet Russian lit-

M f/YOUJR \N .Stunning sucicess of the 1963 season.-

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