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April 10, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 1966

~P~E TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. APRIL 10, 1966

- - _

STUDENT LABS:
Theater.
By ANN L. MARCH10
"The Student Lab Theatre pre-
sents excerpts from Pushkin's 'Eu-
gene Oneigin' at 4:10 p.m. Free
admission." Posted sparingly in the
Frieze' Bldg. throughout the se-
niester are signs like these, offer-
ing to students 'who see the pro-
ductions the experience of theatre-
in-practice.
As the name implies, the Stu-
dent Lab Theatre is not organized
solely or even primarily for aud-
lece reaction. William R. Mc-
Graw, head of the lab theatre, de-
scribes its purpose as three-fold.
The basic function of the theatre
is to - provide an opportunity for
student directors and designers to
execute their work for public per-
formance.
In the process of directing and
designing, two more objectives pre-
sent themselves. As a second goal
the lab threatre offers students
an opportunity to act, especially
less experienced ones who would
normally restrict their perform-
ances to classroom scenes.
The third objective is to provide
a production situation for plays
which may not be used in major
productions (i.e. audience oriented
productions). Because ofthis, the
theatre takes on an experimental
aura, often as entertaining as the
play itself.
The selection of the play to be
presented is usually the choice of
the ,student. director with staff
assistance. Directors are chosen.
from three directing courses. One
is an intermediate .directing course
covering a wide variety of plays.'
The second, which is not offered
as frequently, limits its study
to' contemporary experimentalist
playwrights. The third studies
plays from the various historical
periods.
Twice a Year

Experience Offered

ONCE Production;
Humorous, Boring

'U' CENTER IN NEED:
Asian Expert Shortage Seen

sented. This semester's plays in-
cluded Richard Reichman's "Jour-
ney to Quadangh" and ' Steven
Coffman's "The Squirrel That
Jumped Over the Stump."
The Arena Theatre, located on
the first floor of the Frieze Bldg.,
stages most of the non-admission
plays. Although many people feel
that the close proximity of the
audience upsets the aesthetic dis-
tance-empathy relationship, Mc-
Graw feels that the theatre is not
a major handicap.-
He asserts that the theatre is
flexible enough to produce adap-
tations of most of the important
plays and can be used as a round,
two or three-sided or corner stage.
However, he admits that the plays
that do well are those which do
not depend on elaborate vertical
scenery.
The advantage of the theatre is
the intimacy gained by the feeling
of audience participation in ritual
that does not exist when a pros-
cenium stage is used.
Experimental research in the
area of the arts has only recently
become a legitimate discipline.
This ° ipcludes the study of aud-
ience measurement in various
media. Studying audience reaction
by using different styles. of pro-
duction or approaches to study
helps evaluate the efficacy or ed-
ucational value of these- methods.
Although these studies have al-
ready been applied to radio and
television audiences, only very re-
cently have universities begun to
study theatre audiences.
The funds for the lab threatre
come from the theatre's budget,
which, for the most part, is self-
sustaining from sales during the
major season. The theatre is
limited by this budget and could
readily use government or private
grants for its students.
Yet the current record of pro-
duction is impressive. This year
the lab theatre will have presented

14 plays. Beginning this year the
theatre plans to extend into the
3A half term, which will enable
even more students to take part
in the productions.
Of course, the designing and
directing aspect is necessarily lim-
ited to students in those classes.
However, the acting is open to
anyone interested..
Next Thursday there will be a
public performance given by the
lab theatre of the rarely perform-
ed opera, "The Music Master,"
which was composed in the eight-
eenth century by Giovanni Bat-
tista Pergolesi. It was first per-
formed as a comic intermezzo be-
tween the acts of a sacred drama,
"La Conversions di S. Guglielmo
d'Aquitania," probably by fellow
pupils at the monastery of St.
Agnello Maggiore.
The director of the opera is
Michael Robbins, who is seeking
his master's degree in theatre and
who has had a strong background
in music.

By BETSY COHN
There is no order and continuity
in something when it is "happen-
ing" nor is there a single theme
that can define an evening spent
watching a performance of the
ONCE group (members of the
Dramatic Arts Center).
"Orange Dessert" began last
night's presentation as two seated
ladies came into view on a large
darkened stage. They were in-
structed by a sourceless voice
(whose voice and breath were ar-
ticulated clearly in the micro-
phone) instructing them on their
seating, leg movements and walk-
ing. The two ladies, strut around
the stage gracelessly until the
vaporish narrator can no longer
tolerate giving them instruction.
Their antics subside and the stage
is then dominated by an elliptical
film segment of the peeling, sec-
tioning, and burning of an orange.
The next bit of action, "Soft
Centers," focuses on the maize

Industry Unable To Fill
Available Job Positions

and conflicting domains of the rat
race. The maize is carefully chor-
eographed by two dusty looking
gentlemen who place adhesive
tape on the stage floor. The two
gentlemen, w i t h corresponding
ladies, work within the restricted
area, stripping, zipping and slip-
ping precisionally from one sym-
bolic aspect of life to another. The
background accompaniment is
sounds of travel and a tired sta-
catto voice counting breathlessly
to 2850. If "happenings" have an
art, perhaps this meticulously cal-
culated episode had it.
From precision to a more relax-
ed chaos, "Lectures," a series of
two part theatre events which pro-
vided a voice sound environment
for actions from various fields of
sports. Irony seemed the obvious
focus of these events which includ-
ed a soft toned reading of the
dogeared pages from a "Fanny
Hill" novel while two healthy
sportsmen virilely fling Kleenex at
one another across a ping pong
table. Humor appears unexpec-
tantly sometimes, and for some
reason, it did in this scene.
The climax of the evening came
after the anticipating audience
was handed intriguing looking
sheets with lines, numbers and
arrows. The audience folded while
the speaker moderated in mathe-
matical and scientific terms. The
audience remained intent on bend-
ing and folding while a blindfolded
lady in a black laced net teeters
precariously on elevated planks
and other forms of animated acro-
batics occurred in the background.
This was a spoof on aviation, a
spoof on pseudo scientific lingo
and explanation, and a spoof on
the audience which seemed so en-
grossed with their folding activi-
ties that they missed most of the
action on stage. The result was
paper airplanes which were di-
rectly propelled to the darkening
stage.
There is comedy in seeing people
exposed in their most undignified
manners, and.there is humor in
absurdity. Yet there is boredom in
repitition lack of spontaneity, and
in chaotic elements which mock
the stabiilty of a unifying theme.
Humor and boredom: the ONCE
group had both.

(Continued from Page 1)
"There are few universities that
,an make this kind of commit-
ment," said Gosling. "Large re-
sources and great imagination are
necessary."
The center does not actually of-
fer a degree program as such, and
has no plansto institute such a
program in the future, said Ness.
The 29 "associates of the center"
as he calls them, teach courses in
a wide range of established dis-
ciplinary departments including
natural resources, social sciences
and music. There is no department
of South and Southeast Asian
studies and no students directly
involved with the center.
Viet Nam is not one of the
areas in which the University cen-
ter specializes, a fact explained by
lack of people knowledgable in the
field, said Gosling. It does spe-
cialize in Maylasia, the Philippines
and Thailand and has programs
in India and Pakistan.
Because of the Iac1K of Viet
Nam experts here, the national
program previously run by the
University that sends American
students to Saigon to study is
being undertaken by the Univer-
sity of Washington. At present,
there are five students in Viet
Nam.
Since its founding five years
ago, the center has been built up
under the direction of first Rich-
ard Park and then Gosling and
through Ford Foundation assis-
tants. Last year, the center became
-a National Defense Education Act
Center meaning that the Office
of Education will pay one half of
all materials and costs added after
the base year (1964-1965).

paying $35,000 in matching funds.
Said Gosling, "The idea behind
this is to help the area centers
train more people."
Another aid given to students
through the center are the Na-
tional Defense Foreign Language
fellowships. Last year, the center
received 32 applicants, half com-
ing from peace corps returnees
whose interest developed while
overseas. In comparison, 64 stu-
dents applied for aid in the area
of Chinese studies all directly
from undergraduate s c h o o I s.
"These figures are more evidepce,"'
said Ness, "of the lack of academic
training in the South and South-
east Asian area."
Ness numbers the courses now
being offered in the area "between
15 and 20 excluding language and'
literature courses," but this fig-
ure varies from year to year. The
emphasis on the type of courses
I-

ten years from languages and
literature to the social sciences.
The empahsis, he said, is not
I on the area itself, but on the skills
of the student's discipline as ap-
plied to the area. Departments
offering instruction leading to ad-
vanced degrees with opportunity
to specialize in this area are: an-
thropology, economics, Far East-
ern languages and literatures, geo-
graphy, history, history of art,
linguistics, political science and
sociology.
Enrollment in this field has
grown from 54 undergraduates and
81 graduates in 1960-1961 to 250
undergraduates, 300 graduates at
present. Anticipated enrollment is
a rise to 350 undergraduates, 500
graduates by 1968-1969. The num-
ber of masters degrees conferred
has dropped but is expected to
rise; the number of doctorates has
increased and is anticipated to
keep increasing.

*1,

This year the government is I offered has shifted in the past

DIAL
8-6416

Academy Award Nominee

4

(Continued from Page 1)
fered salaries higher than their
abilities warrant. Often graduates
have the advantage in bargain-
ing with potential employers for
starting salaries.
A survey of 110 schools by the
College Placement council, shows
starting salary offers to seniors
with technical degrees are aver-
aging $663 a month, up 4.4 per-
cent from the end of the 1965 re-
cruiting period. Offers to students
with non-technical degrees are
averaging $564, a 6 percent in-
crease. The range is from $545 for
humanities and social science ma-

i

jors to $677 for chemical engi-
neers.
Short Period Hiring
According to Miss Mildred D.
Webber of the University's Place-
ment Services, many companies
are willing to hire graduate men
for as little as one month. The
man who works for a short period
and is then either drafted or en-
lists, can take a leave of absence,
maintain his position in line of
superiority, receive all increases
in pay, and have a job' awaiting
him after two or three years of
miltary service.
Other places which Miss Web-
ber recommends students with
masters degrees to investigate are
junior and community colleges.
Instructors at junior colleges
are not required to have a teach-
ing certificate. The job is ideal
for the person who wants to work
full-time before going on to get
his doctorate, or part-time while
continuing to go to school.'

"ONE OF
THE YEAR'S
10 BEST!

Twice during the year scripts
selected by the English department 1
from playwriting courses are pre-

Viet Catholics Denounce Anti-Ky Riotings,
flut Call for Representative Government

(Continued from Page 1)
boats andn . Marine helicopters'
handled the exodus.
The crystalization of Buddhist
hierarchal opinion was disclosed
after: Ky appointed a new com-
mander for -the 1st Corps area,
in an apparent attempt to reas-
sert his -government's authority
against the challenge of dissident
elements in that area-South Viet
Nani's five northern provinces.
The new commander is Maj.
Gen. Ton That Dinh, 39, who has
served since 1964 as inspector gen-
eral of the Vietnamese joint gen-
eral staff in Saigon. Nominally
listed as a Roman Catholic, he was
among the officers who took part
in the overthrow of Diem, a Cath-
olic. He -was born in Hue, a center
of the northern agitation.
Dinh flew to Da Nang to suc-
ceed -Maj" Gen..Nguyen Van Chu-
an, whom-the junta appointed last
month only to --find he shared.
-some of .the sympathies of the dis-
sidents. Chuan had succeeded Lt.
Gen. Nguyen Chanh Thi, regard-
ed -as a potential political rival of
Ky, who was dismissed March 10.
Vietnamese Roman Catholic stu-
dents, in an Easter Sunday meet-
ing, denounced antigovernment
violence, but called for a represen-
tative government "as soon as
possible" and declared Viet Nam's
sovereignty must be respected.
The , theme of representative
government and the respect of na-
tional sovereignty is the same as
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that sounded by the country's
powerful Buddhists in a series of
m e e t i n g s and demonstrations
throughout the past month.
It had been expected that the
meeting of the Catholic students
would be critical of the violence
that has broken out, but their open
stand on the other two issues had
not been anticipated.
Earlier indications had been that
the Easter meeting would be de-
voted to outlining a position
against recent violent demonstra-
tions.;
Sunday's meeting was sponsored
by the Saigon University Catholic
student's organization, and speak-
ers represented several schools
within the university.
The meeting was held ink an
800-seat public hall next door to
the British Embassy and . about
two blocks from the Saigon Basil-
ica, the main center of Catholic
worship in the city. Thirty minutes
-after. the meeting. began, only
about half the seats in the hall
had been filled.
Banners printed in English and
displayed outside the building
said: "Democracy is Not Anarchy.
Just Cause Exists Only When Na-
tional Sovereignty Exists."
Even the most inaccessible
business doors open quickly
when you can -offer a college
education plus practical
secretarial skills.
In the upper echelons you may
find that being an executive
assistant is your forte-or you may
work up to becoming an executive
yourself. Others have done it.
Gibbs graduates have done it-
women who have the
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Gibbs offers a Special Course
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Similar banners were hung in-
side the auditorium, together with
one behind the speakers' stand
that said: "Friends of the Free
World Help Us in Our Struggle
Against Red China."
In a printed manifesto the stu-
dent organization declared: "The
primordial condition of stabiliza-
tion in this present state of crisis
and of victory over communism
is the creation of a government
really representing the people.
"National sovereignty must be
respected, de jure and de factor,
to justify the true national cause."
The manfesto added that the
people have a right to struggle for
a life of freedom, democracy, peace
and decency.
"The p r e s e n t administration
must establish as soon as possible
a democratic regime and turn over
power to the people's true repre-
sentatives in an orderly and re-
sponsible manner. ,
"We are indebted to the allied
forces for their participation in
our strugglefor freedom. But we
demand that they respect the
Vietnamese people's self-determi-
nation and sovereignty,
If you have not seen
Psycho, you're really
missing something.
If you have,
see it again..
H ITCHCOCK'S
PSYCHO
with
TONY PERKINS
last performance
TONIGHT
7 and 9 P.M.

The most touching
picture of the year!"
-N.Y.Pos
"* * A film
to be cherished!"
-N. Y. Daily News

program schedule
THE
NEW YORK
PHILHARMONIC
ORCHE STRA
Tune in the Philharmonic each Sunday at 2:00 p.m.,
(WUOM-FM, 91.7 on your dial), brought to you through
special arrangements between the University of Mich-
igan, Ann Arbor Federal and the Liberty Music Shop.
The current program schedule is:
Sunday, April 10
FOSS, Conducting; KUCHTA and THOMAS, Soloists
Beethoven: Military Marches for Winds, Grosse Fuge for
Strings; Kilar: Riff 62; Wagner: Final Scene, "Siegried"
Sunday, April 17
FOSS, Conducting
Robert, Gaby and Jean Casadesus, Pianists
Berlioz: Roman Carnival Ov.; Messiaen: Chronochromie;
Casadesus: Con. for Three Pianos; Milhaud: In Memory of
J. F. Kennedy, Symphony No. 10; Debussy: Two Nocturnes
ANN ARBOR FEDERAL SAVINGS
and LIBERTY MUSIC SHOP

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ANNOUNCING
TWO (2) OPENINGS
for
STUDENT MEMBERSHIP
on the
Board of Governors for Religious Affairs
at the University of Michigan
(This Board is composed of students, faculty, staff and alumni
of the University of Michigan who meet monthly for a
dinner-meeting at the Union to discuss and advise on matters
pertaining to the area of religion at the University: curricular
offerings, counseling opportunities, the educational and per-
sonnel services of The Office of Religious Affairs, campus
and community religious bodies in relation to the University,
etc.)
Such an advisory board needs people interested in
this vast area; particularly does it need students
who can contribute knowledge and understanding
about student concerns, needs, hopes, ideas, etc.

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JOAN
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NEW FRONTIERS in an ANCIENT LAND
A Young and Vibrant Land NEEDS Young and Vibrant People
waits for you
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