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April 09, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-09

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PAGE..TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRIL 59,1966

PA%~ TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

*daa 4 A~1RVYSa 1 aaa aLaU ~ 1~V V

A

Text of 1901 Interview at 'U'
Gives New View of Churchill

FILMS
Poitier Warms Hearts,
Elevates Quality of Fil

'WHERE BOYS ARE':
Girls Take Stab at Ivy Men

of

m

"I think we shall have to take
the Chinese in hand and regulate
them. The Aryan stock is bound
to triumph."
. It was Winston Churchill speak-
ing, 65 years ago, as a young man
of 27.
The 1901 scene was Churchill's
room at a local hotel. He had just
made a; speech to students of the
University who booed and hissed
him when he mentioned British
successes in the Boer War in South
Africa.
Churchill's interviewer-it was
over a bottle with two glasses and
it lasted far into the night-was
Gustavus Ohlinger, a reporter for
the student magazine.
Promise Made
Churchill agreed to talk freely
to Ohlinrger, but made: him prom-
ise not to publish anything that'
would reflect on his parliamentary
career. Ohlinger, who became a
distinguished Toledo, Ohio lawyer,

After saying China would have
to be regulated, Churchill said "I
believe that as civilized nations
become more powerful they will
get more ruthless, and the time
will come when the world will im-
patiently bear the existence of
great barbaric nations who may at
any time arm themselves and
menace civilized nations.
"I believe in the ultimate par-
tition of China-I mean ultimate.
I hope we shall not have to do
it in our day. The Aryan stock is
bound to triumph.
"Personally, I am not greatly
concerned about Russian develop-
ment in China. Russia has a jus-
tifiable ambition to possess a
warm-water port. It is really em-
barrassing to think that 100 mil-
lion people are without one."
Other Churchillisms reported by
Ohlinger:
-"In, England, the newspapers
has great power; you cannot say
that here ... You have no national
paper . . . To overcome the dif-
ficulty you must call in the aid
of the telegraph. There should be
centers in different sections of the
country where., the national paper
could be published for the sec-
tion."-
Advice Given
-"You ask my advice to the
young correspondent? It is: ver-
ify ,our quotations and avoid
split infinitives .r.
+"I think ;the press affords.

the ladder which is available to
everyone in a way afforded by
no other profession; put out good
stuff and in time people will say,.
'We must have this'."
-"It is well that a number of
men should be exposed to the ups!
and downs of life, that they should
be compelled to cudgel their brains
and fight for their existence as
independent producers. That is the'
factory where the national fibre
is made."
Conclusion
Ohlinger concludes his inter-
view: "It was now four o'clock in
the morning-one bottle was empty
-and I was reminded that I had
an eight o'clock class.
"I bade farewell to my host,
never dreaming that the handsome
young man who had been so gen-
erous of his time and information
was destined to carry upon his
shoulders the fate of nations and
tie happiness of millions yet un-
born."
So ends an odd footnote to
history.

By LLOYD GRAFF
Sidney Poitier has a predilection
for the Book of Matthew.
Two years ago he won the Oscar
for best actor of the year in "Lilies
of the Field," a simple but inspir-
ing film. The title came from a
line in Matthew, "Consider the
lilies of the field, how they grow;
they toil not, neither do they
spin.'
The gifted Poitier now stars in
a delicate affecting movie of sim-
ilar simplicity and alluring nai-
vite, "A Patch of Blue." It, too,
builds upon an enduring line from
Matthew. "Neither cast ye pearls
before swine."
This is a sweet movie, a kind
movie, a soft movie, a bit sugary,
sometimes saccharine, occasionally
implausible, but on the whole
awfully nice.
The plot can be outlined on the
head of a pin. Blind girl, daugh-
ter of a revolting slut, finds in-
nocent joy in the companionship of
a gentle Negro. The bigoted whore

t now he has outlasted the
British statesman and World
II leader, and today Ohlinger
shed that long-suppressed
view in the Michigan Quar-
Review. He said he wrote it
diately after the intervew in
e young Churchill comes
igh clearly as an ardent sup-
r of the British Em ire. Some.
s ideas at the time seem a bit,

Adminuistrators Fae Task
Of Recruiting Professors.

is scandalized at the daughter
meeting a "nigger," "a black
buck," but the gentle Gordon
(Poitier) plucks the girl from the
clutches of evil and shows her the
first love of her contorted, pulp
book life.
It sounds corny, I guess it is
corny, but a Poitier has the basic
radiant saintliness to prevent it
from becoming cheap, "Edge of
Night," trash. His love of blind
Silena is steadfastly platonic.
While she longs for his body, he
ministers to her soul. Silena's
bitchy mother is incapable of un-
derstanding such emotion, much
less feel it herself. Her big pro-
ject is to go into partnership on
a brothel with her co-whore Sadie.
Shelly Winters plays the fat,
belly spreading prostitute mother,
Rosanne, with compelling nasti-
ness.'While she makes her a stere-
otype, the one-mit salaciousness
is effective. She portrays a woman
of utter worthlessness, the essence
of scum.
Elizabeth Hartman plays Silena
convincingly. Her blindness is not
as desperate and frenzied as
Patty Duke's in "The Miracle
Worker," but her fragile endur-
ance despite the cudgeling en-
vironment strikes the viewer.
Going back to the line from
Matthew about not casting pearls
before swine. It refers to wasting
wisdom on the world's vermin.
In. the opening scene Silena is
stringing beads-imitation pearls
-a demeaning, exploitive job for
the blind. Rosanne spills them,
then blames Silena for it and
makes her pick them up.
Silena later meets Gordon in
the park when she drops the beads
and he stoops to help her pick
them up.
The beads brought Silena and
Gordon together, but the meaning
of a fulfilling, joyful, love was
beyond the grasp of crass Rosanne.
Fitting in with this general
theme, Pearl was the name of the
only other friend Silena ever had.
Pearl, too, was Negro and Ros-
anne forbade Silena ever to see
her again when she learned of her
race.
The movie has many parallels
with "A Taste of Honey," and
even the title, "A Patch of Blue,"
sounds a similar cadence. In re-
finement the American movie may
be inferior, but Sidney Poitier has
a cinema warmth that melts the
most cynical viewer's iciness.

NEW YORK (/)-A college girl's
guide called' "Where The Boys
Are" unmasks the dating habits
of male collegiates, but from
Dartmouth to Rutgers the boys
aren't going along with the ap-
praisal.
In the words of one Princeton
junior, Bruce McConnell, 21, of
Pasadena, Calif., "if the young
ladies don't like us, they really
don't have to go out with us."
The 32-page book offering dat-
ing advice to college girls was
compiled by staffs of student news-
papers at Smith and Mt. Holyoke
Colleges for women.
Reply
Tartly written to plunge daggers
into the male ego, it is a reply
to a book published last year at
Princeton in which the boys had
their say about the girls. That
one was entitled "Where The
Girls Are."
"Where The Boys Are" wasn't
written by girls at all but by two
young Amherst College seniors,
Thomas G. Plate of Farmingdale,
N.Y., and J. Aaron Latham of
Tucson, Ariz.
"The boys provided the courage
and raised the money to get the
book published and we provided
the information," said Marsha
Cohen, 19, a Smith coed.
Defender Needed
Said Plate: "We felt the girls
needed a defender."
Latham said, "We met and list-
ened to them gab about the guys
they've dated-and then sat down
and wrote."
Here are some sample passages
from "Where The Boys Are" and
how they were greeted by the
men:
Princeton: "The only place in
the world where when a boy and

his date walk past a mirror, it'si
the boy who stops to comb his
hair."
Reaction: "A little more hair
combing might be in order for a
lot of schools around here, both
the male and female variety," said
Princetonian Frank Warren, 20, a
junior of Danville, Va,
Harvard: "Always remember
that if the Harvardman you're
dating is wearing a three-piece
suit as you walk into the Brattle
Theatre, he's wondering how you'll
look next to him at some diplo-
matic reception in 10 years."
Reaction: "They're oriented to-
ward finding husbands and they're
pleased to believe we're thinking
about what concerns them," re-
plied John Gerhart, a Harvard
senior from Abilene, Tex.
Columbia: "If you want to do
the junior sophisticate bit around
Morningside Ieights, the Colum-

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bia boy is not for you, but don't
take him for a pushover; anyone
who's had to fight his way into a
subway is tougher than any flimsy
Ivy."
Reaction: "At Columbia the
subways may be on strike, the
electricity may be off and the wa-
ter rationed, but after all, eight
million people live in this city.
We must be doing something
right," retorted Columbian Rob-
ert Merlis, 18, of Brooklyn.
Dartmouth: "The Dartmouth
man is a masochist. He's maroon-
ed in the wilds of New Hampshire
-so when another voice, yours
soft, charming, feminine, finally
arrives, the timber wolf is bound
to pounce."
Reaction: "The image of a Dart-
mouth man as a sex-hungry ani-
mal is inculcated in freshmen girls
and is not founded on fact. It is
what they want to believe."

Ar

. r t l t tttt t t

NEWS WIRE

ELIMINATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST of appointed
administrative officials of state agencies is required in a proposed
piece of legislation reported out of the state House Judiciary Com,-
mittee last week. Lansing sources indicate that the bill, sponsored
by.Rep. Jack Faxon (D-Detroit) has an excellent chance of pass-
ing. Present conflict of interest statutes are applicable primarily
to elected officials.
'..* * 3 -
CIVIL RIGHTS WAS THE PRIMARY CAUSE of college stu-
dent protests last year, a survey sent to 850 college and university.
deans showed yesterday. Campus food service was next on the
list of top student grievances.
The survey showed that only a tiny fraction of student bodies
protested on any single issue. Protest groups rarely exceeded
eight per cent of the student population, it said.
Protests on Jnited States policy in Viet Nam were reported
by only 21 per cent of the schools queried. The survey was con'-
ducted by the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, N.J.
THE DEAN OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE, Columbia niversity,
David B. Truman spoke recently at Rackham Amphitheatre on
"Survey Research in the Development of Political Science." His
speech was part of the dedication program for the Institute for
Social Research. He praised the recent trend in political science
surveys to move away from simple election prediction to more
abstract questions such as determining the effect of the new
scientific elite: on voters and candidates. Dean Truman compli-
iented the ISR for its effort to cover research topics that could
have a significant effect on candidates and political leaders.,
* * * *
PROF.3.J PHILIP WERNETTE of the Graduate School of
Business Administration, speaking at a meeting of the Detroit
Stock Exchange recently, commented that "business is at an all
time high, but the nation still worries."
Wernette, editor of the Michigan Business Review, said that
1966 will be the best year yet, predicting the gross national pro-
duct will be up as much as eight per cent from 1965, with the
commodity price level up only three per cent.
Still, he pointed out, people worry about Viet Nam, inflation,
the size of the- federal budget, and the length of the business
upsurge itself.
Wernette also predicted that, interrupted by short recessions
flke those, of 1949, 1953, 1957, and 1960, economic growth in the
U.S. will continue into the indefinite future. But, he said, national
growth will not guarantee increased sales of every product or
growth of every firm and bank. "At all times," he warned, "and
especially at times of momentary uncertainty, it is wise to plan
ahead for long-run growth and be prepared to take advantage
of it."
* * * *
THE- UNIVERSITY CHAPTER OF the Young Republican
club collected $400 in its bucket drive to adopt financially, through
the Foster Parents Plan Inc. children in South Viet Nam who
have been made homeless because of the war. The drive ran
fron Wednesday to Friday noon and was termed highly success-
fulI by the president of the club, Ralph Heikkenen, '66.

(Continued from Page 1)
an offer to him is requested of the
dean. If . the appointment is a
joint appointment with one of the
research centers on campus, or
with another school within the
.niversity, then it too must agree
to the appointment. If unanimous
agreement is obtained from all
concerned, the appointment is
made and undergoes processing
through the executive council of
the literary college, if it is a
literary c o 11 e g e appointment,
through the office of the Vice-
President of Academic Affairs and
to the Regents. At the end of this
process, the recruited professor is
ready to stride into the lecture
hall.
Junior Faculty
The end of each year brings
many applications for junior posi-
tions to each department. Prof.
H. R. Crane, chairman of the
physics department, said that the
large number of applicants for a
position in his department is due
to the former industrial policy
of "stock piling" many scientists
in order to obtain government
contracts. Because of this large
backlog, many students went into
teaching. Prof. -G. E. Hay, chair-
man of the math department, said
that this recent increase in appli-
cants is a result of the large num-
ber of students applying to many
universities, hoping to get a job.
from only one of them.
Despite this excess of applicants,
there is a national shortage of
post-Ph.D.'s which has resulted
in the increase of teaching fellows.
The rise in teaching fellows also
has been caused by an increase in
students concentrating in certain
departments. The teaching fellow
is never given full control of a
course, but is usually asked to
handle labs and recitations. In
this manner, the teaching fellow
is trained while earning his Ph.D.
and as a result will presumably
make a better professor.
In any process of recruitment
there are certain advantages and
disadvantages at the recruiter's
disposal. There is a natural prob-
lem in asking a man to "pull up
roots," but the biggest drawback
appears to be the attempt to re-
cruit able men in an area within
a department which is not strong.
"It is much easier to build on
strength that you already have,
Read
Daily
Classifieds

rather than strengthen a weak
area within the department," said
Prof. Samuel Eldersveld, chair-
man of the political science de-
partment.
Advantages Here
According to Hays, a few of the
University's advantages are the
following:
-The University is competitive
in regard to salaries;
-The research facilities are a
big advantage, and
- ,The quality of the students at
both the undergraduate and grad-
uate level is high.
This last advantage is seen by
Hays as one of the strongest be-
cause it attracts many professors
looking for a challenging teaching
experience.
The present quality of the teach-
ing staff is also abig advantage
in recruitment because it repre-
sents an intellectual community'
in which the candidate can work,
according to Eldersveld.
He claimed that the "free en-
vironment for scholarly activity'
and the quality of the personnel
is a fantastic advantage here."

POETRY
Jerry Badanes
Martha MacNeal Zweig
Larry Meyers
Harvey Shapiro

1111

MUSIC
Huron River Ramblers
Walt Blackwell
The Muirs
Willie Wells

Campus Theaters Face,
Effects of CO mpetition

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By BETSY COHN
There is a cinematic celluloid
circle reeling through the Univer-
sity called Cinema Guild. and.
Cinema II. Outside this student
studded circle flit the commercial
Butterfield theatres "at standard
prices."
One would think this sphere
would be sharp edged with com-
petition and conflicts. So far
though, "It is really to early to
know what effects we have had
on each other," according to Hugh
Cohen, manager of the Cinema
Guild.,
The two SGC approved organ-
izations do hold one thing in
common; they show a variety of
movies to students for less than
regular prices.
The aims of Cinema Guild are
to show "good" movies, foreign, art
and diversified films which have
not been shown in Ann Arbor
previously; or which should be
shown, for their own sake, again.
Cinema '!, on the other hand,
aims to fulfill "the need for more
recent movies at student prices as

an alternative to the standard
prices of the regular theatres."
While competition is a moot
point at present, there is question
whether or not the two Cinemas
will be able to work out a com-
promise on when to show their
movies so that the two organiza-
tions are not showing movies on
the same evening. "If this type
of arrangement cannot be worked
out, the only other alternative for
Cinema Guild, would be to raise
prices, and this would be un-
fortunate," said Cohen.
Both Cinemas are in the process
of planning: the Guild will be
running during the summer; their
programs will be for those who are
"too hot to become absorbed in
heavy drama." "Seven Brides for'
Seven Brothers," "The Yearling,"
"The Circus" (Chaplin), "Shane,"
"Sabrina" and "Bringing Up
Baby," are among some of the
forthcoming- light summer films.
For winter, Cinema Guild is plan-
ning new screens and projectors.
Cinema II does not plan to pro-
ject during the summer but hopes
to return in cinemascope in the
fall.

ParcH
of ISLUIE

The most touching
picture of the yeat!"
-N.Y;Post
****Afilm
to be cherished!"
-N.Y. Daily News
"Tremendous
emotional appeal!"
-N. Y. Herald Tribune
"Compelling
drama!"
N.Y. Journal
American

i

starring.
SIDNEY SHELLEY
P0/TIER atWINTERS
string ELIZABETH HARTMAN,

w

HELD
OVER ::.

2nd
BIG
WEEK
, YZ y

._

r ' I
Ir
TONIGHT at 7and 9 a;
VITTORIO DE SETA'S
r '
THE BANDITS
r- R
ORGOSOLO
r (Italy-1961)
"A modern parable told with great sim-
plicity and acted entirely by shepherds
and peasants of Orgosolo, a wild, deso-
late and perilous region in the rugged
mountains of Sardinia."
r

THE ONCE GROUP PRESENTS
A BENEFIT PERFORMANCE FOR A WORLD TOUR
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one huge program of premieres
ORANGE DESSERT * SOFT CENTERS
9 LECTURES 0 KITT"(HAWKI

THE

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MATT HELM fights with crooks.
MATT HELM tang/es with strippers.
MATT HELM s with the action in his
first film adventure!

SATURDAY, APRIL 9

8:30 P.M.'

The
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601 West Stadium Blvd.

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COLUMBIA PICTURES pesen*s
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