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April 06, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 1966

THE MICIGAN DIAILY

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PAGE- SVI1

'

insights and insults
CHUCK "VETZNER

Oddsmakers Pick Tigers, Reds

Thoughts I got while taking a shower OR stream of consciousness
+s my way..:?!
People who think -Barbra Streisand is ugly would say the
Parthenon should be razed in a slum clearance project.
Games in the Astrodome are interesting but it's not baseball.
They use plastic grass and artificial lights. If the attendance ever
falls off, they'll probably buy canned applause.
What would happen to Detroit if cars became obsolete.
Tact is like a girdle. It might improve your appearance, but
the real thing can only be seen without it.
? ? ? ?
The greatest movie ever made is "Seven Brides for Seven
Brothers."
The Ivy League quit the NCAA because it didn't agree with the
f new policy requiring all athletes to have a minimum grade point of
1.6. The conference must also be opposed to the drafting of college
students who don't hit the top of the class. The question is will the
Ivy League have enough guts to quit America.
Don't knock General Hersey though. He's done more to
alleviate crowded schools than anything since the introduction of
mobile classrooms.
What Ann Arbor needs is a kosher delicatessen.
* * * *
Happiness is an end to all cheap imitations of Charles Schulze's
magnificent book.
Sigma Chi's mascot ought to be a wolverine.
I bet most people who lambast honorary fraternities proudly
wore National Honor Society pins in high school. Those candle
lighting ceremonies were really a drag so what are they complaining
about. Honorary fraternities don't serve a purpose? I could say
the same for some of my courses.
Bob Dylan proves that sincerity is not 'vital to success.
If one feels happy, he is apt to become complacent. But anyone
who is complacent cannot be truly happy.
? 2 ? ?
Whatever happened to Elvin Tappe, skateboards, Bob New-
hart, Bill (Bulge) Buntin, Laos, hootenanys, Boise, Idaho, the
Tiger. pitching staff, Patience and Prudence, Zeus, patchwork
quilts, and peace.
Clevelandand Atlanta will meet in the World Series (notice I
didn't..say when).
There is nothing more repulsive a girl can do to her body than
pierce her ears. When any other part of her face has a shine, she
smears on a pound of powder. But all of a sudden she has to have
a twinkle in her tympanum. Of course these chicks don't have to
look at the teratoid they're making out of their cartilage. I think
the trend could be curbed if every girl who pierced her ears had to
wear a nose ring to match the earrings.
Boys who wear cranberry sweaters usually like =pink shirts.
Someone once asked me how I'm different from athletes. Well,
I'm taller than Bill Hartack and skinnier than Alex Karras. And
I'm not a girl charmer in the Rocky Colovito class, but I'm more
popular than Howie Young. I'm more tacit than Cassius Clay and
less gutty than Jimmy Clark.
Furthermore, Frank Ryan is more intelligent, Charles Goran
has more enduring patience, and even Jim Brosnan is a better
writer.
Michigan House Takes
If Track Meet Honors

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Nobody has re-
peated as pennant winner in the
National League since the Milwau-.
kee Braves in 1957-58. It has be-
come sort of a tradition, like open-
ing the season in Cincinnati.
Jim Maloney and Sammy Ellis,
Cincinnati's answer to Sandy Kou-
fax and Don Drysdale, may not
make fans forget the Lodgers duo,
but they could lead the pitching-
rich Reds to the National League
pennant.
Here is the predicted order of
finish:
1. Cincinnati
2. Atlanta
3. San Francisco
4. Los Angeles
5. Philadelphia
6. Pittsburgh
7. Chicago
8. Houston
9. St. Louis
18. New York
The Cubs can't win the pen-
nant, even with Leo Durocher as
manager. The Astros still are
buildign, the Cardinals are re-
building and the Mets still are try-
ing to lay the foundation.
That leaves six possibilities, and
any one of them could wind up on
top after game No. 162. However,
the edge seems to be with the Reds
because of their strong pitching.
Atlanta has all the ingredients
with heavy hitting in Hank Aaron,
Joe Torre and Ed Mathews plus
solid pitching in 24-game winner
Tony Cloninger, Ken Johnson and
Wade Blasingame. The Braves also
may be helped psychologically by
having left Milwaukee.
The Giants have the incompar-
able Willie Mays and one of the
best pitchers in the business, Juan
Marichal. That's enough to make
them pennant material. In addi-
tion, Lindy McDaniel will be val-
uable in the bullpen.
With Kouf ax, Drysdale and
Maury Wills, the Dodgers have to
be a contender.
The Philadelphia Phillies are go-
Vegas Gives Odds
LAS VEGAS-Las Vegas odds-
makers have made the Los Angeles
Dodgers 21/2-1 favorites to win the
National League pennant since
they've signed Sandy Koufax and
Don Drysdale.
The Dodgers were 3%-1 behind
San Francisco at 2%-1 before the
pitchers ended their 32-day hold-
out.
Tuesdy the Giants were 3-1,
Cincinnati 5-, Pittsburgh 6-1,
Atlanta 8-, St. Louis 15-, Chi-
cago 50-1, and New York and
Houston, 100-1.
In the American League, Balti-
more and Minnesota were 3-1
favorites, New York and Detroit
5-1, Chicago 6-1, Cleveland 8-1,
California 20-1, and B o st o n,
Washington and Kansas City,
100-i.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
Angeles, "Locomotion of Microorgan-
isms" 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
Joint Judiciary Council: Regular
meeting of Joint Judiciary Council,
Wed., April 6 at 7 p.m. in the SAB.
Cases will be heard at that time. The
Council will be comprised of the new
members. Old ,members need not at-
tend.
General Notices
Student Accounts: Your attention is
called to the following rules passed by
the Regents at their meeting on Feb.
28, 1936: Students shall pay all accounts
due. the University not later than the
last day of classes of each semester
or summer session. Student loans which
are not paid or renewed or subject to
this regulation; however, student loans
not yet due are exempt. Any unpaid
accounts at the close of business on
the last day of classes will; be reported

to the Cashier of the University and
a) All academic credits will be with-
held, the grades for the semester or
summer session just completed will not
(Continued on Page 8)

ing through their annual spriny to give the Tigers the edge over
housecleaning after the winter the Orioles and defending cham-
deals. Gene Mauch still is looking pion Twins in what figures to be
one of the tightest American
for more pitching and juggling League pennant races in history.
in the outfield. The predicted order of finish:
* * 1. Detroit
The Minnesota Twins and Los 2. Baltimore
Angeles Dodgers still were battling 3. Minnesota
in the 1965 World Series when the 4. Cleveland
Detroit Tigers, who had failed to 5. New York
make the baseball classic for two 6. Chicago
decades, completed the trade that 7. California
may put them in the 1966 World 8. Washington
Series. 9. Kansas City
The deal with Boston, engineer- 10. Boston
ed by Jim Campbell, Detroit's gen- The race would seem to be open
eral manager, brought the Tigers to six teams with only the Angels,
veteran pitcher Bill Monbouquette Senators, Athletics and Red Sox
in exchange for infielder George out of it. The White Sox, how-
Smith and outfielder George ever, still lack enough hitting and
Thomas. It was regarded a steal the Yankees are in a partial re-
for the Tigers. building program with Mickey
The Monbouquette trade appears Mantle still a questionmark.

A professor of
classical Greek
Kept searching for
objects unique.
They caused him to snicker
Except Colt Malt Liquor-.
So he sat down and
drank his critique!
A completely
unique experience?
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Pennant Factors: Kou fax and Drysdale

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State St. at North Univ.

Michigan Hotse West -Quad,
scraped together 24 points to win
the IM residence hall track meet
yesterday. It was followed by Scott
with 20 points and Wenley with
19 points. Hayden House took
fourth with 14 points.
Individual winners are as fol-
lows:
HIGH HURDLES-Ed Greene
(Hayden). Time-9.4.

MILE RUN - Ted Gillespie
(Scott). Time-4:56.
50-YD. DASH -- Tom Pullen
(Michigan). Time-6.6.
440-YD. RUN - Bill Bracht
(Strauss). Time-57.5.
880-YD. RUN-Dave Thomp-
son (Michigan. Time-2:12.3.
BROAD JUMP - Dave Phlum
(Strauss). Distance-18'4 ".
POLE VAULT - Dave Noshay
(Taylor). Distance-10'4".
SHOT PUT - Ron Thompson
(Gomberg). Distance-46'8".
HIGH JUMP - Les Pittle
(Michigan). Distance-5'8".

We don't call
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SCORES

EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Atlanta 5, Pittsburgh 4
Baltimore 11, Boston 6
New York (N) 11, Detroit 2
San Francisco 7, Los Angeles 2
Chicago (A) 2, Cincinnati 1 (17 inn)
Cleveland 8, Chicago (N) 5
Philadelphia 2, St. Louis 0
Kansas City vs. Houston (rain)
Washington vs. New York (A) (rain)
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER

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