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April 05, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PA+GETWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, APRIL 5. 1996

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. APRIl. ~ IARR

v uva .a-, - arau'/r a7VV

New FDA Head Questions
Drug Safety, Effectiveness

LATTIMORE:
Many in 1949 Favored
China Recognition

American Concern Grows
As Dominican Vote Nears

HOLY WEEK
NOON DISCUSSION
APRIL 4-7
Tues: I mplications of the DEATH of Christ
PROF. OLIN BROWDER, Prof. of Low

i

By KATHIE GLEBE I
Controversy over the effective-
ness of many commercial drugs
has prompted the Food and Drug
Administration to initiate a drug-
by-drug investigation.
The FDA, under the leadership
of new Commissioner Dr. James
L. Goddard, is tightening its con-
trol over hundreds of drug manu-
facturing companies.
Goddard said that the former
medical director of the agency,
Dr. Joseph F. Sadusk Jr., began
a screening project involving
thousands of drugs just before his
office was taken over by Dr. Rob-
ert J. Robinson recently.
Among the products being in-
vestigated are many that were ap-
proved as safe by the FDA before
its 1962 ruling, which requires all
antibiotics to be proven effective
as well as safe. FDA officials spec-
ulate that a number of drugs un-
likely to pass such tests of effi-
ciency will be quietly taken off
the market.
The agencyy also announced that
r special controls were being im-
posed on 16 tranquilizers, stimu-
lants and hallucination-producing
drugs. Together with certain other
stimulants and sedatives, they are
considered habit-forming by the
FDA and are available only with
a prescription.
It is hoped that special con-
trols and accounting procedures
will make it easier for the drug
agency to note instances of exces-
sive use of the drugs.
Many manufacturers had a fore-
taste of the pharmaceutical ban
on March 8, when the FDA ban-
ned the production of hundreds of
antibiotic throat lozenges because
no substantial medical evidence
of effectiveness" was found.
The FDA crackdown primarily
affects the practicing physician
and has had little effect on 'such
institutions as University Hos-
pital.
All drugs that are dispensed at
the Hospital must be approved by
a joint committee, thus insuring
the use of quality drugs. Also, the
Hospital's various specialty groups
can have an influence on the us-
age of a drug. A physician can
accordingly find out which drugs
yield the best results with little
trouble.,
Many have speculated that the
current strengthening of the FDA
is essentially a product of the
thalidomide tragedy, in which a
I A cross
TUESDAY, APRIL 5
S p.m.-Dr. John Gosling of the
Michigan r Medical School will
speakat the College of Pharmacy
Annual Honors Banquet in the
Anderson Room, Michigan Union.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6
8 pr. - Peter Taylor, novelist
and short story writer, will speak
at a Hopwood Lecture on "That
Cloistered Jazz" in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will "present Henrik; Ibsen's "Peer
Gynt" in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Choir
and Chamber Orchestra, conduct-
ed by Prof. Maynard Klein, will
present a concert in Hill Aud.

sedative was responsible for the
birth of malformed babies.
However, discontent with the in-
creasing FDA authority has been
manifest on several occasions re-
cently.
Dr. Verne L. Brechner of UCLA
Medical Center, who used one of
the now prohibited drugs on him-
self, called for lifting of the FDA
ban on testing the drug. DMSO
(dimethylsulfoxide) on humans.
Brechner told the California
Medical Association that he and
two colleagues had painted DMSO
on their skin without serious side
effects, even though many other
experimentors reported eye dam-
age in animals as a result of using
the drug, once hailed as a fan-
tastic bactericide and anesthetic.
"I don't believe any function of
government should prevent quai-
fied investigation," he commented.
"I can't imagine any agency tell-
ing scientists they can't be
curious."~
Dr. Chauncey D. Leake, former
president of the American Asso-
ciation for the Advancement of
Science, remarked that physicians
are qualified to decide whether or
not a certain drug should be ad-
ministered. He added that the
government's role should be to
disseminate information on drugs
like DMSO and leave the rest up
to the practitioners.
At the same time, several phar-
macists have expressed puzzlement
at the FDA ban of throat lozenges,
saying that they have recommend-
ed such products in the past. "The
lubrication f r o m the lozenges
help," one New York druggist in-
sisted, while another remarked
that the throat discs were very
effective and that he had "never
had a complaint."
Patronize the
Daily Advertisers

(Continued from Page 1)
Department on Far Eastern af-
fairs. McCarthy claimed that Lat-
timore was not only a Communist
but that he was conducting es-
pionage activities as well.
Finally after John Hopkins had
abolished the Page School be-
cause of McCarthy's attack, and
the senator lost his war with the
Army, the Justice Department and
the FBI exonerated Owen Latti-
more.
Perhaps all this explained why
Lattimore declined to answer any
more questions in the back seat
of the Ford. But there was a brief
respite.
He laughed hilariously when
The Daily reporter told him that
his former employer, the State
Department, had declined to send
a representative to debate him

explaining, "We don't leave Wash-
ington except for an occasional
trip to South Viet Nam."
Forgetting his animosity toward
the press for a moment he answer-
ed an inquiry about Chinese Com-
munism.
Lattimore who has had first-
hand experience with abusive
labels said he would like to stop
talking about "ideological tags
such as Communism, Facism or
democracy."
He suggested that the growth
of nationalism invalidates the tra-
ditional concept of Communist or
non-Communist blocs.
"We shouldn't ask what the
Chinese Communists are going to
do next but rather what any rea-
sonable human being would do
when faced with the problems the
Chinese face."

Board Approves Discussion
On Coed Admission to Yale

SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican
Republic (P)--A question Domini-
cans frequently ask these days is:
"What will the United States do
if Juan Bosch wins the election?"
The way Bosch sympathizers ask
it, the question sounds like a
rhetorical effort to convey two
thoughts: that a victory by ex-
President Bosch is certain, and
that this will highly displease
Washington.
There seem to be many Domini-
cans who feels the U.S. govern-
ment is against Bosch and deter-
mined to do almost anything to
prevent his election next June, or
his taking power.
Shrug for Response
Ask how they got this impres-
sion, and you'll either get a shrug
in response, or you'll hear that
the American press and state-
ments by congressmen reflect the
position.
The seed for the belief are be-
lieved to have been sown immed-
iately after Bosch was overthrown
in 1963. Bosch and influential
members of his Dominican Revolu-
tionary party - PRD - accused
.Washington of supporting the
coup.
There are some indications the
opposite was true. Dominican mil-
itary leaders are known to have
been warned against the coup, one
of the worst kept secrets at the
time, by U.S. Embassy officials.
Almost three months passed before
Washington recognized the gov-
ernment that succeeded Bosch.
Intervention Exploited
U.S. intervention in last April's
revolution has also been exploited,
with some apparent success, as
another example of anti-Bosch
sentiment in Washington. Bosch
claims the United States acted to
thwart a revolutionary movement
that would have restored him to
power.
Among the most convinced that
such an official policy actually
exists are Dominican right-wing

extremists, some of whom are
known to feel that by opposing
Bosch they are doing Washington
a favor.
Their reasoning usually runs
this way: The United States is
against comunism; Bosch is a
Communist-despite his disclaim-
ers and evidence to the contrary.
This gets some encouragements
from a few American businessmen
in Santo Domingo. Their long
residence here has involved them
emotionally with the Dominican
situation. To them, anti-U.S. na-
tionalism, which abounds here, is
nothing less than Marxism.
Strong Right-Wing
In recent weeks, right-wing ex-
tremists have been reinforcing
their anti-Bosch feelings with vio-
lence. This has matched, and in
some cases surpassed, left-wing
extremist terrorism. There have
been fairly well substantiated re-
ports that some members of the
armed forces have been support-
ing the right-wing extremists.
The terrorist campaign is be-
lieved primarily aimed at discour-
aging campaigning by Bosch's
party in the interior. The former
president has complained that
many of his party officials have
been beaten or otherwise intimi-
dated by terrorists.
DIAL 5-6290
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5,7& P.M.

WED:
DR.'
Thurs:
DR.
Dir.

At the GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
a cost lunch will be served
Cal 662-5189 for Reservations
--sponsored by the Ecumenical Campus Ministers--

The Meaning of RESURRECTION
WALLACE TEED, Practicing Physician
Considering ETERNITY
ROBERT KLINGER,
of the International Center

I,,

The Yale University governing
body has given the go-ahead to
further exploration and discussion
of the possibilities of admitting
women to Yale College, the all-
male undergraduate college.
The Yale Corporation, saying it
favored the "co-ordinate college"
approach rather than an expan-
sion of the existing undergraduate
school, made its first "unofficial"
statement on the subject of co-
education.
After a meeting of the corpora-
tion last week, President Kingman
Brewster Jr. said, "We think we
ought to make a further study to
see whether we could not serve
women more than in just our pro-
fessional and graduate schools. We
want to know what kind of co-
education makes sense."

While no vote was taken on the
possibility of making Yale co-edu-
cational, it was made clear the
governing body's action should not
be construed as an official bless-
ing for co-education at Yale.
Brewster's statement was in re-
sponse to the Yale Daily News'
question, "When and how is Yale
going to respond to co-education
needs?"
The governing body qualified its
interest with additional limita-
tions, saying it would not favor
admitting women if it meant re-
ducing the number of men who
could attend Yale College. They
also added that the addition of
women would have to be "under-
written" by sufficient funds to
maintain the quality of the uni-
versity.

FINAL OPEN SEMINAR ON
M and MEDICINE
TOPIC: "EUTHANASIA"
WHEN: Tuesday, April 5, 7:30 P.M.-Euthanasia
WHERE: Michigan League, Michigan Room
South Ingalls Street

HAVE A FEW HOURS A WEEK?
WANT TO HELP SCHOOL CHILDREN?
Interested in Volunteer Community Work?
THE TUTORIAL PROJECT
NEEDS ADVISORS
APPLY NOW FOR NEXT FALL-
Assist tutors working with culturally separated children.
663-8670 for further information

I,

cIIYi hu

SHOWN AT 1:00
3:00-5:00-7:00
AND 9:05

MATT HELM SHOOTS THE WORKS;
/, BIGGEST,
- NAUGHTIEST
('N -CONTENDER
SIN THE NEW
SPY STAKES"
-Time Mag.
ttuYW,&tTIESveugi
DEAN
MARTIN
as MATT HELM
SnTHi3II.nENCER
SEID S]ENS.DMiAH ~INRBNOiRUP NE[OBERIWEBBER
MESGREG6RY ROERC CAMEEBERLYADAMS n0DCHARSS

FUN! MUSIC! DRAMAI
An exciting
story
to thrill A
NEW
I .
5
WDy Poductions In
U.reeae b BEN ISA itrĀ° ui "o.YIc

PANEL I:

Dr. Roland Hiss, Research Associate,
Simpson Institute, U. of M. Medical
School
Sister Mary Ann Frances, RN, Director of
Nursing Services, St. Joseph's Mercy
Hospital.
Dr. Carl P. Malmquist, Dept. of Psychiatry
and Child Psychiatry, U. of M. Medical
School.

PANEL I1:

.1

Prof. Joseph R. Julin, U. of M. Law School
The Rev. Donald V. Young, Episcopal Chap-
laincy to the Medical Community.
MODERATOR: The Rev. Paul Light, American Baptist Campus
Center.
SPONSOREDBY: Ecumenical Campus Ministry and the Episcopal
Chaplaincy to the Medical Community.

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, April 5, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"VIET NAM-HISTORIC, GEOGRAPHIC
AND ETH NIC BACKGROUND"
SPEAKER: MRS. LE-THI-ANH
Vietnamese Writer-in-Residence

I

OPEN TO MEDICAL STUDENTS, INTERNS, RESIDENTS,
STUDENTS, STUDENT NURSES, AND ALL OTHER
INTERESTED STUDENTS WELCOME.

LAW

FRIDAY-
"THE SINGING NUN"

I

9f

L

'I ~ i~i i

For reservations,
call 662-5529

Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center

i NEW YORK FILM CRITICS
AWARD:
FOREIGN FILM OF
THE YEAR F

DlAL 8-64 16
FELIRN's
HI OR

CINEMA II
salutes the coeds

4

11

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A T

11

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- \'JI'I:. / --I ---

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