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April 01, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-01

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TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1966

TUE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, APRIL 1,1966

Appropriations Hearings
)arked by Heated Debate

MICHIFISH:
Water Show Features
Diversity, Spontaneity

Unfamiliar Music Highlights Program

(Continued from Page 1) t 1Ione or two year moratorium on
increase as an attempt to states like New Jersey and Mass-
more revenue from a rela- achusetts that do not live up to
affluent source. Another their "obligation" in the area of
ieration, suggested by Sen. state-supported education.
Cratign.sugerbornywasn.a In an answer to another com-
Craig (D-Dearborn) was a mittee query, President Harlan
Hatcher reaffirmed the Univer-
sity's continued resistance to Pub-
Edicate N ew lict Act 124, which requires all
state-supported institutions to ap-
prove future construction plans
se with the state auditor.
Dearborn
.ur The committee also questioned
uiei ti Ithe success of. the University's
Dearborn campus, which, accord-
ing to Lane, seems to have fallen
(Continued from Page 1) below its projected enrollment fig-
director forthe particular ures. However, Sen. Edward Rob-
rch then solicits funds for inson (D-Dearborn) said that his
torki community was quite satisfied
ce funds are obtained, a pro- with the campus' achievements so
director is in charge of con- far.
ng the study. The project may Following final;determination of
laboratory study of a small the University budget in the Sen-
a field study of an orga- ate, the bill will move to the House.
ion, or perhaps a national University . administrators t h e n
y. If the latter, a staff of must return to Lansing to testify
interviewers are available before the House subcommittee on
inin nt iw ac higher education.

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By GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER
"An atmosphere of spotlights,
smoke, and taunting rhythms
strips bare the imagination and
revels as the main attraction of
So goes the introduction to a
sexy but not indecent number in
Divertisement, the Michifish water
show, the first performance of
which was last night.
Besides the Michifish, which is
the girls' sychronized swim team,
the performances include a few
extraneous recruits, such as boys
from the swimming and diving
teams, boyfriends, etc. Dimensions
in dance (a translation of the
theme word, Divertisement) fea-
tures take-offs on everything
from Batman to Temptation and
Hawaiian War Chant, Michigan
Band style.
The girls appear solo and in
groups up to thirty. Highlights
are a boy-girl duet, large group
numbers, and the traditional solo
by this year's president, Judy'
Ahronheim.

Prospective members spend six
weeks in the fall learning strokes
and stunts before they are select-
ed for the team on a stunt-
competition basis. The team has
about thirty members, with a ten
to fifteen girl turnover each year.
The Michifish have transformed
themselves from virtual nonenti-
ties to winning competitors in
swim meets. "Miss Daugert has
been the reason for this," Judy
Ahronheim explains. "When she
first came to the university five
years ago, we were really dis-
organized, but she brought us up
from the depths." Proof: last year,
at the Midwest Intercollegiate
Synchronized Swim Meet they
won firsts in solo, duet, and team
events, and lost by only one point
in the trio category. This was a
far cry from a few years ago,
when Michigan State usually took
the honors. This year the annual
meet will be held at Ohio State
during the end of April, in com-
petition with such schools as
Michigan State, Purdue, and
Bowling Green.

By CAROL BURCHUK
The Chicago Little SymphonyI
Orchestra under the direction of
Thor Johnson presented the most
interesting program of this sea-
son's Chamber Arts Series last;
night.
Ryba's "Serenade in C Major"
opened the program. This work has
only recently been rescued from
obscurity by a revival of interest
in Ryba's work as a composer of
early Czechoslovakian art songs.
The work is charming and not of
great difficulty, but demands a
great deal in the way of precise
playing, razor sharp attacks in the
strings.
The Charles Griffes "Poem for
Flute and Orchestra" (1919) was
the only relatively well-known
work on the program. Flutist Gary
Sigurdson showed great interpre-
tive ability but often lacked qual-
ity of tone in the upper registers.
Richard Arnell, a contemporary
English composer, "Sonata for
Chamber Orchestra Op. 19" was
played n e x t. Robert Starer's
"Triple Concerto for Clarinet,
Trombone, Trumpet, and Orches-
tra" (1965) was a highlight of the
program. Raymond Gariglio, clar-
inet, Mitchell Ross, trombone, and

Albert Roussel's "Concertion for
Cello and Orchestra, Op. 57" was
disappointing. The work has a few
good musical moments although
not enough to sustain itself. Last
nights' performance was only fair.
Harold Cruthirds, cellist, had a
capable technique and was able to
play the difficult double stop pass-
ages with ease. He also possessed
a good bow arm, but somewhere
along. the line his ability to pro-

ical ideas was also lacking here.
The most outstanding of the
Concerto performances was Don
Jaeger, oboist. His performance
of the Bellini "Oboe Concerto in
E-flat M a j o r for Oboe and
Strings" showed remarkable con-
trol. Phrasing and quality of
sound which is often lacking in
oboists made the work which fo-
cuses on the florid, lyrical "bel
canto" writing of Bellini musically
significant.

Charles Geyer, trumpet, were a duce a good tone was lacking.
remarkable trio. Communication of important mus-

Anothony Donato's "Serenade
for Small Orchestra" is a signifi-
cant contribution to the literature
for a chamber orchestra. This
work which employs the 12-tone
technique has remarkable appeal.
A virtuosic piece for the whole
orchestra showed this group of
musicians young in yeas but tech-
nically and musically mature. The
audience demands of an encore
were met with fragments from
Moussorgsky's unfinished opera,
"The Wedding."

gram
resea
the w
One
gram
ductin
be a
group
nizati
surve
field
f.1 Al

for, conaucting inerviews a ss s
the nation. Whatever the method
of study, the data are likely to1
end up in some coded form that
permits them to be analyzed on a
computer.
A researcher can then obtain
any. information he wants from the
data. Van den Bosch noted that
it usually takes between three andi
six months for the computer- ob-;
tained summaries to be compiled
in a program director's written re-
port on the research.
One of the major considerationsj
of ISR is its role as both a re-
search agency and a training cen-1
ter.' Withey explained, "The ma-
jor 'purpose of the Institute is to
conduct research. In doing so, we;
can provide a lot of training. We
are not set up, though, to take a
teaching role at the expense of re-
search. However, most of our sen-
ior staff teachers in the depart-
ments." "Van den Bosch empha-
sized that internship training is
definitely a part of our business."
Part of the training role is fill-
ed by an annual summer institute
on survey- research techniques.
Students become acquainted with
survey techniques applied to prob-
lems of business, education, gov-
ernment, and other departments.
In the new ISR building this
week, ISR officially continues its
work in a. more unified manner.
The building will render more ef-
ficient completion of the large
volume of research projects done
by ISR.
Ph. 483-4680
EnaneOmCRPENTER ROAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
NOW SHOWING
JAMES MAUREEN
STEWART \OHARA
~THE RARN
BREED"
TECHNICOLOWt
7 SHOWN AT
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Plus-Shown at 9:25 Only
'FatheR.Goose"
Now Open Every Nite

Release MSU
Students Today
(Continued from Page 1)1
istration with taking a "biased po-
sition" on the Viet Nam war. In
October, the protesting students
were told that they were "wel-
come in the Union without their~
banners, but not with them."
On this basis the students main-
tained that the issue was one of
free speech rather than trespass-
ing. They claimed that MSU took
action against the students on the
basis of their beliefs. A leaflet dis-
tributed yesterday by the protes-
tors stated that "it became clear
as time passed that the issue was
not trespassing, but whether these
students were to be allowed to
voice an opinion which disagreed
with and embarrassed the univer-
sity administration. The students
were protesting a war which MSU
helped start, by its long-term aid
to Ngo Dinh Diem's government
in South Viet Nam."
CINEMA
presents
PART TWO
of the
HITCHCOCK
TRILOGY
VERTIGO
TECHNICOLOR
JAMES KIM
STEWART NOVAK
Saturday & Sunday
7 & 9:05 P.M.
AU D. A

Rehearsals had the aura of utter
chaos common to most large-scale
productions. "Don't forget to take
off your flippers when you leave
the pool," is a typical stage direc-
tion from Patricia Daugert, pro-
ducer and sponsor of the Michi-
fish. Besides editing the execution
and choreography (the girls do
their own), Miss Daugert is audio,
costume, and lighting director and
coach.
Michifish president Judy Ahron-
heim has her own theory about
the success of a synchronized
swimmer: "The two things that go
into it are strength and grace.
Unless you can develop both, any-
thing you do will look terrible."

iifi- ---- - _ ----___-

-- - ,
I

University of Michigan Players-Department of Speech
Presents
A ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME EXPERIENCE!
HENRIK IBSN'S GRAT MASTRWORK

i
f i'

lPIEIER l
GYNJT
APRIL 6-9 8 P.M.

Jim Brignall
voice, etc.
John Miller
bass
Bill Ivey
guitar
AGAIN

j, Box office openi

Monday & Tuesday-12:30-5 p.m.
Wednesday-Saturday-l12r:30-8 p.m.
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM

I

I

HELD Dial
OVER! 8-6416
NEW YORK FILM CRITICS
AWARD:

.

at

£4nittq)e

0.

ALSO
THE ORIGINAL

April Fool

FOREIGN FILM
THE YEARI
ANGELO RIZZOLI
prwStn" I ,i.w a
FEDERICO FELLINI
1, OFTHIE
RFIRB iS
GIULIETTA MASINA
TECHNICOLOR SANDRA MILO
'odov ot 6:45 & 9:00 P.M. w SYLVAKOSCINA

Subscribe to The Michigan Daily

LAST CHANCE
TILL SEPT. 9

OF
xrztI

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Tonight
G 103 S.Q. 8:30

April 2 & 3
ID REQUIRED

50c

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Progam Inormation.:
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IN DETROIT-...

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STARTS
TODAY

C2J~T~

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at
1, 3, 5,7 and 9 P.M.

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IT'S HERE!!!

Edward Albee's
"THE ZOO STORY"
LeRoi Jones'
"THE DUTCHMAN"
CONCEPT EAST THEATER 401675Adams
867-65
Fri., Sat., Sun. 8:30 P.M. Unlimited Run
..m ....... .... .... ...........O........ . Nmmm.. i. -
U '
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TONIGHT at 7and 9
U U
SATYAJ IT RAY'S
T W
' DAUGHTERS r
(India-1961)
I I
r I
Another imagmnative film by the
creator of the famed "APU TRILOGY"
i
r '
at &Iun

I

Everyone's buzzin' about the
- An exciting story **-
filled with enchantment! ".lA""A
- Walt Disneys
Wab
f
TECHNICOLOR*®
-
tf
"
"
A gr

.y
4
/ . .
/ .
s}

PREMIERE
The
Ann Arbor Chamber Soloists
GRACE HANNINEN, Soprano
MARY ELLEN HENKEL, Alto
MILTON BAILEY, Tenor
MICHAEL BAAD, Bass
Piano
VANCE ISRAEL
ROBERT ROSENWEIN
Guest Soloist
LARRY HENKEL
in concert
Brahms LIEBESLIEDER WALTZES, OPUS 52, 65
with vocal selections from:
PURCELL, GLUCK, MOZART, SCHUBERT
and piano selections from
HANDEL, MOZART, BEETHOVEN, DVORAK

Su
wires5 HAPp
SONG HITS1
inlcluding
"love IS a Song"
"Lttle April Shower"
* From the Story by
FELIX SALTEN

Re-released by BUENA VISTA Distribution Co., InC.,

0 e ALSO 0O
A "HAYSEED" turns "CITY SLICKER"
n r honammio 10/a WHOWLING SUCCESS!

I

All

1!

a

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