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March 23, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WED)NESDAY. MARM 2.1989 ll

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Draft Test Samples,
Applications Arrive

DALYOFFICIAL BULLETI-N
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By BETSY COHN
The S.S.Q.T. has arrived and
draft-eligible college males are
boning up on M-A-T-H and
R-E-A-D-I-N-G.
On March 17, the American
Council on Education issued a
statement on student draft defer-
ment: a Selective Service Quali-
fication Test will be given to col-
lege students in May and June.
The test, which will aid local
draft boards in determining stu-
dents' eligibility for deferment, will
be given May 14, May 21 and
June 3 at 1200 colleges and univer-
sities across the country.
The test is voluntary and it is
up to the individual student
whether or not he takes it. A,
statement from Selective Service
explained that "the scores on the
test will not themselves determine
eligibility for deferment" but will
be used by local draft boards "in
considering the eligibility of reg-
istrants for occupational defer-
ment as students."
The three hour comprehensive
examination will cover everything
from graph interpolation, arith-
metic computation to verbal inter-
pretation.
Sample questions include items
on verbal relationships:
NEBULOUS: a) disgruntled,
b) clear, c) fringed, d) stricken,
e)striped (the object is to choose
the opposite).
For those who like to fill in
blanks, the test provides adequate
spaces in questions such as:
Select the word which best fits
in with the meaning of the sen-
tence, "The simplest animals are
those whose bodies are the sim-
plest in structure and which do
the things done by all living ani-
mals, such as eating, breathing,
moving, and feeling, in the most
. . . a)haphazard, b)bizarre, c)
primitive, d) advantageous, e)
unique.
For those who like to draw
blanks, the test provides some in-
tricate numeral situations. For
example:
You have a nickel, a dime, a
quarter, and a fifty-cent piece. A
clerk shows you several articles,
each a different price and any one
of which you could purchase with
your c oi n s without receiving
change. What is the largest num-
ber of articles he could have shown
you? a)8, b)10, c)13, d)15, e) 21.
The answers to the preceding
are b), c), d). In the sample test
issued by the Selective Service,
the problem:
The area of triangle XYZ is 60
square inches. If XY is perpendic-
ular to YX and YZ equals 8 inches,
how many inches long is XZ?

a)13, b)15, c)17, d)19, e)21, was
answered c) by Selective Service.
However, slide-ruling, calculat-
ing civilians have found error with
Selective Service and as a result,
they have demanded that the an-
swer be changed to b).
Selective Service Qualification,
Test samples are available at Win-
dow A, Administration Bldg.
Application forms are now avail-
able in all local boards in Mich-
igan according to Col. W. J. My-
ers, deputy state director.
Local Area
R e miwi
AEC'sAS
(Continued from Page 1)
very pleased that the Northfield
Township site is among the final
choices. Its presence here would be
highly significant to education,
science and research. The accel-
erator would serve as a tool to add
greatly to man's knowledge of
the physical sciences. We would
be happy to be a part of the
achievement."
Meanwhile, a small group of
physicists is quietly moving ahead
with plans' to fill the gap until
the machine is built.
The physicists recently received
word that the National Science
Foundation (NSF) would provide
them with study funds to deter-
mine the feasibility of their plan.
It has granted them $279,800 for
this year.
They have proposed to use the
energetic cosmic rays to produce
some of the same intra-nuclear
collisions that the big accelerator
will produce. Their device will be
able to study the strong inter-
actions of protons, neutrons, and
mesons at energies from 100 BEV
to 1000 BEV with much better
precision and in far greater num-
bers than has been possible in the
past.
The present plan grew out of
discussions at a meeting at Case
Institute of Technology late in
1964. Prof. Lawrence Jones of the
University presented this concept
there and worked on, details with
Fred Millswof the Midwestern
Universities Research Association
(MURA). A preliminary study in
1965, carried out by Mills and
Jones, together with several other
physicists, proved encouraging and
led to the detailed study plan just
approved by the NSF.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-I
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23
Day Calendar
Michigan Association for Educational
Data Systems Conference - Registra-
tion, Michigan Pnion, 8 a.m.
Management Development Seminar-
"Effective Cost Control": Michigan Un-
ion, 1:30 p~m.
Office of Religious Affairs Book Dis-
cussion-Sarah Mahler, "Writers and
Politics and Back to aKtanga" by Con-
or Cruise O'Brien: 4217 Mason Hail, 12
m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
John Courter, organist: Hill Aud., 8:30
p.m.
School of Music Faculty Concert -
University Woodwind Quintet: Rack-
ham Lecture Hall, 8:30 p.m.
ORGAN IZATION'
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
Bahai Student Group, Fireside: "What
Is the Baha4 World Faith?" Fri., March
25, 8 p.m., 3545 SA.
Finance Club presents James J. 0'-
Leary, director of economic research for
Life Insurance Assoc. of America, to
speak on "Developments in the Capital
Markets," Thurs., March 24, 4 p.m., 131
Bus. Admin.
India Student Assoc., Prof. Bouldin
on "Economic Development in India,"
March 25, 7:30 p m., Rm. 3 J, K, L, &
M, Michigan Union.
French Club, Le Baratin, Jeudi, 3-5
p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Venez tous.
Phi Sigma Society Lecture, Dr. Steph-
en Spurr: "The Rampart Dam for the
Yukon," Thurs., March 24, 7:30 p.m.
Rackham Amphitheatre.
w w
Lutheran Student Chapel, Lenten
vesper services, Wed., March 23, 7:15
pjm., Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill st.
at S. Forest.
La Sociedad Hispanica, "La poesia en
latino-america," por el professor Tay-
lor, miercoles, 8 p.m.. 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Pakistan Student's Assoc., Pakistan
Day program, Fri., March 25, 8:30 p.m..
First Presbyterian Church. Refresh-
ments after show; admission free to
American & foreign students, faculty &
friends.
Campus Chapel, Lenten service, Wed.,
March 23, 10 p.m., Forest at Washtenaw.
Joint Judiciary Council Meeting.
March 23, 7:15 p.m., 3rd floor conf. rm.,
SAB.
PH. 483-4680
. EnaanWCARPETR RAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
NOW SHOWING

5-Hour Special Topics in Chemistry--
8th Series: By Dr. H. C. Griffin, Chem-
istry Dept., on "Systematics of Nuclear
Properties: Simple Nuclear Models,"
Wed, March 23 at 8 p.m., Room 1300
Chemistry Bldg. This is the first talk
of the series.
Zoology Seminar - "Piological Ef-
fects of Norethynodrel in the Rat" by
Dr. Raymond H. Kahn, Dept, of Anato-
my, U. of M., 4 p.m., 1400 Chemistry
Bldg., Wed., March 23.
Botany Seminar-Dr. Peter Kaufman
will speak on "Role of Auxin and Gib-
berellins in the Growth of 'Avena' In-
ternodes," Wed., March 23, 4:15 p.m.,
1139 Natural Science Bldg.
Lecture-Dr. William W. Mallory, dis-
tinguished lecturer of the American As-
sociation of Petroleum Geologists, will
speak to the Geology-Mineralogy Club
on the subject "Pennsylvanian System
in Wyoming, a New Look at an Old
Bonanza," Wed., March 23, at 4 p.m.,
2082 Natural Science' Bldg.
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: April 15. Communi-
cations for consideration at this meet-
ing must' be in the President's hands
not later than April 1.
Astronomical Colloquium: Wed.,
March 23, 4 p.m., Room 807 Physics-
Astronomy Bldg. Dr. V. C. Reddish, Roy.
al Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland,
will speak on "Photometry with the
Edinburgh Schmidt Telescope."
French and German Objective Tests:
Objective tests in French and German
administered by the Graduate School
for doctoral candidates are scheduled
for Tues. evening, April 5, from 7 to
9 p.m. in the Rackham Lecture Hall.

ALL students planning to take one of
the objective tests must register by
April 4 at the Reception Desk of the
Graduate §chool Office, Rackham Bldg.
For further information call the Re-
ception Desk, Office of the Graduate
School, 764-4402.
Academic Affairs Questionnaire: Over
the weekend, the office of vice-presi-
dent for academic affairs mailed a ques-
tionnaire to all persons currently hav-
ing an academic appointment at the
University. The questionnaire deal:
with staff members' opinions about
University physical facilities, personne'
policies, services, salaries and fringe
benefits, leadership, freedom of expres-
sion in teaching and research, and
similar topics.
It is possible that some academic staff
members may have been missed. Any
person holding an academic appoint-
ment that does not receive a question-
naire by the end of the week should
call the Office of Institutional Re-
search, at 764-9254 and one will be
sent to them.
SPRING COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES
April 30, 1966
Graduates Assemble at 9:30 a.m.
Procession Enters Field at 10 a.m.
Program Begins at 10:30 a.m.
Exercises to be held at 10:30 a.m
either in the Stadium or Yost Field
House, depending on the weather. Ex-
ercises will conclude about 12:30
All graduates as of May 1965 are
eligible to participate.
Tickets:
For Yost Field House: Two to each
prospective graduate, to be distributed
from Mon., April 18, to 5 p m., Fri.,
April 29, at Diploma Office, 555 Ad-
ministration Bldg. Office will be closed
Sat., April 23.
For Stadium: No tickets necessary
Children not admitted unless accom-
panied by adults.

Academic Costume: Can be rented at
Moe Sport Shop, 711 North University
Ave., Ann Arbor. Orders should be
placed immediately.
Assembly for Graduates: At 9:30 a.m
in area east of Stadium. Marshals
will direct graduates to proper sta-
tions. If siren indicates (at intervals
from 8:50 to 9 a.m.) that exercises'
are to be held in Yost Field House,
graduates should go directly there and
be seated by marshals.
Spectators:
Stadium: Enter by Main St. gate,
only. All shouldbe seated by 10ga.m
when procession enters field.
Yost Field House: Owing to lack of
space only those holding tickets can be
admitted. Enter on State St., opposite
SMcKinley Ave.
Graduation Announcements, Invita.
tions, etc.: Inquire at Office of Stu-
dent Affairs.
Commencement Programs: To be dis-
tributed at Stadium or Yost Field
House.
Distribution of Diplomas: Diplomar
conf erred as of Commencement Day
April 30, and Dental School diplomas
conferredmas of May 7, may be called
for at the Student Activities Bldg.
from May 12 through May 20. Medical
School diplomas will be distributed at
Senior Class Night Exercises on June
17; Flint College diplomas will be dis-
tributed at the Flint College Convoca-
tion on June 3; Dearborn Campus

diplomas will be distributed at the
Dearborn Campus Graduation Exercises
on June 12. Law School diplomas may
be called for after May 24 at Room
555 Administration Bldg.
Doctoral degree candidates who qual-
ify for the PhD degree or a simila'
degree from the Graduate School and
WHO ATTEND THE COMMENCEMEN.
EXERCISES will be given a hood b3
the University.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau of
fpp tntments-Seniors & grad students
tlease call 764-7460 for appointments
with the following:
TUES., MARCH 29-
Pan American World Airways, N.Y.C.
-Campus Repres. Summer Program for
undergrad women provides opportunity
for summer stewardess to fly world-
wide routes. Must be qualified for
stewardess employment after gradua-
tion.dExemplary academic & campus
record req. (a.m. only), Senior women
will be interviewed in the afternoon
for the regular stewardess program.
Heretoga Syndicate, Ann Arbor-BA's
in Gen. Lib. ,Arts, Econ., Music, Archi-
tect., Gen. Chem., etc. MA's in Engl.
& Journ. for positions in advtg., art
& des., elec. computing, foreign trade,

library, mikt, res., public relations, sta-
tistics, gen. & tech, writing. Also Ad-
mi=. Asst. to managing editor.
WED., MARCH 30-
Camp Fire Girls, N.Y.C.--Men &
Swomen grads. Gaen. Lib, Arts bkgd, &
extra-curricular work in admin., comn-
Smunity organ., teaching, church or
service club leadership, etc. Also MA's
in Soc. Work, Adult Educ,, Personnel
& Guid. Positions for Directors-Field.
District, Camp & Exec. Locations
throughout U.S.
FRI., APRIL 1-
Office of International Affairs, Treas-
ury Dept., Wash., D.C.-MA's in Econ,
or international affairs with bkgd. in
econ. Trng. in international ecen., fi-
nancial & monetary fields helpful. Out-
standing BA grads will be considered.
Positions in U.S. embassies throughout
the world as financial attaches & as-
sistants.
ANNOUNCEMENT:
U.S. Marine Corps-Will be in the
Lower Lobby of the Union to give in-
formation about commissioned pro-
grams for students & grads on Mon. &
Tues., March 28-29. Officer qualifica-
tion tests given to seniors with no ob-
ligation, No appointment needed. Stop
by information booth.
SUMMR PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAil-
The Nestle Co., Stow, Mass. -- Temp,
employment for limited number of jun-
iors & seniors. Must be residents of
Mich., Ind., or Ohio & have a car. De-
tails & applications at Summer Place-
ment, 212 SAB.

+ 1

F

Ending Tonight
A MOVIE THAT YOU'
SHOULD NOT MISSI,
-JUDITH CR/ST,
on NBC-TV "TODAY" show

NOW ! @-t- D

Shows at
1:00-3:40-
6:20-9:05

I

I

p

What really went on when the
girls got together at Vassar
This
GROU"-.
IsI
THSIE
TI4IS PICTURE IS RECOMMENDED FOR ADULTS

'An absorbing and gripping
movie about that exclusive
'Group'!!"-Det. Free Press

TON IGHT
The Gilbert & Sullivan Society
presents
mUDDiGOFO
at Lydia Mendelssohn
March 23, 24, 25, 26
BOX OFFICE OPEN-8:30 am. 'tid Curtain
Wednesday & Thursday, March 23-24-$1.50
Friday, March 25-$2.00
Saturday Matinee &,Saturday Night-SOLD OUT

64

09

I

an emeassu Picrures reieaseww
THURSDAY
NEW YORK FILM CRITICS
AWARD'
FOREIGN FILM OF
THE YEAR!
"Astonishing, Bawdy
Fun! Bold and Bizarre!"
B0SMLYCROWIlER, N.Y. Times
"Beautiful and
stimulating! Exotic and
erotic!"
-JUDITH CRISPN. Y. Herald Tribune
FELLINI'S
/OFTHE
TECHNICOLOR

,E

DIAL 662-6264
SHOWN AT.1 :00
3:00-5:00-7:00

THE MAN WHO AND 9:05
MAKES NO MISTAKES!

I

Across Campus

WEDNESDAY, March 23
Noon-The Office of Religious
Affairs will conduct a book dis-
cussion in 4217 Mason Hall.
1:30 p..-A seminar on "Effec-
tive Cost Control" will be held in
the Michigan Union.
THURSDAY, March 24
2:00 and 8:00 p.m.-The Pack-
ard Avenue Playreaders will ap-
pear in the world premiere of Al-
fred Jarry's "Ubu Cornutatus" in
the Little Theatre of the Frieze
Bldg.
2:15 p.m.-Jack Durell, M.D., of
the National Institute of Mental
Health will conduct a seminar on
"Thyroid Function and Psychoses"
in Room 1057, Mental Health Re-
search Institute.
4:10 p.m. - Lorenz Eitner of
Stanford University will lecture on
"Gericault's 'Raft of the Medusa'"
in Aud. B, Angell Hall,
4:10 p.m. - Gary S. Becker of
Columbia University will speak on
"Human Capital and the Personal
Distribution of Income" in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. - Fellini's
"Variety Lights" will be shown in
the Architecture Aud.
7:30 p.m. -_Dr. Stephen Spurr,
d e a n of Rackham Graduate
School, will conduct the third of a
series of illustrated lectures on
"Bioeconomics of Great Rivers of
the World" in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
8:00 p.m. - Philip Berrigan,
Josephite priest, will speak on
"Non-violence, Civil Rights, and
the Peace Movement" in the Mul-
tipurpose Room, Undergraduate
Library.

THURSDAY, MARCH 24-8:00 P.M.
Multipurpose Room,
Undergrad Library
PHILIP BERRIGAN*
speaks of his experiences and
thoughts about
"NON-VIOLENCE, CIVIL RIGHTS
AND THE PEACE MOVEMENT"
: Berrigan is a poet and the author of No More
Strangers and "Vietnam and American Con-
science"; he has spent ten years in the South,
working with the Urban League, NAACP, CORE
and SNCC, is co-founder of the Catholic Peace
Fellowship, a member of the Fellowship of Re-
conciliation, has written for numerous periodicals
and lectured extensively throughout the United
States.

I

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4

C . .

tpO4lG FORASHW70BLOWYOUR COOL?
HoM sHe=,
in PAmmnASIO And METROCOLOR

I

TECH IRAMA
"166"
APRIL 2 & 3

Shown at 7:14-10 :0
*.***MFMl-6DLDWYMN Y
ELVIS PREGLEYfa
ANN-MARGRET
. A .JACK~ CUMMI1NGS GEORGE SIDNEY PRODUCION t
k **
*4,ANAVIBION"S METROCOLOR.4:
ALSO-At 9:00 Only
2 Cartoons & Featurette
NOW OPEN EVERY NITE

(Another in the series of University Lectures
sponsored by The University of Michigan,
Office of Religious Affairs)

i

1

Wowa

axoni
ROCK AND ROLL MUSIC

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
MEN'S GLEE CLUB

SPRI

IG CONCERT

X,

TOM BLOOMER
764-0733
662-2788

Saturday, April

2

.. . 8:30 P.M.

m

Synchronized Swim Show
University of Michigan Michifish
presents
"DIVERTISSEMENT"
rTL F._ 'T. ' C. 0 e-A d4t7fAll

a

"It hurts to put you in the driver seat."

\ nMF 1/ T L, Yvly l L~ IIUln DBy flIWaIu DaiuIIuKI

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