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March 22, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TtITfit1AV- "M°AR!VU 99 116919t

.A. EG T H I H G N A L TI'T ~ ffA~1~o ,ij

iur.a"Ax, mutt," ZZ, 1966

5

CIRCLE SOCIETY
IS COMPOSED OF INDEPENDENT WOMEN
OF OUTSTANDING SERVICE & LEADERSHIP
WITHIN THE DORM SYSTEM.
AS A REPRESENTATIVE OF THESE WOMEN,
THIS SOCIETY HAS ENDORSED
THE FOLLOWING FOR SGC POSTS:

AAU Mustangs Win
As Cazzie Hits 23

Wrestler Excels Under Pressure

ROBINSON
SAMPSON
MIKE DEAN

FRED SMITH
CHERYL DEMBE
RUTH BAUMANN

DENVER, Colo. ()-All-Ameri-
ca Cazzie Russell and his Dear-
born, Mich., teammates sidelined
No. 1 seeded and defending cham-
pion Armed Forces All-Stars 75-
72, and Bartlesville, Okla. whipped
Torrance, Calif., 69-54, in quarter-
final games of the National AAU
Basketball Tournament last night.
Denver edged Arkansas City,
Kan., 66-65, in another quarter-
final game and will meet Bartles-
ville in Tuesday night's semifinal
round. The Russell-led Michigan
squad will meet the winner of
last night's final quarter-final
game between Knoxville, Tenn.,
and Akron, Ohio.
Russell went on a 14-point scor-
ing spree in the closing minutes,
kicking off the rally with a jump-
er from the corner. His spurt gave
Dearborn the lead for the first
time.
Russell scored 23 points, the last
two on free throws that turned out
to be the winning points with
eight seconds remaining.
Oliver Darden, another Univer-
sity star, nearly matched team-
I 11

mate Russell's performance, scor-
ing 21 points,
Sunday, the Dearborn Ford
Mustangs, led by Russell, defeated
Gibble Gas, of Cushing, Okla., 77-
58.
Russell and Oliver Darden, the
Michigan captain, garnered the
scoring honors when they connect-
ed for 12 points apiece. Larry Tre-
goning, former Wolverine captain,
hit for 9 while John Clawson
netted 8, and John Thompson 6.
Showing well-balanced scoring
and excellent teamwork in the
first half, the Mustangs out-
gunned, outrebounded and badly
outclassed the Gibble Gas team
to an overwhelming 50-21 lead.

By CARL RAYFORD
From Grand Rapids, Minn., the
University of Michigan received
one of the finest competitors that
it possesses today, Jim Kamman.
As a sophomore varsity wrestler
last year, Kamman, came from al-
most total oblivion to capture the
Big Ten championship in the 157
pound class. Ever since then, Kam-
man has been an inspiration to
his teammates for he has set an
example worthy of observing.
Early this season, his knee was
twisted in a serious injury which
necessitated an operation and ab-
sence from competition until the
final conference meet against
Michigan State. Although the in-
jury was enough to normally stop
anyone for the entire season,
Kamman was determined to get
back and compete. He explained,
"The guy I was wrestling decided

NCAA tournament, knows it will
be tough going, but it couldn't
be any rougher than last year. He
was Big Ten champ and then in
the NCAA tournament he lost his
first match and didn't place at all.
Kamman is now a junior and a
student in the school of education.
After graduation he plans to teach
or coach at either high school or
junior college. Kamman has good
reason for wishing to go into the
coaching field.
"I've always had fine coaches,"
he said. In high school, a former
Michigan great wrestling star,
Skip Nalen was his instructor. Un-
der Nalen, Kamman rose to take
fourth for his division in Minne-
sota. Later, under the successful
Michigan coach, Cliff Keen, Kam-
man won the Big Ten title.
No Family Tradition
Unlike many other college ath-
letes, Kamman's father never was
a great football star nor was his
brother, primarily because he has
no brother. Kamman has one old-
er sister, his parents round out his,
family number. However, cousins

of his are prominent in Minnesota
sports. One cousin in high school
is the best swimmer in the state
for his grade.
As for the present, Kamman has
decided to go to school this sum-'
mer for one session and then go
to work. In the approaching NCAA
competition, he will be wrestling
at 152 pounds instead of his usual
157. This change is necessary be-
cause the NCAA rules don't have
a 157 pound category and the only
class he could' make it in is 152.
Folk Music Fan
Outside of school work and var-
sity wrestling, his main interests
are music; photography and var-
ious sports. One of the most avid
folk music fans, he has a collec-
tion of over 100 records.
His biggest regret is that he
never learned how to play a mus-
ical instrument for he has been
too busy in sports. It is not just
wrestling alone, paddleball and
weightlifting are a few of his
other time consuming sports ac-
tivities.'
Today, the wrestling team leaves

for Ames, Iowa, to participate in
the NCAA meet. Although Kam-
man will definitely be disadvant-
aged by his conditioning, he will
be in there for the fight because
he is such a fine competitor.
Coach's Praise
Wrestling coach Cliff Keen says
"Kamman was really sensational
last year when he rose to the
occasion and won the Big Ten
championship. This stamps him as
a great competitor. This season he
looked very good at the beginning
of the season and only lost once,
to Bob Buzzard of Michigan State.
Buzzard is now the outstanding
wrestler in his division in the en-
tire nation.
"In the Northwestern meet he
was injured but was leading when
the mishap occurred. Despite this,
Kamman kept working hard and
did a fine Job in the conference,
placing fourth."
Kamman is the "laugh of the
party" says Keen. "He is very
clever and always has wise cracks."
Added Keen, "Everybody admires
a great competitor and he is.

. . F ,..,
F A
FOR ALL YOUR FOI

*

i vv

SCORES
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 3
California 1, Cleveland 0
Detroit 7, Baltimore 0
New York (A) 3, Los Angeles 0
Chicago (A) 10, Boston 4
Minnesota 10, Kansas City 1
Cincinnati 5, Houston 4
New York (N) 7, Atlanta 2
Chicago (N) 4, San Francisco 2

MIAMI TRIP:
Netmen Fade in Florida Sun

r

9

JIM KAMMAN

i

he wanted to take my leg home
with him and he almost did."
NCAA Tournament -
"Now the injury doesn't bother
me. The only thing that bothers
me is my conditioning." Kamman,
who is now preparing to go to the

By GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER
The tennis team spent last week
in Miami getting sunburned-and
playing tennis. But it looked like
the climate change was too sudden
for the netmen, and they returned
Friday night with two 7-2 loses to
Miami.
Despite the uninspiring scores,
Coach Bill Murphy was pleased
with the spring trip. "The team
did a good job, especially in the
second meet where most of the
scores were close." Considering
that this was Michigan's first ex-
hibition and Miami plays all year
around, the totals weren't indica-
tive of the team's chances against
conference foes.
In the first meet, last Wednes-
day, captain and first singles play-
er Karl Hedrick lost to Jamie
Fillo, 6-4, 6-2; Jerry Stewart fell
to Miami's Mickey Shadd, 7-5,
6-3; and Jim Swift lost to Frank
Tutvin, 6-3, 6-1.

SMITTY
for S.G.C.

Then Pete Dixon topped David
Tate 6-4, 6-2, for Michigan's only
first and only singles win of the
day. Ed Waits and Ron Burns, at
fifth and sixth slots, lost to their
opponents, Lou Sulloway and Juan
Rubio.
In the netmen's second win,'
third doubles, Burns and Wait
edged Rubio and Sulloway, 6-4,
4-6, 6-2. The first two doubles,
Hedrick and Stewart, Swift and
Dixon, lost to Miami's Fillo-
Tutvin, Shadd-Tate combinations,
3-6, 6-3, and 6-3, 6-3.
A few changes in the line-up on'
Thursday produced a -new group
of winners. Matched against
Shadd, Karl Hedrick emerged the
victor, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3. But though'
the competition was keener, the
Wolverines failed to start a win-
ning streak.
Fillo edged Stewart, Tate beat
Swift, Tutvin topped Dixon, Rubio
won over Waits, and Sulloway beat
I know of a zebra
named Yottle
Who drank Colt 45
from a bottle.
He took a big .pull
Then roared like a bull
And his stripes went
all horizottle.

Burns. The scores were 7-5, 4-6,
6-2; 6-3, 3-6, 6-3; 6-2, 6-1; 6-4,
4-6, 6-2; and 6-3, 7-5 respectively.
Overpowering Win
Michigan's first doubles team,
again Hedrick and Stewart, over-
powered a new combination of
Shadd and Tutvin, 6-3, 6-3. But
Miami came back and took second
doubles with Tate and Fillo over
Dixon and Swift, and third
doubles with Rubio and Sulloway
topping Burns and Wait.
Besides being pleased about the
team's showing on the spring trip,
Coach Murphy was optimistic
about yesterday's practice. "We are
at least a month ahead of last
year's squad and the team is
eager and working hard. And, in-
cidentally, don't forget two boys
who didn't make the trip-Ron
Teegarden and Bob Petrula. They
will be in there."
Cautious Picks
Though cautioning that it's still
too early to tell, Murphy picks
Wisconsin and Indiana as Michi-
gan's 'toughest Big Ten competi-
tion. But the NCAA meet isn't
until June and the next meet
won't be until April 15 and 16,
when the netters meet Minnesota
and Michigan State at Ann Arbor.
But if you're dying to see the
Michigan netmen before then,
don't try the Michigan tennis
courts, because at present they
are nonexistant. The-team is prac-
ticing at an Ann Arbor country
club until they are rebuilt.

#"

A

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Box Storage Plan
1. If you have a lot of woolen garments (and
most people do) then Greene's box storage plan
is the one for you. Just call for your individual
clothing hamper, fill it with your out-of-season
garments. We will pick up the box, give the
garments our famous Micro-cleaning, moth-
proof them, and store them in our air-condi-
tioned vault. Call in the fall and we will de-
liver, freshly pressed, on hangers, and ready to
wear. Of course, your garments in the hands of
Greene's are fully insured.

* The Paulist Father is a modern
man in every sense of the word. He
is a man of this age, cognizant of
the needs of modern men. He is
free from stifling formalism, is a
pioneer in using contemporary
ways to work with,- for and among'
100 million-non-Catholic Amer-
icans. He is a missionary to his own
people--the American people. He
utilizes modern techniques to ful-
f ill his mission, is encouraged to
call upon his own innate talents to
help further his dedicated goal.
" If the vital spark of serving God
through man has been ignited In
you, why not pursue an investiga-
tion of your life as a priest? The
Paulist Fathers have developed an
aptitude test for the modern man
interested in devoting his life to
God. This can be a vital instrument
to help you make the most impor-
tant decision of your life. Write for
it today.
NATIONAL VOCATIONS DIRECTOR
PAULIST FATHERS
415 WEST 59th STREET
NEW YORK, N.Y. 10019

DAN OKRENT
for SG(

4-

/ Endorsed by:
Interfraternity Council
Panhellenic
Interhouse Assembly
"Experienced Leadership"
1. Public Relations Director SGV
2. Director Campus
Leadership Program
3. Chairman Advisory Board
on Public Relations
to V.P. on P.R.
4. Union Staff
5. Michigan Central Committee
6. Winter Weekend
Central Committee
Vote
BOB SMITH
Independent,

IGolVI
tx45

"I feel that it is necessary.
that the student be involved
in University decision 'mak-
ing. Support *e, and I will
strive for an increased role for
we, the students, in ovR Uni-
versity
-ENDORSED BY
SIGMA ALPHA MU

A completely
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Plus regular cost of cleaning

NO PAYMENT DUEf
UNTIL FALL

Individual Garment Hanger Storage
2. If you have only one or two garments, or a par-
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storage. We will clean your garment, Moth-
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SINGLE GARMENT STORAGE.... .

$1.75

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