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March 22, 1966 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-22

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'96

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGS NIE

1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE NINE

Insights and insults
CHUCK VETZNER

'M' Outfield Swings Big Bats

lb

Poking an Athletic Pin i
Into a Political Snoozew
Politics is one of the world's great sports. Campaigning has fiery I
oratory which surpasses anything Durocher can dish out to a blind f
tiap, strategy which makes the zone press look bush, pageantry
which outdoes the Olympics, and participants who make Cassiust
Clay and Bo Belinsk look like Quaker Sunday school teachers. It
also has an intriguing portion of dirty play, skulduggery, cheating, O
conniving, scandal, and everything else that the American Legion
wouldn't appreciate.
Now, Michigan campus politics is a different game entirely. e
It's a somnolent affair with all the thrills of a footrace between h
Sweet Daddy Siki and Whirlaway. It has debates on meaningless e
isases and diag rallies for crowds that could fit into the Engine Arch.'
But happily campus politics, like the real thing, has its shared
of old-fashioned dirty play, skulduggery, etc. And there's no electionC
more juicy than the contest for the student seat on the Board inb
Control of Intercollegiate Athletics. Traditionally, no other election i
O involves such a touching display of name-calling, stirring series ofS
accusations, and heartwarming bellows of fraud. The campaigno
belongs with Student Government Council elections the way a '66n
lague r fits into a Chevie used car lot.a
Happily this year proves no exception. Battling for the seat
are Bob McFiarland and Roger Rosema, two candidates who falli
into the traditional opposing camps. McFarland is the Daily man,
and Rosema, a promising football end who goes by the appellation
of Rocky, is the Jock.
Contrary to what some people think, the Daily does not put a
man up for the job. McFarland, like previous candidates, just
stumbled into the race. At the beginning of the year, he was assigned
to cover board meetings for The Daily. He soon found this was
no easy task. The UN, the Congress, even the Regents, have open
meetings, but Athletic Board meetings are closed to the public, press,
and everyone except H. O. Crisler and his sixteen sidekicks.
McFarland, in true heroic reporting tradition picked up his
information by eavesdropping on post-meeting tete-a-tetes. Crisler,
who controls the board, Michigan athletics and the NCAA rules
committee, would also be anxious to give out information like "no
comment," or, "I don't want to see anything in the paper about that."
In order to get into the meetings, McFaarland decided to run.
But in the case of Daily men, curiosity usually kills the candidate.
Only one honathlete has ever been elected. The jock is well known,
and the few souls who venture near the SOC polling places figure
they may as well vote for the name brand.
McFarland, however, isn't basing his campaign on his desires
., to simply see what happens on the other side of the door. Like
previous cadidates who didn't own letter sweaters, he is pointing
to what amounts to conflict of interest charges. (Are you listening
ex-Regent Power?)
The theory is that a tendered athlete is sort of in servitude to
the Emperor Crisler and won't really- represent the students since he
is a member of a special interest group. This has resulted in attacks
on such campus folk heroes as Bob Timberlake, Rich Volk, and
Cazzie Russell when they ran for the board. But the real abuse is
against Crisler who is charged as the perpetrator of the whole affair.
Managed Managers..-
Until last year, two jocks were nominated by a feckless organiza-
tion called the Athletic Managers' Council. The primary purpose of
this thing was to nominate the two jocks for the board. And there
were charges that they didn't even do this. Some people hinted that
since Crisler preferred to have the board include obsequious athletes
rather than rebellious reporters, he helped the Managers' Council
choose its nominees.
During the reign of this limp body, nonathletes were allowed to
run, but not encouraged. Last year, a new era. began. The Managers'
Council was abolished, putting all potential candidates on equal
footing, and for the first time, girls were allowed to vote. True, the
changes are dragging behind the Constitution, but give them some
time.
Last year, an athlete won again, and folks wondered whether
Crisler's new deal was Just double dealing. The females got their
suffrage all right, but there were doubts whether the jocks
decided to run on their own or were still under Crisler control.
This year, the background is more fascinating than ever before.
When the first preliminary petitioning deadline was passed, McFar-
land was the only candidate for the job. Somehow this didn't seem
right. If Crisler did want an athlete, he wouldn't lose without a fight.
The day after the deadline, candidates for all offices were supposed
to attenda special meeting. The Daily called Crisler to find out if
any athletes planned to run. His Honor claimed complete ignorance
of the whole thing. Gosh, he didn't know anything about it. Just
out of curiosity he asked when the deadline was.
The next morning, there was a new candidate for the
Athletic Board. One Rocky Rosema. In a stunning display of
enthusiasm for the Job, it seems that the Rock had simply for-
gotten about the whole thing. Who reminded him? The athletic
department had called him the previous afternoon. Now if Rosema.
is running on his own, why did Crisler's department let him in
on the secret? And why didn't Crisler know? And why did the
athletic department call him the same day Crisler found out?

All pure coincidence.
Anyway good old SGC approved his late petition, no questions
asked. That's standard operating procedure. They even changed the
petitioning deadline for one office to accommodate late petitioners.
Who was it who said that campus elections were usually dull?
But back to the Athletic Board . . . If McFarland wins his
enthusiasm will undoubtedly be dimmed since no one single board
member will be able to make any hair-raising changes. But he will
make an effort, and he might make Crisler's silver locks bristle a bit.
It's worth a try. Besides if getting to the polls is inconvenient, just
tell SGC when and where you can make it. They're begging for a
crowd of voters, and this could be the main bout.

By NANCY BLAKER
One of the phenomenons of
baseball is that outfielders and
hitters are usually synonymous.
Even Moby Benedict's pitching
Driented baseball team has hitters
"ho are also outfielders and who
were the team's top four batters
ast year. Two of Michigan's out-
Belders finished in the top seven
of the Big, Ten's leading batters.
One, Carl Cmerjek, was so good
hat he's already signed a reportedj
$15,000 bonus with the Baltimore{
Orioles.
Cmejrek is finishing his last se-
mester at Michigan and won't be
eligible this spring. But despite
his loss, Benedict has a strong,
experienced contingent returning.
He has a veteran outfield with
hree lettermen having nailed
down the regular positions. Only
Cmejrek, who batted clean-up, has
been lost from last year's start-
ing trio. The three lettermen, Dick
Schryer, Al Bara, and Les Tan-
ona, will be backed up by sopho-
mores Doug Nelson, Andy Fisher,
and Marty McVey.
Powear Punch
The outfield provided the scor-
ing punch for the '65 baseball
team. Together the three letter-
men on this year's squad batted a
hefty .320 last season. They also

knocked in about a third of Mich-
igan's runs.
"Our club should be pretty rep-1
resentative concerning hitting,"'
said Benedict. "We like to think
we have some good hitters and
we'll try to play our best ones."
Benedict feels that pitching is
the most important part of the
game although he admits "batting;
statistics can be misleading."
He explains, "For instance, a kid
gets off to a slow start and the
line drives won't fall in for him.'
By the time he gets going the
season's over.
Not Like Pros
"College seasons are so short
that they aren't often representa-
tive of the hitter's real ability. The
only difference between a .260 hit-
ter, which may appear to be med-
iocre, and the magical .300 hitter
is four hits in a hundred at bats--
or as many line drives that some-
times don't fall in for the unlucky
hitter."
Cmejrek, not one of the unlucky
hitters, led the Big Ten with a
.453 average last year. Theout-'
fielder also banged in 17 runs.
Benedict discounted the loss of
Cmeirek, remarking, "No one
player can really be missed; that
much. A few years back we lost
a guy named (Bill) Freehan (De-
troit Tiger catcher) and the next
year we were national champions.
Schryer Better
"We'll replace Cmejrek. He had
a g'od year for us last year but to
be honest, I think Schryer is a
better all-around player."

1
s
1
l
r
a
J
1

Schryer knocked in 24 runs last
season to lead the team. He was
the team's third leading hitter
with a .331 average and equalled
Cmejrek in the power department
by slashing out five homeruns.
Assistant coach Dick Honig not-
ed, "Schryer is probably our top
hitter. He's got good power, a fine
arm and speed. He plays outfield
which demands a good arm. He is
a good All-American prospect."
Last year as a sophomore, Schryer
was All-District and All-Big Ten.
Clutch Hitter
Schryer is also a timely hitter.
Benedict commented on his prow-
ess with the bat and then stopped.
He stared out at the diamond
where an intrasquad game was be-
ing played. Then he was off the
bench shouting, "That would have
been a homerun if the fences were
in." The chunky runner stopping
at third turned around. There was
-Dick Schryer.
Flanking Schryer in the outfield
will be Tonana, a junior, and Bara,
a senior. Tonana, from Detroit,
was used often enough as a re-
placement for one of last year's
regulars to earn his letter. Bene-
dict said, "He looks improved
enough to take over a starting
job."

Bara finished second behind
CmeJrek last year with a .339 av-
erage and will return to his right
field position this spring. Bene-
dict feels Bara has the strong
throwing arm which is necessary
for the right field slot.
Sophomores Fisher and Nelson,
both from Adrian, and McVey,
from Odessa, Texas, are all dou-
bling up at two positions. McVey
and Nelson are both potential in-
fielders and Fisher will be on the
mound squad when he's not filling
in an outfield spot.
"They will get an opportunity to
play while we're in Arizona,''
commented Benedict. "We sched-
ule those games so we can have
a chance to look at all the players.
The sophomores will be given an
equal chance with the seniors.
When we come back from Arizona
we're ready to go."
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR
BILL LEVIS

AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE
TO ALL
GRADUATING SENIORS
The walls of ivy will soon be replaced by less familiar ones; equally
exciting, challenging, and self rewarding. For many years you
have been preparing for this major step that leads from College
to Career. NOW THE TIME HAS COME TO CONCENTRATE AND
ACT; TO FIND THE JOB YOU WANT. With competition for career-
launching jobs increasing at a rapid pace, A PROFESSIONALLY
PREPARED RESUME IS ESSENTIAL IN OPENING THE BEST DOORSI
Your resume, when written by a Professional Writer, will pinpoint
Your Assets, and present them in a clear positive way. It will save
you Valuable time in contacting the career opportunities You want.
At the RESUME BUREAU your resume is written by professional
writers, with specialized knowledge of personnel practices, and
wide experience in the Business and Technical worlds.
TIME TO START YOUR CAREER CAMPAIGNI I I I Learn how we
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hard to prepare fort
WRITE TODAY
RESUME BUREAU, 47 Kearney St., San Francisco, Cal.

I;

U

GRAND OPENING
HENDERSON FORD SALES
Sportcenter
March 22
514 E. Washington Ann Arbor
Y2 Block West of State Street

JOHN KELLY
for SGC

Anyone interested in playing
Lacrosse should either call 668-
8577 or come to a practice ses-
sion held by the University of
Michigan Lacrosse Club. The
team is working out at Ferry
Field from 4 to 6, Monday
through Friday and from 1:30-
3:30 on Saturdays.
* * *
Michifish, the female swim
club, is presenting their annual
show on March 31, April 1 and
2. The program will be held at
the Women's Pool at 8:15. The
cost of admission will 'be 75
cents on Thursday and $1 on
Friday and Saturday.

AL BARA

'h<

ENGLISH FORD LINE

A >SPORTS CARS
COBRA G.T. -350
angla A

"Only a representative SGC
can move ahead, so I ask your
help in supporting Council.
Only then can we accomplish
any of the goals in the uni-
versal "student's interest."
-ENDORSED BY
IHA

LOTUS-CORTI NA
CORTINA GT
CORTINA 2-DOOR
ANGLIA
Saortcenter

GT 350
HIGH PERFORMANCE
PARTS
Sportcenter

SEE THE

SHELBY AMERICAN
n v% ~ vr^,-rt%,%A r*-t

Call 662-3261

=FEW--

-

._, _ _

_. [;

DI

J

DES

'ONSI-

3L.

Tomorrow is election day. Exercise your f ran-
chise, for only with representative participa-
tion can SGC become a functioning, effective
organization.

I

nd So
IS

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..7 . Il

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DAN OKRENT
-Staff Writer, Michigan Daily
-Member, SGC Educational
Affairs Committee
Member, SGC USNSA Committee
-Former Academic Chairman, IQC
-Treasurer, Sigma Alpha Mu
Pledge Class

Russell i All-Star Game

C'

THE
r ITTOE

RUTH BAUMANN
-Incumbent
-Executive Board, UMSEU
-Course Evaluation Committee
-Wyvern Junior House Council
-Blagdon House Council
-Bookstore Committee
-Student Housing Association
-UMSEU, Know Your University Day,
Seminar Leader

9 Cazzie Russell, the AP player of
the year, will lead the East against
the West in 'the annual East-West
College All=Star basketball game
at 2 p.m. this Saturday at the Uni-
versity of Kentucky's Memorial
Coliseum in Lexington.
The Eastern roster includes
M Larry Conley of Kentucky, Dick
Synder of Davidson, Henry Finkel
of Dayton, Dave Bing of Syracuse
and Purdue's Dave Schellhase who
led the nation in scoring.
The final additions to the East.

squad are Tommy Kron of Ken-
tucky, Bob McIntyre of St. John's,
Bill Melchionni of Villanova and
Steve Vacendak of the Duke Blue
Devils.
Oliver Darden, Michigan cap-
tain, surprisingly was not picked
for the team.
The squad features two mem-
bers of Kentucky, the second place
finishers in the recent NCAA
basketball tournament. Conley and
Kron led the Wildcats to number
one rating in the national polls.

bL~I1IIi
USP Of # I~~O
,I,;
, VR
/ U1
f 'l
y e
me Yb p r CA «!
/ - ~we can't wait to
w show you the new
Clinic styles! They're
unbelievably light,
outstandingly smart and
u mndnibly (Clinic ta

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