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March 20, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-20

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ar wa

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 1966

FILMS
Polanski's 'Knife' Over-Reacts
To Symbols, Hurts Characters

'U' Scraps Poverty Plan
For Lack of Poor Students

.y JAMES SCHIUTZE
Roman Polanski's "Knife in the
.Water"- doesn't quite make it to
the bottom of the lake. "Knife"
combines, a simple slick story with
careful and beautiful photography
t say something which ends up
a little slurred in Polanski's tell-
ing.,
The screenplay speaks plainly:
younger man goes sailing with

older man and woman. A contest
ensues. Older throws younger's
knife, A Symbol, into the water.
The two scuffle over older's
cavalier treatment of younger's
Symbol, and the angry youth falls
into the lake, apparently drown-
ing. Cgptain Older Man swims. off
after the police, leaving his lone-
some woman to be wooed by a wet,
smirking crew.

Shenpp: Everything Went
But Nothing Seemed To6 Fit

By DAVID BERSON
Tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp
led his quartet throughl a disap-,
pointing concert last night in
Trueblood Auditorium.
The performance was distinct
only in the group's variations in
intensity, and volume unlike
Shepp's previous performances,
particularly his Newport effort of
last summer which was lyrical
and sensitive. Shepp and his trom-
bonist Roswell Rudd' confined
themselves for the most part to;
unintelligible honkings and blar-"
ings, while sensitive bass work by
Charlie Haden only "glimpsed
through the frenzy.
The concert began an hour early.
Shepp sat at the piano playing
Duke Ellington tunes, while the
audience filed in. It was his best
playing of the evening.
Then Shepp's group filed in
joining him for a forty-five min-
ute barrage of'sound, Shepp alter-
nating with ludd on pianlo. , The
piece, Shepp's "Rufus," turned out
to be largely a vehicle for his'
drummer Beaver Harris,. who dis-'
played other-worldly stamina'and
dynamacity.
The next piece began with arco
work by Haden, accompanied

sparsely and accurately by Rudd's
piano and Harris. Haden, who has
recorded extensively with altoist
Ornettq Colemen, was for the first
time heard in the evening :and he
took full advantage of the outing.
Shepp entered in the middle of the
piece and read a poem of black
militancy, the type which has
made. him the most controversial
jazzman today, "Take this ex-
cannibal's kiss and turn it into
a revolution." Then Shepp and
Rudd finished the piece with an
intricate blues head.
What held the concert together
for' the most part were visual ef-
fects and Shepp's remarkable
enerby. Rudd, attired in sweat-
shirt, sport coat, light blue pants
and U.S. Keds paced around the
stage, stopping to sway occasion-
ally, the tips of Harris'' drum
sticks flew off onto the floor, and
Haden coddled and cajoled his
instrument.
But the sound was mostly just
that. Group interaction was at a
minimality, intensity and volume
the only distinguishable charac-
teristics.
The sounds .and the form were
indiscriminate. Everything seem-
ed to go, hothing seemed to fit.

But then the movie ends. Polan-
ski draws up the purse strings of
his plot and knots them neatly
into a moral melodrama about
young sailors and cuckolded cap-
tains, youth and the supplantation
of age.
The cuckold, Leon Niemczyk,
prefers sailing to walking. He has
faith in discipline, skill, and
method rather than in muscle. He
started as a poor student like the
youth, but he has since acquired
a lot of things because he knows
how to navigate life. (One of the
things he has acquired is a wom-
an, Jolanta Umecka, who is the
living refutation of every joke
ever told about Polish girls and
piano legs.)
Youth tells time by the sun,
maturity by a device. Youth feels
where maturity must think. One
walks, the other sails. And one is
duped into swimming off by the
other's pretended helplessness. Of
course, while the captain is away,
his ship goes down.
But somewhere the thread of
sensitive conflict between two
mentalities is lost to, a farmer's
daughter story about boys, men,
and Polish girls who don't have
piano legs. The modes of existing
which youth and maturity could be
used to symbolize are sacrificed
to the symbols themselves.
Polanski handles the tools of
cinema well. His tendency to allow
technical concern and plot to over-
shadow depth and emotion is the
more disappointing in view of his
other merits.

(Continued from Page 1)
would have to investigate the
available job opportunities, deter-
mine the number of students eli-
gible for the project, and try to
interest more people in coming
here under the program, all of
which would involve considerable
manpower that the offices of fi-
nancial aids and part-time em-
ployment do not have.
Overworked
He added that the Office of Fi-
nancial Aids is occupied :at the
present time with more than 4000
scholarship applications, the con-
tinuation of the National Defense
Education Act (NDEA), loan pro-
gram, and' later with the Oppor-
tunity Awards Program.
However, Rea said that a work
study program could be very
worthwhile in areas where there is
need for it. The University's Dear-
born campus has a small program.
which provides salaries for educa-

tion students to work as part-time
teachers in area schools. Work-
study programs are also in opera-
tion at the University of Minneso-
ta and Temple University and oth-
er big-city schools.
Study Related
Rea stressed the fact that if a
work-study program is to be suc-
cessful at the University it will
have to provide jobs related to the
student's area of study. He pointed
out that graduate students already
have this opportunity, since stu-
dents in such areas as chemistry.
psychology, and sociology are able
to apply for numerous part-time
research jobs in areas related to
their field of study, and all grad-
uate students have the opportunity
to become teaching assistants.
Rea predicted that the Univer-
sity will probably not apply for
funds for a work-study program
next year.

STUDENT DISCOUNTS
AT
ANN ARBOR STORES?j
Cheryl Dembe
DOES!
VOTE
SCOPE
SGC Elections-Wednesday
DIAL 662-6264
SHOWN AT 1:00
3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:05

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MONDAY, MARCH 21-NOON LUNCHEON 25c
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Shows at
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What really went on when the
girls got together at Vassar
Thig
"TIE
GROUP"{
A CHARLES K. FELDMAN
PRESENTATION
COLOR by OeLUXE
ReleasedthuUNITED ARTISTS
THIS PICTURE IS RECOMMENDED FOR ADULTS

"An absorbing and gripping
movie' about that exclusive
Group' ?"-Det. Free Press

program schedule
THE
NEW YORK
PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA
Tune in the Philharmonic each Sunday at 2:00 p.m.,
(WUOM-FM, 91.7 on your dial), brought to you through
special arrangements between the University of Mich-
igan, Ann Arbor Federal and the Liberty Music Shop.
The current program schedule is:
Sunday, March 20
SCHIPPERS, Conducting
Rossini: Overture "La Gazza Ladra"; Coplond:
Statements for Orchestra; Ravel: Rapsodie Espagnole;
Schumann: Symphony No. 2
Sunday, M-arch 27
SCHIPPERS, Conducting; VAN CLIBURN, Pianist
Cornelius: Overture to "Barber of Baghdad";
Menotti: Apocalypse; MacDowell: Piano Concerto No. 2
ANN ARBOR FEDERAL SAVINGS
and LIBERTY MUSIC SHOP

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JAMES COBURN-LEE ].COBB
GI[A OIAN.[DWARD MULHARE
Poduced by SAIL DAVID"lDintedby DANIEL MANN
Scceenplayby NAL fIMBERG and BEN STARR
COLOR by DE LUXE-CINEMASCOPE

11

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q

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

U

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Adininistration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the' day' preceding'
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices ngay be pubilshed a maxi-
mum of twotime5 on request; Day
alendar :tems' appear once only
SStudent organisation no~tices are not
accepted for publication.
SUNDAY, MARCH-20
.Day Calendar
No Events Scheduled.
Evenits fonday
Henry Arthur Sanders Memorial Lee-
ture-Presented by the Dept. of Classi-
cal Studies: Geoffrey S. Kirk will speak
on "The Present State - of Homeric
Studies," Mon., March 21 at 8 p.m., Aud.
A, Angell Hall:
Engineering Mechanics Seminar -
Dr. Eli Sternberg, California Inst. of
Technology, "The Influence of Coupled-
Stresses on Singular Stress Concentra-
tions in Elastic Solids" in 311 W. Engi-
neering, 4 p.m., Mon., March 21. Coffee
served 3:30 p.m., 214 W. Engineering.
Dept. of English Language and Litera-
ture-R. G. Woodman,. University of
Western Ontario, London, Canada, will,
lecture 'on "reative . Moods in The
Prelude," Aud. A, Angell Hall, at 4:10
p.m., Mon., March 21. All interested
persons'are invited to attend.
General Notices
Graduate Students in English: Are in-
vited-to- the- English Graduate Collo-

juluin in the East Conference Room of
Rackham Bldg., Mon., March 21, at
7:30 p.m. Shakespeare's early comedies
and Byron's "The Bride of Abydos, Cain
and The Giaour" will be discussed.
1964-1965 University of Michigan Bib-
liography: If you wish your publica-
tions for 1964-65 to be listed in the
University Bibliography, please make
certain your form is returned to the
Editoial Office, 21' Cooley Bldg., by
March 31. If, for some reason, you did,
not receive a form thr'ough your de-
partment, please call 764-4277.
The 1963-64 Bibliography is now with
the printer, and is expected to be dis-
tributed by July 1966. Each head of a
department or other unit will be sent
two copies; faculty members may re-
quest. individual copies, so long as the
supply lasts, by calling 764-4277.
Doctoral-Examination-,for Melvin Roy.
Nickerson, Education; thesis: "A Study
of Faculty Participation and Program
effectiveness in Selected Student Per-
sonnel Services of Five Large Public
Universities," Mon., March 21, 3206 UHS
at 8:30 a.m. Chairman, J. A. Lewis.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau of
App lntments-Seniors & grad students,
please 'call 764-7460 for appointments,
with the following:
MON., MARCH 21-
Jacobson Stores, Inc., Jackson, Mich,
-BA & MA's in Econ., Engl. & Psych.
for positions in advtg., merchandising
& personnel. Located in 10 Michigan
cities
TUES., MARCH 22-
Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago-Stu-
dents at any class level for summer
trng. program. lea ing.,to career in ad-
vertising, Trng. in artE layut, film
advtg. prod, co yriting, mkt. res., etc.
If applying for art layout or copywrit-

Hillel takes PleasuRge in Announeing
THE VISIT AND PRESENCE ON CAMPUS
of
its Scholar-;n-Residence

r

ing to EUROPE this summer
COME TQ
Student Travel Service -
WE HAVE FOR YOU:
1. A large collection of information on Europe
2. Three travel books at reduced prices
3. International Student l.D

LEO W. SCHWARZ, Visiting Prof., State Univ. of Iowa
MARCH 18 through MARCH 25
Educated at Harvard, Jewish Institute of Religion
and New York University. Student of George Foot
Moore, Harry A. Wolfson and Alfred North White-.
head. Currently Prof. of Judaic Studies. In 1960
taught at U. of Stellenbosch in South 'Africa. Next
year will be Prof. of Religion at Carleton College.
Leading editor and anthologist in Jewish field.
Revised edition of The Jewish Caravan, considered
a classic, just appeared. Some other titles include
A Golden Treasury of Jewish Literature; Great
Ages and Ideas of the Jewish People; Psychiatry
j .::r{ "' and Religious Experience (with Dr. Louis Linn);
Human Values in Jewish Literature. Appearing
this year will be: Woltson of Harvard; Values in
;s} Contemporary Literature and The Song of Songs:
A New Translation.
Has lectured at universities and forums through-
out U.S., Canada; and in England, France, Ger-
many, Israel, Rhodesia and South Africa.
*Mar. 18, 7:15 p.m. at Hillel's Sabbath Service
"The Nature of the Intellectual's Commitment to Judaism."
Mar. 19, 1 p m. at the Jewish Cultural School
"The Jewish Community-and Cultural Survival and Growth"
' Mar. 20, 8 p.m. at Hillel, to Student Zionist Organization
"Culture and Conscience in South Africa"
Mar. 21, 10 a.m. at WUOM-An interview with Edwin Burrows,
around "Jewish Novelists in Vogue"
*Mar. 21, 8 p.m. at UGLI Multipurpose Room, for ORA
"Is a Creative Jewish Culture Possible in America"
Mar. 22, Noon, at Michigan Union, to Hillel Faculty Council
"The Jewish Image in American Fiction"
*Mar. 22, 4 p.m. at Eastern Mich. Univ., for English Dept. and Hillel
"Writers in Search of Identity"
"Mar. 23, 4:15 p.m. at Dearborn Campus, U/M Dept. of English
"Human Guilt in Contemporary Literature"
Mar. 23, 6:30 p.m. Dearnborn Faculty Dinner
*Mar. 24, 3:30 p.m. Hopwood Writers-'"Conversation and Tea"
Mar. 24, 7:30 p.m. at University Television Center-Interview by
Prof. O. L. Chavarria-Aguilar of Linguistics Dept. and
Alfred H. Slate, Executive Producer

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University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
PR ES ENTS
at Lydia Mendelssohn
JkA....L '11 IA It 4)L

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