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March 20, 1966 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-20

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SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAM M qtM.:

SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ra in U'i3YU' aLEJ 8.UL

I

Buddhist

Leader

Urges

Cavanagh Enters Senate Race;
Possible Party Split Foreseen

Reform,

Generals'

Chau calls
For Civilian
Government
Vietnamese Must
Unite; Ky Promises
Election Next Year
SAIGON (A)-South Viet Nam's
top Buddhist leader declared yes-
terday that this war-torn country
"must have a congress and con-
stitution to support the govern-
ment in order to achieve social
revolution."
Addressing a rally of more than
10,000 persons, Thich Tam Chau,
head of the Buddhist Institute,
called again for a national elec-
tion, a civilian government to re-
place Premier Nguyen Cao Ky's
military regime, and for a return
of purged generals from abroad to
resume duty with the other offi-
cers.
"They must be united, united to
fight against the Communists," he
told the crowd, many of them
women and children, that over-
flowed into the streets around the
institute at Vien Hoa Dao.
Generals
Highest ranking among the
exiles are Lt. Gen. Nguyen Khanh,
last reported in Europe, and Maj.
Gen. Duong Van Minh, who is in
Thailand.
Both are former government
leaders. Both were originally sent
abroad on diplomatic missions-
Minh to Asian neighbors and
Khanh to the United Nations in
New York. Both, like most of Viet
Nam's people, are Buddhists.
The institute rally was one in
a series of meetings, strikes and
demonstrations. touched off last
week by the ouster of Lt. Gen.
Nguyen Chanh Thi, from a seat
in the military government and
his command of South Viet Nam's
1st Corps area.
Four-Point Demands
However, Chau said a four-point
communique issued March 12,
which outlined the Buddhist de-
mands, was not intended to cri-
ticize or support anyone, or to
urge the overthrow of anyone.
The Buddhist leader reported
that he had met with Ky and Lt.
Gen. Nguyen Van Thieu, the chief
of state, both before and after
issuing the communique.
They agreed with the four
points, he said, and told him:
"Keep quiet and keep reassured
until the promises are carried
out."
Ky has specifically promised a
democratic constitution by next
November and a national election'
in 1967. Social and economic im-
provements were among other
things pledged in the declaration
of Honolulu, issued by President
Johnson and South Viet Nam's
'leaders Feb. 8.
Troops Clash
Chief field action yesterday was
a clash between entrenched Viet
Cong and a company of the
United States 9th Marine Regi-
ment at Bich Nam, eight miles
south of Da Nang. The Marines
suffered moderate casualties and
lost a helicopter in a 12-hour
fight.
U.S. B52 Jets from Guam staged
a saturation bombing of new forti-
fications erected at the Ashau Val-
ley Special Forces camp, 60 miles
northwest of Da Nang, since a
regiment of North Vietnamese
regulars overran the camp
March 10.
Lighter planes ripped at the
fortifications earlier last week
and a U.S. Air Force officer said
it was reasonable to assume the
Communists had withdrawn, prob-
ably across the border into Laos.

A MATTER OF PROTOCOL

I i
*Congress'
t Opposition
Slows Bills
Anti-Inflaionm Taxes
Seen as Urgent;
Deny Pending Boost
-. IWASHINGTON (A) - There was
t.:::...;speculation in this city yesterday
over whether the recent lull in
SSenate attacks on the Johnson ad-
}. ministr ation's Viet Nam policies
was a sign that 'it was ready to
buckle down and work on anti-
inflationary measures and financ-
ing for the "Great Society."
In the 43 days it has been in
session since Congress convened in
January, the Senate has passed
exactly one major administration
measure. It was a $6-billion tax
acceleration bill to help meet the
costs of Viet Nam fighting.
Sometime this year, taxpayers
may find their income tax boosted
by about $5 for every $100 they
President now pay-this is no more than a
Symington guess, however. The administra-
ion, Sym- tion insists the question of a tax
s a guitar raise is still wide open.
~ noina-As for Congress, it has barely
c noina- begun serious consideration of the
musically possibilities of anti-inflationary
tax action.
The action committees, Ways
and Means in the House and Fi-
nance in the Senate, have done
nothing. But a study group, the
Senate-House Economic Commit-
tee, was active all last week.
S Its Democratic majority issued
a report saying evidence is
I onigdiyo h edfraStax increase to restrain inflation.
1 It urged Congress to enact a
stand-by program that could be
ndictio oftriggered by a quickly passed joint
ridcaionofresolution if it becomes urgent.
tg out insur- In what appears to be a signifi-
cant pattern of legislative declara-
Sseem to be tions of independence, Congress:
°e. They ap- (1) sent Johnson a GI-cold war
control and bill far costlier than the one he
rceptor m~is- had requested;
of apparent. (2) gave him a bank merger bill
.ans display- his attorney general didn't want;
ets they said (3) shelved his request for re-
tic missiles peal of section 14B of the Taft-
m- their tar- Hartley Act permitting states to
ers here are ban the union shop.
evaluate this.' But there seems little doubt the
are displays White House has got the message:
dels. "Great Society" legislation, is in
the fact of for a mauling from divergent ele-
itercept mis- ments which often clash over ob-
Pacific tests jectives but seem to have a new-
might also found tendency to unite against
~what Johnson says he wants.

James W. Symington, appointed yesterday as the new chief of protocol is shown above with
Lyndon B. Johnson on the White House grounds. Symington, 38, is the son of Sen. Stuart S
(D-Mo). He succeeds Texan Lloyd Hand in the State Department post. A lawyer by profess
ington speaks four languages including Russian. He is, however, best known in the capital a
player, who strummed on the campaign trail for his father when he ran for the Democrati
tion for President in 1960 and for President Johnson in the 1964 campaign. Symington's
talented wife, Sylvia, will share his duties in the $27,000 a year protocol post.

DETROIT W) - Detroit Mayor
Jerome Cavanagh will challenge
six-term former Gov. G. Mennen
Williams for the Democratic
United States Senate nomination.
Prepared news releases and tape
recordings announcing Cavanagh's
decision Friday ended speculation
over whether the 37-year-old may-
or would seek the seat, possibly
signaling Michigan's worst party
split since 1960.
"New men and new ideas are
needed. Old answers no longer suf-
fice. Misfortunes of the past can-
not be carried into the future,"
said Cavanagh as he confirmed
the week-long open secret that he
would challenge Williams, 55, for
the nomination in the Aug. 2 pri-
mary.
Air Tour
Cavanagh set out on a whirl-
wind weekend air, tour of "foreign
territory" beyond Detroit in his
attempt to prove wrong the party
leaders who say he's trying to
' move too far too fast.
1 "There is a new generation of
political leadership in this nation,"
Cavanagh told a news conference
for his anticlimactic announce-
ment. "This new generation be-
lieves in fiscal integrity as well as
social welfare programs, and that
both business and labor must pros-
per for the nation to prosper."
Thus Cavanagh raised the pros-
pect he might blame Williams for
so-called payless paydays in the
late 1950s. Democratic politicians
to a man heretofore have blamed
them on refusal of Republican-
dominated legislatures to raise
funds sufficient to cover their ap-
Spropriations.
Denies Split
The mayor fended off the idea
that a primary fight would split
the party.
"The principal thrust will be
against the Republicans," he de-
clared. "But we have to establish
differences between the individ-
uals in the primary." He said
there are "many differences be-
tween my opponent and myself."
And in answer to a newsman's
question, he challenged Williams
to a series of debates.
' Soapy Responds
Williams issued a statement
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from his home in suburban Grosse
Pointe saying he "welcomed this
test of confidence."
"I believe in the people of Mich-
igan and I believe they trust me
to give them the kind of leader-
ship they want to meet the chal-
lenges of the present and the fu-
ture," the statement said.
It made no reference to Cava-
nagh's challenge to debate.
Republican Chances
A Democratic party split would
enhance the chances of the most
likely Republican candidate-U.S.
Rep. Robert P. Griffin, who won
a "party preferred" designation
last month.
Cavanagh, who won a second
four-year term as mayor only
four months ago, began 'talking
about challenging for the Senate
even before U.S. Sen. Patrick V.
McNamara announced his retire-
ment last month.
Williams, backed by many of the
party's leaders and workers, re-
signed his post as assistant secre-
tary of state for African affairs
and jumped into the race almost
immediately after McNamara's re-

tirement announcement.
Williams, the emblem of modern
Democratic success in Michigan
as a result of his hold on the gov-
ernor's chair from 1949 to 1960, is
rated the favorite by most ob-
servers.
Labor helped Williams win his
unprecedented six terms and still
is considered to be strongly in his
corner.
Williams w a s succeeded by
Democratic John Swainson, who
lost to Republican George W.
Romney two years later.
By contrast, Cavanagh backers
are counting on a coalition of
younger Democrats, independents
and Republicans who would cross
over to combine in favor of the
mayor.
Cavanagh, as a politically un-
known attorney, upset incumbent
Louis Miriani for the mayoralty in
1961.
Cavanagh rejected proposals by
many Democrats that he run for
governor in an attempt to unseat
Romney, a possible contender for
the 1968 GOP presidential nomi-
nation.

HAY UPSET 'POWER BALANCE':

Structures Indicate Russian
Buidin Ant-Misie Sse

MOSCOW (P) - The recent
appearance of large constructionj
works on the outskirts of Moscow
and Leningrad seem to indicate
that the Soviet Union is installing
a defense system against inter-
continental ballistic missiles.
This would be a significant de-
velopment in the "balance of ter-
ror" between this country and the
United States. Each now has the
ability to destroy the other with
nuclear missiles.yOther countries,
from Western Europe to China, are
moving toward limited destructive
capabilities with missiles.

Informed quarters here doubt
the Soviet Union is capable of
,deploying a completely effective
system of protection against mis-
sile attack on its two main cities.
The technical difficulties of cop-
ing simultaneously with multiple
missiles is believed to be too great.
But even a limited defense could
affect Kremlin thinking about the
risks it would be reasonable to
accept in any future confrontation
such as the 1962 Cuban crisis.
A decision to build an antimis-
sile defense could be caution on
part of the present Soviet leader-

ship rather than an ii
any intention of takin
ance for future risks.
The large structures
of an electronic natur
parently are radart
guidance systems. Inte
siles themselves are n
Last year the Russi
ed in Red Square rock
could intercept ballis
hundreds of miles fror
gets. Informed observ
cautious in trying to e
They say the Red Squ
could be only test mo
But they also say
American ability to in
siles-proved in mid-I
-means the Russians
be able to do so now.

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world News Roundup

1.

By The Associated Press
SINGAPORE - Brig. Gen. Amir
Machmud, military comander of
Jakarta, appealed to both anti-
Communists and Communists to
do nothing that could cause
trouble.
According to Radio Jakarta,
Machmud called in the heads of
larger organizations in Jakarta
and briefed them on the moves
the military regime is taking to
purge the Cabinet of Communist
elements. He urged the leaders to
"show social discipline and leave
it to the armed forces to deal with
the situation."
PALOMARES BEACH, Spain -
A U.S. Navy task force began op-
erations yesterday to nudge a 20-
megaton H-bomb off a precarious
slope 2500 feet down in the Medi-
terranean and place it in a more
suitable position for recovery.
It was believed the tiny sub-
marine Alvin, with three men
aboard, was attempting the job on
a rough bottom filled with deep
canyons.

Once the bomb is moved to a
better location, surface vesselsI
with huge cranes are expected to
lift it up by cables, thus ending an
operation that began shortly after
the collision of a U.S. Air Force
B52 and a jet tanker during a re-
fueling operation over Palomares
Jan. 17.
MANNED SPACE CENTER,
Houston, Tex.--A short circuit in
one of Gemini 's small maneuver-
ing thrusters probably caused the
wild gyrations in space that forced
an emergency end to the flight,
the space agency said yesterday.
Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong
and David R. Scott were ordered
back to earth last Wednesday after
their spacecraft went wild while
linked with an Agena rocket.

U

TUESDAY, MARCH 22
at 8:30 p.m.

Ambassador Avraham Harman
OF ISRAEL
SPEAKS at HILLEL
on
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All Are Cordially Invited

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
MEN'S GLEE CLUB

U I

SPRI G Co

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* I
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TONIGHT at 7and 9 P.M.
R R
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"A thriller as sharp as a
knife and as smooth as water"
* by the director of " Repulsion."
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Saturday, April

2.

.. 8:30 P.M.

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street.
iig I
PASSOVER SEDARIMAND MEALS
APRIL 5-12, 1966
Hillel Members in
P PLEASE READ CAREFULLY current standing at Non-Members
full year's rate and Guests
Special Package Rate for all 16 Meals .............$30.00 $35.00
Each Seder (Complete Ceremonial & Dinner) 3.75 4.25
3 Each Lunch ........ ......................... 1 40 1.75
*Each Dinner.................................. 2.30 2.75 u
Enclosed is my check Q money orderQ(checkappropriatebox)
drawn to "B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Trust Account" for
$rto cover the following. Be Sure to Specify
W ALL 16 MEALS
Q Seder, Monday, April 4 Q Dinner, Friday, April 8
Q Lunch, Tuesday, April 5 Q Lunch, Saturday, April 9
t; F] Seder, Tuesday, April 5 Q Dinner, Saturday, April 9
Q Lunch, Wednesday, April 6 ] Lunch, Sunday, April 10
Q Dinner, Wednesday, April 6 F Dinner, Sunday, April 10
QLunch, Thursday, April 7 Q Lunch, Monday, April 11
Q Dinner, Thursday,April 7 P QDinner, Monday, April 11 I
Q Lunch, Friday, April 8 0 Lunch, Tuesday, April 12
PRINT
IN I
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Last Name First Name
A A hADI IC A "n"ri *C Dn. K ID

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