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March 13, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-13

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FAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 13,1866

t

PA(I~! TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 1966

'Darling',
By ABEL FEINSTEIN
and PETER BICKELMANN
Now we, can see for ourselves:
the "Darling" of London is the
disappointment of Ann Arbor. Thet
film's major fault is that its cen-
tral character is intended to be
disagreeable, but as handled by
the director, John Schlesinger,;
only manages to become uninter-
esting. Julie Christie plays a wo-
man who is overwhelmingly self-
centered and appallingly smug.
In deciding to make her forever
unaware of her own deficiencies,
Schlesinger has eliminated the
possibility of any character devel-
opment.
He establishes her personality in
the first quarter-hour, and then
forces it through a variety of sit-
uations, in a generally predictable
way.
Although the treatment of the
central character is shallow, it has
a great deal of variety and a bit

Good Disappointment

Montanaro Develops New
Dimension in Dramtic Art

Warhol:.Neoprimitive Realism

of humor in its many scenes. Miss
Christie plays a consistent figure
and carries off her role with a cer-
tain buoyancy.
On the other hand, this kind of
character quickly becomes tire-
some. Hernunpleasantness could
be interesting if, it had been dis-
sected in some detail, but Schles-
inger avoids this challenge and
disguises the sterility of the plot
with a lot of action and New
Wave photographic gimmicks.
All of these hackneyed cine-
matic tricks were particularly ir-
ritating since they had no point
in the drama. "Darling" is filled
with countless stop frames and
shots off mirrors, shots with fore-
ground out of focus and jarring
jump cuts.
In the absence of any overall
moral development in the movie,
Schlesinger has introduced, a few
trenchant comments on social
inequities, which would be more

in place in a propaganda film on
the Depression. One scene in par-
ticular really rubs our noses in it .
Wealthy types are sitting around
e a t i n g watercress sandwiches,
while a few forlorn-looking Negro
boys in antique French costumes
ornament the walls.
Reliable Dirk Bogarde does a
very sympathetic job as a TV an-
nouncer who is so unfortunate as
to fall in love with "Darling."
The plot of the movie consists es-
sentially in his growing disen-
chantment with her. We see Bo-
garde in several entertaining vig-
nettes as he works at his job, but
aside from this his character re-
ceives little attention in the script,
except in the curious final scene.
Here she returns to him after
a long separation in the hope of
resuming their relationship. They
sleep together, after which he
drops her flat, remarking, "That
was only for old times' sake." This
scene was no doubt introduced to
satisfy our desire for some kind of
comeuppance, but the whole epi-
sode seems inconsistent with the
long-suffering figure Bogarde has
played.
Besides the advantages of a
fast-moving plot and a good job
from Dirk Bogarde, "Darling"
gains some value from its many
supporting characters, who are
all very real and well-acted. Miss
Christie's acting as well is suited
to the role she has been given;
despite its superficiality, much of
the dialogue is really clever. On
the whole, "Darling" is a disap-
pointment on any absolute scale,
but in justice to its merits, it is
a good evening's entertainment
and a cut above the less preten-
tious, but less substantial films
we've been seeing lately.

Tony Montanaro presented a
program last night in Trueblood
Auditorium which most of the
campus will regret having missed.
For Montanaro is devising a new
art. It is not the stylized panto-
mime of Marcell Marceau, nor the
responses to music of modern
dance, but a totally new means
of communication. It emphasizes
naturalness, simplicity, and pre-
cision.
Montanaro assumes the role of
a person and without a single
word communicates the character,
the thoughts, and the emotions of
the person he is portraying. From
the first scene, the audience be-
comes aware of a world of in-
visible but tangible objects which
surround the performer. Ropes,
ladders, and walls are created by
gestures alone. Only one or two
props are used during the entire
evening, although the brightly
colored costumes change with each
scene.
The human body is pushed to
the limits of its potential for ex-
pressiveness in Montanaro's art
of mime. Montanaro reveals every
thought and emotion of his char-
acters not only by means of his
extremely sensitive and expressive
face, but just as much by the use
of his body. In the first scene,
"Tuning Up," the spectators be-
gin to realize how completely the
body of the mime is attuned to the
idea which the mime wants to
convey.
The movements are the natural
result of hard concentration on
the idea, Mr. Montanaro explained
in the workshop which was held
in Trueblood yesterday afternoon.
The idea is not fitted into move-

ments which have already been
learned; rather movements are
created to fit the idea, and thus
the idea is given a unique form,
depending on the personal imita-
tion of the mime.
"Lucidity is the most important
thing," Montanaro said. "If you
say exactly what you want to say,
no more and no less, then it's
good, then it's right." Simplicity is
one of the most striking aspects
of his art. A reaction is conveyed
often by a single gesture, and at
the most two or three. "But al-
ways," Montanaro explained, "the
gesture must be the right one, the
one which expresses the thought
most exactly."
The audience could see Monta-
naro's precision and clarity in the
third scene, "The Burglar," for
example. A burglar enters a house,
finds a baby, and ends up leaving
the house without stealing any-
thing.
Montanaro quickly alternates
the thief's responses of sentiment,
toughness, and greed, remarkably
adeptly.
The audience made up in ap-
plause and in enthusiasm what it
lacked in size. Drama students
were lamenting the fact that the
show had not been announced in
their classes so that more drama
students could have seen Monta-
naro's performance, and apparent-
ly without exception the members
of the audience thoroughly en-
joyed the evening.

By BETSY COHN,
Grotesque use of imagniation
was exercised with agility last
night at the Andy Warhol edi-
tion of the Ann Arbor Film Fes-
tival. Excerpts from two separate
films were shown, "Vinyl" and "14
Year Old Girl."
The first was a 35 minute study
of juvenile delinquency. The mus-
cular mop-topped hero appeared
anchored by two barbells, he ex-
ercised his biceps until the appear-
ance of a "sir" with books. "It-is-
odd - to - find - a - fellow - today-
who-still-reads-books," utters the
hero in a drone which is to trail
him through the entire film. The
scene remains devoid of any emo-
tion as the foggy background fig-
ures proceed to torture the whim-
pering bookworm. Hero sings and
soliloquizes about his decadent life
-and is last seen being strapped
to a chair in preparation for an
operation "which will convert him
to a boy who never wants to be
bad."
Whether or not intentional,
there was plenty of material avail-
able to plot dissectors and sym-
bol detectors (i.e., the background
song "Nowhere to Hide," the ti-
tle, the can of synthetically sweet-
ened cola in the foreground, etc.).
However, in an interview with
Warhol, the film creator denied all
accusations of a meaningful plot.
When asked if the next film,
"14 Year Old Girl," was the 20th
century followup to horror mo-
vies, Warhol expounded: "may-
be!" (Actually, the film did de-
To Come.
s Calendar

rive from Warhol's admiration of
Hedy Lamar.)
"14 Year Old" began its horrify-
ing humor on an operating table
where a middle aged woman is
murmuring "I want to be the
most beautiful woman in the
world." "Ach du Lieber," retort her
demonic assaulters, "you will be a
beauty. . ." It is amusing when she
awakens to have the face of an
18 year old boy, and it is con-
fusing to follow this middle-aged
neuter through escapades of klep-
tomania and song and dance rou-
tines with Hedy Lamar intona-
tions.
Although further action did con-
tinue on screen, its communication
to the audience was deterred by
the antics of "underground" in-
vaders.
Something was happening
this was the general consensus of
the expectant audience. "Well, it
really wasn't happening," said
Warhol, "it was too planned .
more of a show."'
Well, whatever it was, it occur-

red ... it happened . .. with such
hypnotic and dehumanizing ef-
fects, that a sneeze would have
been the most absurd interjec-
tion imaginable. Electronic noises
wheezed inthe background while.
the raspy voice of the lanky fe-
male singer. Four projectors, one
blinding, blinking light, and film
flashes of mouths and eyes . . .
added to the unique renovation of
the Architecture Auditoriun.
Warhol peered out from the pro-
jection room and watched the
baffled and squinting audience, "I
didn't think these films were un-
usual, they were just very humor-
ous."
Campbell Soup cans be-
cause I like them" to movies, "that
make an impression . . . sort of
like a nightmare image . . . 40
sound movies because I like them
... neo primitive realism . . we.
have no rehearsals . . ." Warhol
questioned how last night's audi-
ence received him, "Well, they
certainly weren't bored," was the
only available answer.

Hey there?

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tttxtvro: . ua .v MM : +.5^. K5!.ssW ti".""".. '.YM'W3tiS:v {M N4 A .

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Architecture Aud.

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ORGANIZATION NOTICES .
..} try 1 r~f;}F r"" "r""r" } ".t." '..f .C"r:?CPw.....w.brl'7: "YT{C ,'.. ,2:;jv r'"CCY.. . q^ "}' n: i,
$4i.1C$%1.:Xrr14C~ " r6~"::rACr.ri :x~ r 4

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CINEMA II
presents
Keir Dullea - Janet"Margelin
David and Lisa

7 and 9:05 p.m.

Auditorium

A,

SATURDAY
and
SUNDAY
March 12 & 13

USE. OF THIS COLUMN FOR~ AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are available1
in Room 1011 SAB.
* S
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Intermediate
folk dancing, every Mon., 8:30-10:30
p.m., Women's Athletic Bldg.
* *
Gamma Delta, Lutheran student or-
ganization. Guests at meeting of Na-
tional Lutheran Council students. Meet
at University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, at 5:45, or at Lutheran
Student Center, Hill & Forest, at 6.
Prof. Richard Graef of Wittenberg Uni-
versity, speaker.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Sun. morning services at
9:45 & 11:15, Rev. Alfred T. Scheips,
speaker. "God's Answer for Loneliness."
Communion in both services. Bible
classes at 11:15. All welcome.
Cinema II, "David and Lisa," March
13, 7 & 9 p.m., Aud. A.
* * *
American Chemical Society, student
affiliate chapter. Organizational meet-
ing, 8 p.m., Tues., March 15, Rm. 1200
Chemistry Bldg.. Prof. Robert C. Tay-
lor will speak on "Graduate Work in
Chemistry," and answer questions aft-
erwards. All chem. majors or prospective
majors invited.
* * *
La Sociedad Hispanica, Charla sobre
"La estructura politica espanola," Tunes,
4 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia,
lunes, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Ven-
'U

Angell Hall
Admission 50c

gan todos. # .
Kappa Kappa Psi, Instrumental reci-C
tal, March 14, 8:30 p.m., Recital Hall,t
School of Music.
Student National Educational Assoc.,,
School of Ed. student-faculty teas, spon-Z
soredi by SNEA. Thurs., March 17, 7:30-
9.30 p.m., Michigan Room, League, reg-E
ister in 1401 UES by March 15.
U. of M. Student Religious Liberals,1
Discussion with Dr. Anatol Rapoport
of Mental Health Research Institute on
"U.S. Foreign Policy and Peace Re-
search-Its Implications for Students,"'
Sun., March 13, 7 p.m. in the Unitarianj
Church.
* * *
Campus Chapel, Supper & New York
World's Fair film, "The Parable," Sun.,
March 13,, 5:30 p.m., Forest at Washte-j
naw.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Worship'
services, 9:30 &. 11 a~m., Sun. Joint
neeting with Gamma Delta (Mo. Synod)t
at the Center - 6 p.m. Speaker: Prof.
Richard Graef, Wittenberg University,
"Two Worlds of the Theologians."
* *
Guild House, Sun. seminar: "The
City: Opportunity & Deliverance,"
March 13, 7-8:15 p.m., 802 Monroe. Mon.,
March 14, noon luncheon, Mrs. Eunice'
Burns, member of AA City Council:
"Aims and Objectives of the Democrat-
Ic Party in' Ann Arbor," 12-1 p.m.,
802 Monroe.
Newman Student Association, Sun.,
March 13, 2-5 p.m., Cana. Day for.
married couples. Fr. L.CJ. Putz, "The
Spirit and the Law"; "The Christian
Couple in the Secular City." Registra-
tion 1:30 p.m. 8 p.m.: Marriage series
begins for Catholics and non-Catholics
contemplating marriage and also for
graduating seniors. Each Sun. and'Wed.
for the next four weeks. Speaker:
Msgr. Bradley.
Newman Student Association, Inter-
disciplinary exposition and critique,
March 13, Aud. A, Angell Hall: "Guilt
and Responsibility in the Writings of
Martin Buber," 3-4 p.m. open discus-
sion. 4-5 p.m. discussion by Marvin
Fox, for registered people only-Mason
Hall 451. Mon., March 14, Interdisciplin-
ary Graduate Symposium Theme II.
Seminar: "Comparative Traditional Eth-
ics," 331 Thompson, 7-8 p.m.

IThe Week
ACampus
SUNDAY, MARCH 13
7 p.m.-The University Relig-
Anatol Rapoport of the MHRI
speaking on "U.S. Foreign Policy
and Peach Research-Its Impli-
ious Liberals will present Prof.
cations for Students" at the Uni-
tarian Church.
7 and 9 p.m.-Student Zionist
Organization will present Dr.
Gene Schramm, ,Asst. Prof. of
Near Eastern Languages and Lit-
eratures, speaking on "The De-
velopment of the Hebrew Lang-
uage" at Hillel.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema II will
present the film "David and Lisa"
in Aud. A.
MONDAY MARCH 14
Petitions are available for Home-
coming 1966 Central Committee in
the Student Offices of the Union
and the League. The petitioning
closes Friday, March 18.
.8:30 p.m.-The Bureau of In-
dustrial Relations Workshop will
present "Basic Employment In-
terviewing" at the Michigan Un-
ion.
TUESDAY, MARCH 15
8:30 p.m.--The School of Music
Recital will present Collegium
Musicum at the Rackham Lecture
Hall.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16
4:15 p.m.-Psychology Collo-
quim will present Dr. Joseph
Wolpe of Eastern Pennsylvania
Psychiatric Institute speaking on
"The Conditioning and Decondi-
tioning of Neurotic Behavior" in
Aud. C.
8 p.m.-The University Players
of the School of Music Opera will
present "Rosalinda" at Lydia

W INNER Best Picture!
Best Actressi
Best Director!
' Best Screenplay!
Best Costume
Design!
NOMINATIONS!s
LAREC IAVF& IK OARD E
1W IMsJULIE CHRISTIE
a powerful and bold motion picture...
made by adults...with adults... for adults!
CONTINUOUS SAT. & SUN. FROM 1 P.M.

elude Solisti Venti at Rackham
Auditorium.
THURSDAY, MARCH 17
10:30 a.m.-The Engineering
Convocation will be held in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. Dr. Simon
Ramo will deliver the main ad-
dress entitled "The Coming Tech-
nological Society."
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
1933" in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players
of the School of Music Opera will
present "Rosalinda" at Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater.
FRIDAY, MARCH 18
4:15 p.m.-Dr. Warren Bennis
of MIT will speak on "New Di-
rections in Organizational Theory
and Research" in Aud. B.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present the film "Gold Dig-
gers of 1933" at Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players
of the School of Music Opera will
present "Rosalinda" at Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present the film "Knife in the
Water" at Architecture Aud.
SATURDAY, MARCH 19
8 p.m.-The Jazz Concert will
include the Archie Shepp Quartet
at the Trueblood Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players
of Music Opera will present "Ros-
alinda" at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater.

_

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;3RD WEEK!
Shown at 1:00-3:00
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Com-ng March 18 & 19 "Charade"I

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UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, Department of Speech
present
The Opera Department, SCHOOL OF MUSIC
in
ROSALINDA
The Max Reinhardt version of Johann Strauss' DIE FLEDERMAUS

I

Mendelssohn Theater.
8 p.m.--The Office of Religious
Affairs Lecture will sponsor Rob-
ert Spike of the Commission on
Religion and Race, National Coun-
cil of Churches, lecturing on "The
Freedom Revolution and t h e
Churches" at Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-The University Mus-
ical Society Chamber Arts will in-

1966 Annual
UNITED JEWISH
STUDENT
APPEAL
March 8-17

Give hope through
your contributions

Fr..*]r MICII.IGAN

"It's great to see a spy movie
as realistic and believable"
-New York Times

Academy Award Nomination-Best Actor
PARAM4NT"EUn t Sou
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