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February 25, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-25

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25#'1966'

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 25. IQ~I~

tr

MUSIC

FILMS

MYSTERIOUS MUSE:
Music Scientific and Spiritual,
Cliburn Says at Interview

'Mr. Hulot's Holiday':
World of Pure Fun

Read
Daily
Classifieds
DIAL 8-6416
3RD WEEK

4TH & FINAL WEEK

r--

Shows at 1:30-4:30-8:00 P.M.
Matinees ....--.. $1.25
Evenings & Sunday .... $1.50
Children ............ 75c

By JOYCE WINSLOW
Some listeners at concerts so
lose themselves in reverie, they
ripple their fingers on their knees
in rhythmic identification with the
performer onstage. Yet, to try to
emulate Van Cliburn's fingers,
even in one's own fantasy, would
be a challenge for the most pro-
ficient in illusion.
Backstage after his performance
here last night, Cliburn inter-
twined his extraordinary long
fingers and completely charmed
the bevy of admirers crowding his
dressing-room. Cliburn s t o o d
straight and tall in white tie and
tails, his blond-red hair cropped
close, but curling to a crescendo
atop his head.
He smiled, spoke softly in faint-
ly Southern-tinged tones, and
turned away not even one of the
many, many autograph-seekers
without his signature.
Turning toward this reporter,
Cliburn spoke softly, choosing his
words carefully.
"Ah, music," he said, "music is
like a. big canvas. It is scientific
in . that you can only interpret
what someone before you has pre-
arranged. But besides being scien-
tiffc, music is spiritual. Music is
the most mysterious of God's gifts
to the world. Unlike any of the
other arts, you cannot see music,
you can only hear it, feel it within
you."
As spiritually-inspired as Cli-
burn's musical interpretations may
be, the precise, scientific element
of his art'is not lacking. Mr. Gail
Rector, executive director of the
University Musical Society, flew
Def eret
Requirement
(Continued from Page 1)
portant at this stage for he may
certify the necessity for the stu-
dent's continued deferment to the
University's selective service coun-
selor who then in turn informs
the local draft board.
In commenting about the stu-
dents that he has talked to, Shaw
has observed that the students
are becoming more reluctant to
drop courses or take fewer than
15 hours in a semester. The stu-
dent is aware that if he must take
a smaller load he should try to
work out an extension program
with his counselor in order to re-
tain his deferment.
Rules Change
Basic rules concerning the draft
and students seems to change from
month to month and from board
to board across the .country. For
the best understanding in is de-
ferment position, the. student is
advised to talk. to his local draft
board to receive direct informa-
tion.
At the University, "the counsel-
ing office will give support to the
student with acceptable reasons
for -continued deferment," Shaw
said,
TON IGHT
at
The
Villagers

Singing Wild
Songs
In keeping with
Winter Weekend
there will be
Small Stuff
all over
FREE
Coffee,
Tea
Doughnuts
Pink Lemonade

in a Steinway piano the day of the
performance in order that Cli-
burn could select his instrument
from three pianos which differed
from one another slightly in tone.
Cliburn listened as he played
them, made his selection, and so
acute is his ear, suggested that a
piano-tuner repair one of the little
felt hammers which was prevent-
ing one of the strings from vibrat-
ing properly.
Cliburn had definite ideas con-
cerning how he would allocate the
$5 million recently appropriated by
the federal government to aid the
arts. "First," said Cliburn, "$5 mil-
lion is not enough. I would give

$1 million to each state to people
with financial security, so that
funds are not whittled away
through salary payments. I would
have these people give the money
to orchestras, and also to small
towns. My home town, Shreveport,
La., for example, is a proud city
and could use a sponsored program
in order to buy a piano and pay
travelling artists.
"I feel," said Cliburn, "that
there should always be an admis-
sion charge to concerts, even 50
cents, so that people feel they have
heard something special."
Ann Arbor realized last night
that it certainly did.

Across Campus

N

FRIDAY, FEB. 25
4 p.m.--VOICE political party
presents the CBS documentary
film "Harvest of Shame" followed
by a discussion of the California
grape-picker's strike in the Van-
denburg Room of the Michigan
League.
4:15 p.m.-Taking part in a
psychology colloquium, Prof. Don-
ald Klein, Boston University, will
speak on "A Conceptual Frame-
work For Community Mental
Health Operations" in Aud. B.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild pre-
sents "The Puritan". in the Arch-
itecture Aud.
8 p.m.--The Office of Religious
Affairs will present Prof. George
Tavard of the Mount Mercy Col-
lege department of theology speak-
ing on "The Vatican Council" in
Aud.' A.'
8 p.m.--Sixteenth annual Spring
Dance Concert will take place in
the Barbour Gym dance studio.
8 p.m.-Winter Weekend pre-
sents "Operation M-Trigue," Feb.
25-26. "Operation M-Trigue" -
featuring skits, games and dances
-is sponsored by the University
Activities Center.
8:30 p.m. - The Ark Coffee
House, 1421 Hill St. is sponsoring
an art gallery for the showing
and sale of work by University
students. Currently on display are

works by Mark R. Sedgeman. The
Ark is open until 12:30 a.m.
through Sunday night.
8:30 p.m.-Marcia Widman will
give a public piano degree recital
in the music school recital hall.
SATURDAY, FEB.19
10 a.m. and 2 p.m. - University
Players Children's Theatre pre-
sents "Pierre Pathelin" by Mich-
ael Harrah, Margaret McKerrow
and Roger Wertenberger in True-
blood Aud.
7 and 9 pm.-Cinema Guild pre-
sents "Mr. Hulot's Holiday," star-
ring Jacques Tati in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
7 p.m. and 9:45 p.m.--Cinema
Two presents David Lean's classic
film "Bridge on the River Kwai"
in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-The Choral Union
Series will present the Monte Car-
lo National Orchestra, conducted
by Paul Paray, formerly of the
Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and
featuring pianist Michael Block
as soloist, in Hill Aud.
SUNDAY, FEB. 27
6 p.m. and 8:45 p.m.-Cinema
Two presents "Bridge on the River
Kwai" in Aud. A.
7:30 p.m.-An Indian film "In-
saniyat, will be shown at the New-
man student center. The film has
English sub-titles.

By DAVID KNOKE
A ramshackle, low-slung sports
convertible, top-up in the sunny
weather of Midi France, putters
its way down a country lane, a
butterfly not streaming in the
wind. Powerful black limousines
kick dust clouds over it, sleeping
dogs refuse to get up from the
road to let it pass, cobblestones
shake its delicate balance of bolts
and nuts out of kilter.
The jalopy groans to a stop in
front of the Beach Hotel. A gaunt,
disjointed stork steps out, accord-
ian-like. Cinema goers who saw
"Mon Oncle" last semester will
recognize him immediately - its
Jacques Tati starring in "Mr. Hu-
lot's Holiady."
"Don't look for a plot for a holi-
day is purely for fun," the pro-
logue has warned. It's true. "Holi-
day" starts as a string of pan-
tomimed vignettes, a semblance of
disorder, but the in actuality sep-
arate parts creating a unified film.
Hulot-Tati makes this make-be-
lieve world function and he does
it with such naturalness that the
audience can suspend credulity
and enjoy, enjoy.
Hulot's walk gives him away at
any distance. His jaunty steps and
ambulatory shuffling give him the
aspect of a tin man in need of a
good oiling. He stumbles over his
own feet carrying a lady's bag-
gage; yet he waltzes impeccably.
He warms up to his tennis serve
with a motion as if he were flip-
ping pancakes; yet his deliveries
come in with baffling speed and
accuracy.
In Hulot's mad universe, he is
unaware of any difference between
the mundane and the unexpected.
His gentle, sheep-dog bumbling is
infectious. Waiters, tourists and
beachcombers stopping to gawk at
his lank absurdity accidentally
commit faux pas of their own.
Through all the commotion he
causes, Hulot preserves his inno-
cence intact.
PH. 482-2056
AmE OnCARPENTERROAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS

Tati's comedy is subtle; much
of the humor develops from the
sort of socially embarrassing sit-
uations in which everyone dreads
to find himself. What happens,
for instance, when your car runs
out of gas in a cemetery with a
funeral going on and an attendant
mistakes your spare tire for a
funeral wreath? Or what could
you do about a lighted flare that
gets loose in a fireworks shed and
sets everything off? Tati, conceiv-
ing the role of Hulot as a modern
middle-class Everyman, doesn't
let anything phase him.
The beach is the backdrop for
a Human Comedy, a morality play
in which the silent pomposities,
snobberies, and gaucheries of the
tourists speak louder than words.
An elderly peripatetic English
couple parade daily through the
screen, the henpecked husband
following a distance behind. When
he stops to stare at some pretty
bikinied thing, his wife snaps him
from his reverie with a curt,
"Henry! Come on." But at the
end of the holiday, when the de-
parting guests all snub Hulot, the
old fellow sneaks away from his
wife long enough to wring Hulot's
hand and thank him for a most
memorable time.
Indeed it is.

Infernaflonal M-trigue Mixer
TONIGHT
8-12 P.M.
with
"The House Wreckers",
Place: International Center
Admission-25c/person
FREE REFRESHMENTS
Sponsored by International Program Council

Winner of 8 j Academy Awards including Best Picture.
AUDREY HEPBURN REX HARRISON

::

Ending Today
"THAT MAN
IN ISTANBUL"

r

Daily Classified Are Great!
Try Them!

SATURDAY

7'

FILM DISCUSSION

on

asia Happy Honeymoon
goes to the dogs .y
Filled
2wit
r r s.S7 delight!
WatDisney
t > , prESsnis
the
UVALT ,C
DINEYS An A -atom
Technicolor*
TECHNICOL.OR7
Dean JONES - Suzanne PLESHETECalie RUGGLES
eieased by BUENA VISTA 01Dsibutton Co. Inc -Nb5 Wal sney Poucrons

"MR. HULOT'S HOLIDAY"

ROOM 3B, UNION

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 9 P.M.

DISCUSSION LEADER:

PROF. STYAN

ML

E r.

In Detroit . .
CONCEPT EAST THEATER

401 E. Adams

presents
Harold Pinter's "THE CARETAKER"

BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
PLUS AT 7:10&10:45
CINEMASCOPE
Shown at 9:00 Only

ii

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Graduate Student Council
GRADL MIXER

IWALTDSNEY
tthefni

Fri., Sat., Sun.-Thru FEB.

Shown at 1 :00-3:00
5:00-7:00 & 9:05

8:30 P.M.

Patronize Our Advertisers
the fun starts today...

Friday, Feb.

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TONIGHT at 7 and9
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4

I

3-5 P.M.-T.G. & Dance Contest-Union Ballroom
Music by
THE VANGUARDS

314 E. Liberty
Stag or Drag

4

3 P.M. TREASURE HIUNT-Diag
8 P.M. SKIT NITE-Hill Aud.

Ray Louis Dance Band
(piano, trumpet, bass, drums)

I

Tickets at Box Office

-

i

Operation

- trigue

CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL PRESENTS
THE NEW CHRISTY MINSTRELS

A.

--- - -

I

CINEMA II

SALUTES

*

OPERATION M-TRIGUE
WITH THE GREATEST WAR ESPIONAGE FILM EVER MADE

DAVID LEAN'S

Bridge on the River Kwai

II ALEC GUINESS

WILLIAM HOLDEN

JACK HAWKINS

I

E

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