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February 22, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN 1MA TL.V

"' i' aH niivTa l1 H1\T 1bATTL

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1966

British Professor Compares.
American, English Education

ART
Dynamism Seen in Lewis' Art

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(Continued from Page 1)
problem of mass education, which
we are only beginning to envision,
since a much smaller percentage
of British youths of college age
actually attend universities than
in America.
"Subject to economic possibil-
ity-and I emphasize this provi-
sion - the lecture and recitation
system is best.
"The lecture ideally should have
no more than 75 students (which
is about the size of my History
570 lecture now). And there should
also be recitation sections. These
enable the production of written
work and discussion of it, which
I think is very valuable. There is
a great deal of seminar and tu-
torial instruction in Britain."
Audio-Visual Aids
Allen strongly advocates the use
of audio-visual aids in lecture..

But, although the United States
has many more audio-visual aids
than Britain and Europe, he has
noticed "a considerable amount of
skepticism over the use of this
sort of medium, especially in his-
tory. People seem to fear that,
movies may lull the mental facul-
ties, but anyone who has watched
a child in front of a TV set can
see that this is a very powerful
medium.
"One of the sources of this idea
for me was an American history
professor at Harvard who made
great use of slides, maps, and that
sort of thing. The student gets an
idea of the vast possibilities of
expression in the field."
Speaking of the American sys-
tem of higher education in gen-
eral, Allen observed, "Your spec-
trum of quality is far greater than
ours. You have poor schools and

--- FILMS
Bond-Type Thriller
Lacking in Precision

By SAMUEL GOLDSTEIN
"That Man in Istanbul" has
some exciting scenes, but these do
not save it from being a shabby
attempt at a James Bond type
thriller. Its somewhat tangled plot
consists of the attempts of an Is-

tanbul gambling casino owner
(Hdrst Bucholz) to recover an
atomic scientist who has been kid-
naped by Turkish gangsters. Buch-
olz comes into conflict with the
gangsters, who spend most of the
picture' trying to kill him, and
with a group of Chinese Commu-
nists, who want the scientist to
help them with their atomic ex-
periments.
Some parts are imaginative and
done with the proper mixture of.
lightness and speed. The scenes
in which Bucholz cracks a safe
using a stethescope, shoots bul-
lets into six cars which are try-
ing to run him over, and turns on
all the steam jets in a Turkish
bath to elude pursuing killers are
all pleasing. Bucholz carries him-
self with a grace and an im-
perturbable casualness that makes
his performance moderately at-
tractive.'
The main troubles lie in thel
script and -in the direction. Di-
rector Anthony Asisi's blocking is
clumsy, his cutting is unimagina-
tive, his camera angles are con-
ventional, and his transitions lack
rhythmic consistency with what'
has preceded them. George Sim-'
onelli's dialogue is flat and his'
characters are indistinct. He must'
learn the difference between cre-
ating a comic "type," whose reac-
tions are pleasantly predictable,1
and a "stereotype," whose reac-
tions are merely monotonous.
"That Man in Istanbul" lacks
precision: as a result, the excite-
ment seems forced and uncontrol-
led. Nevertheless, it has very few
slow spots, and perhaps its bet-
ter moments make it worth see-
ing.

good schools. It is possible to
emerge with an A.B.,.a smattering
of knowledge, and no real depth.
But the University and any of the
other good American schools are
perfectly comparable to ours."
Sixth University
This is the sixth American uni-
versity at which Allen has taught.
On the whole he has observed no
great differences between Ameri-
can and British schools, other
than the degree of specialization.
He has, however, noted a few re-
curring tendencies.
"The British students write bet-
ter, but this is because they have
more experience in it. Yet I have
noticed a peculiar trait of Ameri-
can studen ts. I have taught some
Rhodes Scholars at Oxford. They
are extremely capable American
students. On a test, they start with
a fundamental examination of the
question before they start to an-
swer it. But to the British student
I must often say, 'But you haven't
answered the question.' Although
the British student generally ex-
presses his answer in a more in-
direct, forward and literary style,
the American's answer indicates a
whole difference in national ap-
proach.
"The broadness of an Ameri-
can's background makes for a sort
of logic in his answer. Then, too,
Americans have a great liking for
long, abstract words. Their an-
swers tend to be more 4bstract
also. An American would some-
times rather call a spade an 'agri-
cultural implement' than be pin-
ned down to a specific term. In
America one professor says to an-
other, 'What is your field, or
area?' but in Britain we say, 'What
is your subject?'
Homogeneous Population
"I think this can be explained
by the fact that the British popu-
lation is much more homogeneous,
and therefore-has a greater sense
of social identity. In Britain we
leave a lot of fundamentals un-
said that must be mentioned
here."
Allen aims his courses at the
student as a voting citizen. "In
Britain, however, there is a ten-
dency to aim courses at potential
professors. I think this is a bad
practice, except, perhaps, in some
graduate courses.
"I am using basically the same
notes for my lectures here that
I use at home. I must be critical
of my speeches, especially when I
come to your country, and pro-
ceed to tell you about your own
country."
Prof. Allen and his family will
return to London at the close of
the trimester in April.

By ANN MARCHI0
One can't help but be reminded
of Sir Walter Scott's "Patriotism"
when viewing the water colors and
acrylics of William A. Lewis, a
professor at the University, whose
works are currently being display-
ed at the Forsythe Gallery in
the Nickels Arcade.
Just as one feels the ardor in
Scott's poem, "Breathes there the
man with soul so dead / Who
never to himself hath said 'This is
my own, my native land'," so one
feels the latent spirit behind Lew-
is' landscapes and battle scenes.
Yet this is not a blind faith. A
very striking title accompanies one
water color of an army tank --
"The Triumph of Renaissance
Thought." While the title helps
recall the emergence of national-
ism during this historical period,
the water color questions sharply
the result of this grandiose idea.
Prof. Lewis' paintings do not
end with the beauty of their crea-
tion, but simultaneously criticize
human values and objectives. For
instance, Lewis labels one hand-
somely executed view of a city
"Space Program-Urban," which
DIAL 8-6416
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has an obvious significance in our'
concentrated space race and ran-
dom urban renewal.
The most appropriate adjective
describing his subject matter is
dynamic. One can !easily visualize
the movement of his "Union Pa-
cific" and "View from the Train."
Prof. Lewis teaches in the Col-
lege of Architecture and Design.
He has had paintings in exhibi-
tions at the New York Museum
of Modern Art, Detroit Institute

I inner of 8 Academy Awards including Best Pice.
IAUDREY HEPBURN 'REX HARRISON
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of Art and many other national
institutions.
His recent awards include Wa-
ter Color, U.S.A. Award, 1963,
American Water Color Society
Award, 1963, and two faculty re-
search grants in 1960-63.
The new drawings and paint-
ings will be displayed through Feb-
ruary 26. The gallery is located at
201 Nickels Arcade and is open
weekdays 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. and
Saturdays 10 a.m. until 1 p.m.

THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
presents
T-he
Mronte nCarlo
National
Orchestra
(First American Tour)
Under the Patronage of Their Serne Highnesses
Prince Rainier I I and Princess Grace of Monaco
PAUL PARAY, Conductor
MICHAEL BLOCK, Piano Soloist

PROGRAM:

Symphony No. 4 ("italian") .... . Mendelssohn
Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra, B-flat, major ...Mozart
"Le Festin de 'Araignee, Op 17...........Roussel
"Daphnis and Chloe" Suite No. 2 .......Ravel

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The
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YNTEMA DIES
Hessel E. Yntema, professor-
emeritus of the Law School,
died yesterday at St. Joseph,
Mercy Hospital at the age of
75. He was a member of the
Law School faculty from 1917-
20 and from 1933 until he re-
tired in 1961. He had been the
founder and editor-in-chief of
the American Journal of Com-
parative Law since 1951.

wm
I,"

777 -

International
Emphasis
Month

Across Campus

TUESDAY, FEB.22
Noon - Beginning today and
continuing on Tuesday noons for
the remainder of the semester,
Mrs. Elizabeth Sumner of the
Office of Religious Affairs will
lead an informal lunch seminar
on "Problems in Male-Female Re-
lationship" in 2417 M H.
3:30 p.m.-Prof. William F. Cary
of Columbia University, a leading
American authority on securities
regulation and administrative law,
will give the first lecture in the
16th annual Thomas M. Cooley
Lecture in Rm. 100 Hutchins Hall.
He will speak on "The Impact of
the White House and Congress
Upon an Agency."
4 p.m.-Prof. Anatol Rapaport
of the Mental Health Research
Institute will speak on China and
Viet Nam.

4:1) p.m.-Thie Romance Lan-
guages Dept. will present Jose Luis
Aranguren of Madrid, Spain,
speaking in Spanish on "Angel
Ganivet" in Rackham Ampi-
theater.
7 p.m.-James Donovan of the
State Department will speak at the
International Center Student Rec-
ognition Dinner in the League
Ballroom.
8:30 p.m.-Sigma Alpha Iota
music sorority. will give a concert
in the recital hall of the music
school.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 23
Noon - George Abbot White
will speak'at an Office of Religious
Affairs book discussion on "The
Last Temptation of Christ" by.
Nikos Kazantzakis, in 2417 M H.
8:30 p.m.-A special concert will
be given by pianist Van Cliburn in
Hill Aud.

READ THIS!
Events Feb. 20-27
Tuesday, Feb. 22
12:00 Noon-"Recent Developments in World University Serv-
ice," Mr. JohnSimons, Exec. Dir. WUS. Tuesday luncheon,
International Center Recreation Room.
7:00 P.M.-Recognition Dinner for Student Leaders in the Inter-
national Program. Speaker: James Donovan, U.S. State Dept.
League Ballroom.
Thursday, Feb. 24
4:00-5:30 P.M.-International Tea, Stockwell Hall. All are
invited.
8:00 P.M.-Spotlight: The Philippines. Informal lecture with
slides, Mr. Clifford Sjogren. Union 3C.
Friday, Feb. 25, 8:00 P.M.-Game Night, International Center Recrea-
tion Room. All are welcome.
Sunday, Feb. 27
2:30 P.M.-International Folk Sing, American and International
Songs. International Center Recreation Room. All are invited.
7:00 P.M.-G. Mennen Williams, Asst. Secy. of State for African
Affairs. "Recent Developments in Africa." Union Ballroom.
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF YOUR INTERNATIONAL CENTER!

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