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February 05, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-05

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1966'

vsAT.URDAsf wYa' FblERRd.I AY 5i. V} .7

IV

'My Fair Lady' Keeps
Freshness of Play

By PAUL SAWYER

At the Michigan Theatre
George Cukor's full-blown, sup-
er-stereophonic production of "My
Fair Lady" is the most lavish,
highly polished, and graceful
transcription of any m u s i c a 1
comedy for the screen.
This does not, of course, say a
great deal. But "My Fair Lady"
as a play is the only true musical
comedy I know, standing conspic-
uously apart from that vast flock
of bubbly, scatter-brained exer-
cises in witlessness that commonly
take that name.
The play's great 'advantage, of
course, is its derivation from
Shaw. "Pygmalion" mocked the
superficiality of the British class
system by advancing the thesis
that all a common flower-girl need
do to become a great lady over-
night would be to change her
accent. The satire comes through
beautifully on the screen, due in
large part to the highly com-
petent performances of Rex Har-
rison and Audrey Hepburn.
Harrison mocks wickedly and
exquisitely and is a throughly de-
lightful cad until his inevitable
surrender to love. Miss Hepburn
has many delightful moments,
particularly as the humble flower-
girl. Her wide-eyed, wide-jawed
bedazzlement, her "delightful low-
ness," her unfathomably vast
simplicity, her charming . . . but
I am afraid it may be my phy-
siology speaking rather than my
reason.

Then they ruin it all in the
Buckingham Palace scene when
they wrap her in gauze and pile
her hair up fan-like on the back
of her head.
As for the purely physical aspect
of the film, it will keep anyone's
eyes agreeably filled for a long
time. Much of it is a constant
procession of parasols, carriages,
fastidiously designed gowns and
furs, and enormous pink and blue
clouds of bouquets.
Music, decor, and acting still do
not, however, make a successful
film, or anything more than a
competent adaptation. For the
most part the pace is brisk and
witty, never letting the spectacle
clog it up too much. Yet some of
the inevitable pitfalls of the
musical-comedy genre creep in.
For example, the consistency of
Eliza's character does not survive
her change of speech. In fact, Miss
Doolittle appears to pick up brains
as well as language habits. The
nervous shriek and exhausting
bounciness, which tend to get out
of hand in the beginning, do not
jive well with the inner anguish
and redness of eye which plagues
the later scenes, and which add
too much melodrama to the film
as a whole.
I suppose nobody ever expects
a filmed musical to be any more
than a filmed musical. If most of
this film's virtues do, in fact, pro-
ceed from the play, I do not know
what more could have been done
with it. But it has a verve, a fresh-
ness, and a polish which make
"My Fair Lady" if not great
cinema, at least a pleasant eve-
ning's entertainment.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
Jal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5
Day Calendar
Professional Theatre Program Per-'
formance-American Conservatory The-
atre Company in Moliere's "Tartuffe":
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 2:30 and 8
p.m,
Cinema Guild-"School for Scoun-
dreys": Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Performance-Robert Anderson's "The
Days Between": Trueblood Aud., 8 p.m.
Hockey-U-M vs. Michigan State Uni-
versity: Coliseum, 8 p.m.
General .Notices
Application for Prospective Teachers
Fellowship Program under the Higher
Education Act: A set of instructions
has been received from the Office of
Education. Departments and programs
wishing to apply may obtain a set by
calling the office of Associate Dean
Miller, Grad School, 764-4405. Appli-
cations will be 'due in the Grad Fel-
lowship Office not later than Feb. 23.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting
February 3, 1966
Approved: That SGC allocate $100 to
the Counseling Committee to be used
for a forum on venereal disease.
Approved: The Elections Committee
moves that the following dates be
established for the All-Campus Spring
Elections, Spring 1966.
February 21: 9 a.m. Registration
opens.
March 7: Petitioning closes.
March 8: 10:30 a.m. Candidates meet-
ing.
March 8: 12 noon. Campaign begins.
March 20: 5 p.m. Tentative expense

account.
March 22: 5 p.m. Final expense ac-
count.
March 22: 5 p.m. C & R meeting to
hear complaints (all complaints must
be in writing).
March 23: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Election Day
and booths will be open during this
time:
Approved: That SGC allocate $212 to
the Civil Rights Conference, to defray
the cost of airline tickets for two
speakers from Birmingham, Ala.
Approved: FACTS: President Johnson
has proposed to Congress that the Na-
tional Defense Act be eliminated in
favor of federal guarantees for private
loans.
In 1964-65 the University received
$980,000 in NDEA funds; 1965-66, $1.3
million and was hoping to receive $1.5
million in 1966-67.
In 1964-65 1,458 NDEA loans were
made, the average being $650 per stu-
dent.
The Michigan Higher Education Fund
which is similar to the President's pro-
posal but on the state level has proven
to be a relative failure for University
of Michigan students. Only $300,000
of the $1 million available to Michi-
gan students through this program has
been used.
Several area banks have been re-
luctant to grant government guaran-
teed loans.
Huron valley will not participate
in the state program because interests
payments on loans does not commence
until three or four years after it has
been made to a freshman or sophomore.
The Ann Arbor Bank and several De-
troit banks are reluctant to loan
money to out-of-state students, even
if it is guaranteed by the state gov-
ernment.
President Johnson's proposal would,
in effect, require students to apply
for loans through their local bank.
This would createnseveral difficulties
which do not present exist.
Freshmen or transfer students who
have not been on the Michigan cam-
pus previously would be having their
loan interviews with persons who might
not realize the cost o fa Michigan edu-
cation (Vis-a-vis housing, books, inci-
dentals, etc.) relative to costs at
other schools, while obtaining a loan
through the University enables the Uni-
versity to warn a student if his price
estimations are too low.
When a student with one or several
bans or other payments due graduates
from the University, he is permitted to
set up a payment schedule with the
finance office. If he is unable to re-
pay a loan because of heavy travel
expenses after graduation then he can
delay payments or at least reduce them.
Local banks may not prove to be as
flexible in their repayment schedules
as the University has allowed itself
to be.
PRINCIPLE: The basic purpose of a
public student loan program is to aid

as many students as possible, provided
that they show some level of need,
at the lowest price and highest con-
venience to each student as possible,
while at the same time preserving the
integrity of the loan.
MOVE: That the University of Mich-
igan Student Government Council af-
firms its confidence in the National
Defense Education Act which has per-
mitted both graduate and undergrad-
uate college students to obtain low
interest, long terms loans through
their local colleges and universities.
The elimination of the National De-
fense Education Act would be detri-
mental to a vast number of college
students throughout the nation.
Student Government Council urges
that the proposal before Congress to
eliminate the National Defense Edu-
cation Act in favor of federal guaran-
tees for private loans be defeated.
Student Government Council urges
that the precent forgiveness clauses
of thetNational Defense Education Act
be retained if a new program should
be implemented.
MOVE: That copies of the above mo-
tion and enclosed Fast and Principle
section be sent to President Johnson,
GovernorbRomney, Senators Hart and
McNamara, and Congressman Vivian,
Vice-President Cutler, Vice-President
Pierpont and Mr. Rae.
Approved: PRINCIPLE: The student
body should have a voice in choos-
ing the next president of the Univer-
sity. The significance of the office and
its importance to students and student
affairs should not be ignored. We be-
lieve this participation should be
throughout the selection process from
evaluating the University's needs and
interviewing potential candidtes to in-
clude student membership on the Pres-
idential Selection Advisory Committee.
The role of this committee would be to
recommend presidential candidates to
the Regents for their selection. In the
best interests of all parties, SOC urges
PH. 482-2056
MaweO. RPENER ROAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
_ NOW SHOWING

that Regents. faculty, alumni, and stu-
dents have equal representation on the
Nominating Committee.
MOVE: SGC request at the next Re-
gents meeting February 11, that
a) The Presidential Selection Advis-
ory Committee be formed by the Re-
gents as a body of 12-16 members.
b) That Regents, faculty, alumni and
students be equally represented on
this committee.
c) SGC will submit a list of poten-
tial student members to the Regents
who with the advice of Vice-President
Cutler, will make the final choice.
d) Presidential Selection Committee
will submit a final recommendation of
at least 10 candidates in preferential
order to the Regents.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Johns Hopkins Univ., School of Ad-
vanced International Studies - An-
nounces grad fellowships for special-
ized Western European studies at the
Bologna Center, Bologna, Italy. Also
fellowships for study in international
affairs at Wash., D.C.. leading to MA
and PhD degree. Requirements: de-
gree in econ., hist., poll, sci., pref.
plus 1 modern foreign language. Appli-
cation deadline March 1. Additional.
information at Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
Univ. of Penn., Wharton School, Phil-
adelphia, Pa.-Announces grad fellow-
ships in public finance & financial
admin. for students majoring in pub-
lic finance leading to Master of Gov-
ernmental Admin. Additional informa-
tion at Bureau of Appointments.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Booz, Allen & Hamilton, Inc., N.Y.C.

- Consultants for mgmt. consultant
firm covering all bus. functions in-
cluding prescribing & revising acctg,
systems, ets .financial controls. etc.
BS acctg., exper. in gen. & cost acctg.
& related.
Smith, Kline & French Labs.. Phila.,
Pa.-Attn.: Dec. & April grads: Ad-
min. Mgmt. Program. BA or MA in
Lib Arts or Bus. 2. Financial Mgmt,
Trainee. Degree in acctg. or finance. 3.
Advtg. & Promotion Writers. Degree
in Lib. Arts, Journ., Bus. Admin,, etc.
Also various openings for exper. in-
cluding Communications Supv., Mgmt.
Systems Analysts, Op. Res. Analyst,
Budget Acc't., International Mkt. As-
sistant, etc.
Wm. S. Merrell Co., Birmingham,
Mich. - Pharmaceutical Sales Repres.
to call on physicians, hospitals, etc.
Formal & on-the-job trng. Degree pref.,
not req. No exper. req. Various loca-
tions.
Flint General Hospital, Flint, Mich.
-Medical Records Librarian. Immed.
openings for woman. Regist. or eligi-
ble for regist, as med, rec. librarian'
to head department.
Chrysler Div., Highland Park, Mich.

-Graphic illustrators & designers for
corp. Opportunity for people with de-
gree & no exper., & no degree but ex-
per. Immed, openings for men & wom-
en.
Ella Sharp Mu seum, Jackson, Mich.
-Director. Immed. opening. Degree in
art-history, history, or rel. Exper. in
museum exhibit work, program & ad-
min. essential.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Harrah's Coning-Feb. 7. 8 & 9.
Reno & Lake Tahoe, Nev. Men &
women, you must be 21 and have birth
certif. to show. Interviewing for 11
positions. Excellent pay. Feb. 7, 3:30
p.m., Room 3511 SAB for orientation.
Interviews the 8th & 9th. Applications
available. Phone 764-7460 for- appoint-
ments.
Camp Nebagamon, Wis.-Boys. Will
interview Feb. 7 for counselors, sail-
ing, tennis & campcraft instructors.
Details at Summer Placement, Lower
Level, 212 SAB. 764-7460.

4

0

IQC-ASSEMBLY SHOW
BILL COSBY'
STANDING ROOM AVAILABLE
HILL AUDITORIUM, 7:00 P.M.
TONIGHT
$1.00

FEB. 16 & 17 Only at
The STATE THEATRE
6 PERFORMANCES ONLY!
TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
AN ACTUAL PERFORMANCE OF THE
NAIONAUTHEATRE OFGREAT BRITAIN
LAURENCE
OLEIVEER
0DTH ELLO
A BRE PRODUCTION
LS MARING
MAGGIE JOYCE FRANK
SMITH -'REDMANand FINLAY'
TBURGEANTHONY HAVELOCK-ALLAN ad
JOHN BRABOURNE
UEClNLOIr PANAVIIOF MMCH AIllER IW&
1:30 Show......... $1.50
4:30 Special Student
Show ..............$1'.00
8:00 Show..........$2.25
Purchase Tickets in Advance! Be
sure of a Seat!
TICKETS NOW ON SALE at the
Campus, Michigan & State Box-
offices.

I

I
-min"

At

In association with the American Playwrights Theatre
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Present
Robert Anderson's
THE DAYS BETWvvEEN
Last Performance Tonight
8:00 P.M.-Trueblopd Auditorium
Box Office open 12:30-8 P.M. curtain
TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE FOR:
CASSANDRA
by C. B. Gilford and Elizabeth Gibson
FEBRUARY 16-19
8:00 P.M. Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
PREMIERE PRODUCTION!

vW ."v rv f ... . '. i'r.Sfr'4r 'C Sx:"iVv :' ' '.. t
r ORGANIZATION NOTICES r
. rf$: v t :i~~~nti°.l C . .'° iv6

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Wahtenaw, Sun., Feb. 6, services at
9:45 and 11:15, Rev. Alfred T. Scheips,
speaker: "Jeremiah's Blueprint." Bible
Class at 9:45 and 11:15. All invited.
-* * *
Gamma Delta, International Luth-
eran student organization, supper at
6, program at 6:45: "Open Forum."
1511 Washtenaw. All invited.
Cercle Francals, Conference par .Guy
Capelle, "Les Francais sont-ils trahis
pary leur langue." Venez tou. Mardi, 'le
8 feurier, 8 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
* * *
UAC Symposium, "Conflict of Com-
pliment? Individualism and the Fed-
eral Government," Kenneth Keating,
8 p.m., Feb. 5, Rackham Aud.
* * *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Intermedi-
ate folk dancing, every Monday, 8:30-
10:30 p.m., Women's Athletic Bldg.
Newman Student Association; 1 p.m.,
Undergrad meeting. All undergrads in-
vited.e8 p.m., ice skating & tobogan-
ning. Meet at Center.
* * *
U. of M. Student Religious Liberals,
Sun., Feb. 6, 3-5 p.m. Ice skating par-
ty: University Ice Rink, food and dis-
cussion derby, Unitarian Church after
skating, (5:30 p.m.). Come to either
or both. Rides, side door of Union or
Mary Markely dorm 3:30 p.m.
* * o
Newman Student Association, Semi-
nar: "The Shape of the Universe and

Knowing It," Feb. 7, 7-8 p.m., 331
Thompson.
* * *
Guild House, "The Roose," Feb.- 7,
7-1:30 a.m., 802 Monroe. Sunday Sem-
inar, "The City: Opportunity and De-
liverance," Feb. 6, 7-8:15 p.m., 802
Monroe.
* * *
Alpha Phi Omega, Pledge meeting:
election of officers, Sun., Feb. 6, 4
p.m., 3511 SAB.
* * *
S.Q. Quadrants, Meeting, Sun., Feb.
6, 11 p.m.
Across1

PETITION NOW
for the
CINEMA GUILD BOARD
Sign up on the Cinema Guild office door,
2538 S.A.B. until February 12

ALSO-AT 9:00 ONLY
TheBattlei gI
Villa FkitaI
MED fiHARkR9SSAO BRktlIt
Wrien to the Screen and Directed by DELMER DAVES
TECNICOoR OPANAVWION* ROMWARNERORO&
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30

I

SHOWS AT
1:30-4:30-8:00 P.M.
Matinees-$1.25
Eves. & Sun.-$1.50
NOW EVERYONE CAN IEE
THE MOST LOVERLY
MOTION PICTURE OF ALL TIME Y

I

ROSALINDA-MARCH 16-19
PEER GYNT-APRIL 6-9

m

UAC's

I

t
o

Campus
SATURDAY, FEB. 5
1:30 p.m. - The African
dents' Union will present a

Cinema II

Stu-
sem-

Presents

inar on Africa at the Wesley
Foundation.
2:30 and 8 p.m.-The PTP will
present ACT in Moliere's "Tar-
tuffe" at L y d i a Mendelssohn
Theatre.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "School for Scoundrels" at
the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Robert Anderson's
"The Days Between" at Trueblood
Aud.

SIDNEY POITIER'S

Academy Award Winning Performance
LILIES OF
THE FIELD

1 11 T~ W

ENDING
WEDNESDAY

Friday & Saturday

Feb. 4, 5

" ' HIGHEST RATING!
SHEER FUN FROM BEGINNING TO END!"
-N.Y. Daily News
WOW
"MAGNIFICENT IN A VERY SPECIAL AND
VERY ENGAGING WAY!"-Life Magazine
k .3111 m V 19 t"

7 and 9:05 P.M.

i

Winner of 0
Academy Awards
including Best Picture.
AUDRV HEPBURN ' RISON

4

AUDITORIUM A, ANGELL HALL

Admission 50c

it

Dial 662-6264
c4LU

STARTS TODAY

SHOWN AT 1:00-3:00
5:00-7:00 & 9:05

S A WOOFALL FIW
A UNITED ARTISTS-LOPERT RELEASE

I

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TMiS PICTURE a RECOMMUENOE FOR AULTSO.Y
NEXT:: "THE LOVED ONE"

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TONIGHT AT 7and 9
I"
By Popular Request
[ "
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A"one-upmansh ip" del ight
starring
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Two nimble
young men who
juggle airline hostess
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and one pending0

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