100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1966 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1966

THE MICHIGAN .DAILY

PAGE Ft" r

TIJVRSDAY, JANUARY 6,1966 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE -

.,, ,.

Campuses

Act

for

reedoms

FANTASTIC REDUCTIONS
IN OUR YEAR-END

By WILLIAM E. JACKSON, JR.f
EDITOR'S NOTE: Mr. Jack-t
son is a doctoral candidate int
the Department of Public Law
and Government at Columbiax
University.
Academic freedom l1as once
again become a national issue.
The controversy surrounding thet
question has now reached thet
point of vaulting once obscure
professors to fame, and drawingI
in first hand involvement of suchl
off-campus personages as gov-
ernors, senators and ex-presiden-
tial candidates.
Freedom of speech on college
and university campuses has be-
come inescapably intertwined withl
the broader question of freedom
to dissent in, and ,against, our
society. For many the movement
is linked chiefly to specific prob-.
lems or grievances: Viet Nam,
civil rights, speaker rules. For1
others the movement becomes a
wide-sweeping vendetta against4
the general character of society-
the way it is run, the things it
values, those smaller members
whom it crushes.'
The most recent past has been
filled with the struggle to gain
legitimacy and sanction for the
right to express that dissatisfac-
tion and to hear "heresy" on the?
college campus.
In North Carolina, a "speaker-
ban" law was hurriedly pushed
through the state legislature in
the closing hours of the 1963
session. This unique lawprohibts
"any known member' of the Com-
munist Party, or anyone who has
invoked the fifth amendment's
protection against self incrimina-
tion in loyalty investigations, from
speaking on state-supported col-
lege and university campuses.
The proponents of the law were
motivated by diverse concerns,
ranging from anger over civil
rights demonstrations in the state
capital -participated in by some
U.N C. faculty and students, to
general popular unrest over the
"rrai" teaching at the state
. . . y, One of the chief back-
bahe law, State Senator
'7hite, has candidly com-
d: "I don't believe there's
<Huni=t . . . over there (at
t 701). but there might as
a was long as the people
think there is. They need to re-
a a, people along this line."
A special commission appointed
by Democratic Governor Dan
Moore has held public hearings
and is now considering proposals
to modify or repeal the law. Its
recommendations are due very
soon. The Southern Association of
Schools and Colleges has hinted
at withdrawing accreditation un-
less control is returned to the
trustees.
It should be noted that such
a law has been under considera-
tion in the state legislatures in at
least ten other states: Alabama,
California, Florida, Georgia, New
Hampshire, Pennsylvania, South
Carolina, Virginia, Wisconsin, and
Maryland. The heavy hand of
such a law (or ruling to the
same effect) is felt in its admin-
istration. Narrow minded college
and university administrators,
worried about maintaining good
relations with state legislatures,
can virtually control the flow of
speakers from the outside.
This danger is illustrated by
Ohio State's "gag rule" and modi-

fications thereof, which in effect
denied access to the campus to
any speaker not acceptable to
the conservative administration.
A kind of administrative tyranny
prevailed under which the Presi-
dent of Ohio State, Novice Faw-
cett, banned from campus anyone
distasteful to a faction of the
trustees led by former U.S. Sena-
tor John W. Bricker.
However, a student protest
movement led by the Free Speech
Front and Students for Liberal
Action last year successfully
fought the rule. In August, the
trustees voted a change which
gave final authority to invite
speakers to recognized student
groups and faculty advisers, with
no limitation on who may speak.
A rebuttal can be prescribed by
the faculty council.
But the years of struggle at
U.N.C. and Ohio State have taken
their toll in loss of faculty, both
incumbent and prospective. The
sense of alienation caused by an
atmosphere that stifles freedom
is currently portrayed by Prof.
Eric Solomon, formerly of Ohio
State, in "The Atlantic," Novem-
ber, 1965. Some three hundred
faculty members at the University
of North Carolina have signed a
document saying they will seek
posts elsewhere if accreditation
is lost.

The most heartening recent de-
velopment for those fighting for
academic freedom was the failure
of the Republican candidate for
governor in New Jersey, State
Senator Wayne Dumont, to defeat
Governor Richard J. Hughes in
the November 2nd election.
Dumont's main issue was his
attack on Hughes for failure to
demand the dismissal of a Viet
Cong sympathizer, Prof. Genovese,
on the faculty of Rutgers State
University. Governor Hughes made
it clear that he disagreed strongly
with the views of Genovese, but
that he also believed in freedom
of speech and a university free of
political interference.
Recently a subcommittee of the
United States Senate projected
itself into the controversy on
academic freedom. The Senate
Internal Security subcommittee
staff, by direction of Democratic
Senator Thomas J. Dodd (D-
Conn), published a report design-
ed to show that the Viet Nam
protest movement had been taken
over by "Communists and ex-
tremist elements."
Professors at several colleges
and universities were unfavorably
identified with teach ins. Many
closely involved sources feel the
'report contained much misleading
and false information, especially
in regard to the University of

Colorado. The report inferred
Communist influence at Colorado.
Senator Dodd expressed "regret"
in a letter to the presideit of the
university, but added: "I do feel
that there is a situation on your
campus which calls for attention."
Many feel that what is at stake
in these battles is the raison d'etre
of colleges and universities, what
Dean David Truman of Columbia
College has called "an unembar-
rassed intensity about matters of
the intellect, a hierarchy of re-
spect . . . for competence and
imagination, an attachment to
the fragile values of civilization."
To assert these "fragile values,"

academic protestors would claim,
is not to deny the obligation of
the colleges and universities in
this country to provide responsible
leadership. Rather, it is to re-
affirm this obligation. Perhaps
the campuses of the nation feel
they must constantly warn against
the "misguided" search for a static
security. Their purpose lies in the
words of Justice Douglas: "The
fact is that security can only be
achieved through constant change
. . . There is only an illusion of
safety in a Maginot Line. Social
forces like armies can sweep
around a fixed position and make
it untenable."I

SHOE

SALE

You still can find loads of great values in a wide choice of
styles, colors and sizes ... and now they're reduced even
further. Check your wardrobe and match up those favorite

outfits with our famous name shoes. Hurry Now!
JACQUELINE
regular to 1499 DRESS SHOES . . .

964

VARIED FIELDS:
IFaculty Members Get
Large Research Grants

regular to 1099 CONNIE DRESS SHOES

764

994
regular to 8 SPORTS.FLATS .5

A large number of research
grants were awarded to Univer-
sity faculty members recently.
Some of these are as follows:
A total of $45,979 was awarded
by the new Phoenix research or-
ganization to 15 faculty members
for studies concerning the peace-

, a t r
3 V o .3 /
4 kcN "T
..t. 41's5, d r ,r
,C( grE r d

ful uses and implications of nu-
clear energy.
The National Science Founda-
tion awarded the University
$102,600 to finance research in
civil engineering by Prof. Victor
L. Streeter and in nuclear en-
gineering by Prof. Frederick G.
Hammitt.
The foundation also granted
$144,600 for research in mathe-
matics and chemistry. $33,000 was
allocated as additional funds for
Prof. Roger C. Lyndon's project
on "algebra and logic," and Prof.
Lawrence S. Bartell received $81,-
000 for a chemistry project.
The U.S. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare has grant-
ed the University $17,718 for a
research project under the direc-
tion of Gerald D. Abrams, assis-
tant professor of pathology.
High-recognition awards total-
ling $76,385 were given to three
University faculty members by the
HEW department.
Also from the HEW department
came a $41,544 grant to Prof.
Theodore N. Newcomb for a re-
search study on "Student Values
and Peer Group Membership," and
a $37,559 grant to Prof. Nicholas
Rashevsky for a project in mathe-
matical biology.
II

ALL SNO BOOTS
20%, OFF'
FAMED NAME BRANDS
U.S. ESKILOOS & JOYCE

ALL SALES FINAL

OPEN 9 A.M.

306 S. STATE

+ Use Da~ly Cicass ifieds. +

Whatever Your
Photographic Needs
May Be--- WAe Can

noa Shop

Serve You. I

FLY IN TN44E

SOUP

II"

a

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

Ann Arbor's
only Exclusive Camera Shop
AUTHORIZED DEALER
for most nationally advertised
Merchandise.

PROMPT
PHOTO

FINISHING
CAMERAS REPAIRED
iour own repair shop

I

M MEDICINE
DENTISTRY
NURSING
PUBLIC
HEALTH

Our store

is specially

Our Merchandise Includes:

equipped to f'i your every
need, and a well informed
staff, including MEDICAL
and DENTAL students
wil"l serve you.

BOLEX " GRAFLEX
LEICA " MAMIYA
MINOLTA * ARGUS
POLAROID * KODAK
" PENTAX * ROLLEIFLEX
N AND BROWSE

F

PENTAX SPOTMATIC

STOP

I

over the most complete stock of
CAMERAS and CAMERA ACCESSORIES

,?!

mill -

Eu.. U I®IIImAWA Ii mi i® i

E

A l

1 I1.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan