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February 04, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-04

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, T FBRUTARY 4: 1966

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i'i41.V Fii 1'itil111.'A111 Yr 1Jf}p

u

LOAN PROGRAM:
LBJ Proposal Will
Aid More Students

SUI3SCRI1JE
TO THE
MICHIGAN DAILY

"Nom o /neff)(711(' hl()the
HI/bet , I"II me)IN."' jollm 14:16
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium

The Jazz Band performing in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, in one of the many central plaza concerts given
on its 1965 Latin American tour.
Famous Pieces TO Be Played At
Tong'sJazz Baud Concert

Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON-Conversion of
the government's student loan
program from federal to private
financing as proposed in the Pres-
ident's budgetmessage will make
about 90 per cent of the nation's
college and university students
eligible for assistance, an Office of
Education official said.
During the fiscal year which
ended last June 30, the number of
borrowers under the National De-
fense Education Act was about
319,000. In his message, President
Johnson predicted that the num-
ber of borrowers would rise to
775,000 n the fiscal year beginning
next July 1.
Peter M. Muirhead, associate
commissioner of education, pre-
dicted that the total would "rise
dramatically" in the years ahead
under the impetus of the new stu-
dent loan program.
No Longer Restricted
He explained that loans would
no longer be restricted to students
from the poorest families but
would become available to those
from families with incomes as
high as $15,000 a year.
"This takes in a good proportion
of the middle-income families in
the country," Muirhead said. "Ap-
proximately 90 per cent of the
students in institutions of higher
learning today come from families
with incomes of $15,000 a year or
less."
Guarantees
President Johnson has proposed
new legislation that would abolish
direct federal loans to college stu-
dents and establish instead a
system of government guarantees
to banks and other private in-
stitutions that make such educa-
tion loans.
In addition, the government
would pay a subsidy to the lenders
in order to maintain a 3 per cent

interest rate for the student bor-
rowers. Normal bank interest rates
on such loans at the current time
range from 6 to 8 per cent.
The loans would run as much as
ten years, with repayment de-
ferred until the student had com-
pleted his studies. Part of the
principal would not have to be
repaid by those who become
teachers.
An insured student loan pro-
gram was made a feature of the
Higher Education Act of 1965
which cleared Congress late last
fall, but officials said few loans
have been made under that pro-
gram so f ar.
What the President now pro-
poses is a change in the Defense
Education Act of 1958 under
which virtually all of the out-
standing student loans have, been
made.
PH. 482-2056
Enfsson CARPENTERRUB
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
-NOW SHOWING---

FINAL PERFORMANCES!
SATURDAY 2:30 & 8:00 P.M.)

"0

PTP'

pejell t4

AN& .c.T.

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM

AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATRE

IN

By LINNEA HENDERICKSON
The University Jazz Band, un-
der the direction of Bruce Fisher,
166SM, will present its first con-
cert of the year at 8:30 tonight
in Hill Aud.
Prior to the concert, at 7:00,
will be a UAC-sponsored lecture
by Nat Hentoff, jazz critic for the
New Yorker, Downbeat and Play-
boy. The lecture. "The Fine Arts:
Scope Yet for ; Individualism," is
a part of the Symposium on the
Future of American Individualism.
The concert by the eighteen-
piece Jazz Band will include works
made famous by the jazz bands of

Stan Kenton, Count Basie, Benny
Golson and Quincy Jones.
Highlights
Among the highlights of the
program will be"Count to Ten,"
a piece featuring trumpet soloists,
which was written by the famous
Detroit jazz musician, Ernie Wil-
kins; "Maria" from West Side
Story, which was among the most
popular pieces on last year's Latin
American tour; and the Second
Movement from a new Jazz Suite
by the band's pianist, Don Gillis.
"Most of what the band plays
is called special arrangements,
which means the arrangements
are either written especially for

Across Campus
A.,., AAA, A ,.. . &AA ,. . .. A A. AAA A A A . - ,. .AAA A A A A
FRIDAY, FEB. 4 of the Law School.
8 a.m.-The Bureau of Indus- 7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
trial Relations will present a sem- presents "The Golem" in the Ar-
mnar, "The Management of Man- chitecture Aud.
agters" in the Union. 7:30 p.m.-Mich, College Repub-
8:30 a.m.-The Bureau of In- lican Club presents "Promises to
dustrial Relations Workshop will Keep," a national conference on
present "Letter and Report Writ- civil rights; the keynote address
ing" in the Union. will be given by Gov. Romney; in
8:30 a.m.-The Bureau of In- the Lawyer's Club lounge.
dustrial Relations will present a 8 p.m.-The University Players
seminar, "Management by Objec- will present Robert Anderson's
tives--Results-Oriented Appraisals "The Days Between" at Trueblood
Systems" in the Union. Aud.
4:15 p.m.-A panel discussion on 8:30 p.m.-The University Jazz
"The Issue of Privacy in Psycho- Band will present a concert at
logical Testing and Research" will Hill Aud.
be held in Aud. B. Participants SATURDAY, FEB. 5
will be Prof. E. .Lowell Kelly of 1:30 p.m. - The African Stu-
the Psychology Department, Prof. dents' Union will present a sem-
Jesse Gordon of the social work inar on Africa at the Wesley
school and Prof. Samuel Estep Foundation.
EXACTLY ONE YEAR FROM ITS TELA, HONDURAS, CONCERT
}*
TONIGHT-JAZZ BAND
Hi 1-8:30-FREE
PRESENTED BY UAC AND THE MUSIC SCHOOL

the band or are acquired directly
from name bands such as Basie's
or Kenton's," Fisher says.
As the Band Plays.
When the band plays together
continuously as it did on the Latin
American tour, "It begins chang-
ing the music> and adding parts,
sometimes on the spur of the
moment, whirh adds to the unique
sound of the band," Fisher adds.
Thebandkmembers' crowded
schedules make it difficult for
them to find time to practice. Only
their love for playing enables
them to take the necessary time,
says Fisher.
A typical practice session may
run from 9:30 to 11:30 at night.
Although most of the band mem-
bers are music students who play
in the Symphony Band, there are
also students from the Medical
School, the business administra-
tion school, and the literary col-
lege.
Successful
The Latin American tour was
highly successful. The band was
warmly greeted at most stops on
the fourteen-country, fifteen-week
tour, although a concert had to
be cancelled because of a Com-
munist riot in Caracas, Venezuela,
and the stay in the Dominican
Republic was interrupted by the
revolution, which band members
watched from the roof of their
Santo Domingo hotel before being
rescued by the U.S. Navy.

ALSO--AT 9:00 ONLY
~The~,wt3 1
Vil orlita
MAUENe1ARAROSSANO BRAI
""e fr~m"&00 CM ctdby OEMERAS
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30

I

T ECTPICTURE
DIRECTOR
-New York film Cr/ltcs Award
- r
JOmf etvn

TODAY

"A madly whirling carnival of mirth!"
-Pittsburgh Press
"Shimmering and immensely
appealing display of style
. . thundering successy!"
--Pittsburgh Daily-Dispatch
"Stunningly recreated N.Y. hit!"
--Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
THE 1965 LINCOLN CENTER HIT!
In a New Version By Under the Direction of
RICHARD WILBUR Wz: WILLIAM BALL
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE-JAN. 25-FEB. 5
NO FRIDAY PERFORMANCE OF "TARTUFFE"
LATE SHOW TONIGHT!! Beckett's "ENDGAME" LATE SHOW TONIGHT!!
11 P.M. 11 P.M.

re-MIH G

SHOWS AT
1:30-4:30-8 P.M.
Mats. $1 .25; Eves. &Sun. $1.50

DIRECT FROM ITS PREMIERE SHOWINGS.SPECIAL EN6AGEMENT AT SPECIAL PRICES. NO RESERVED SEATS.
OIW EVERYONE CAN SEE THE MOST
LOVERLY MOTION PICTURE OF ALL TIME!

.a bold mof ion picture . .. made
by'adults. .with adults.., for adults
k~"Only OneC
New York" Cun " u w

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TTT'7'TlrlrlrTTTTTTTT'TTT"f"T"TTlr,964 4r.r.t.t.t..i.,il6g6 F"

THE CADETS AND MIDSHIPMEN
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Present
40th ANNUAL

"GOLD BARS
AND BRAID
MILITARY BALL
FEBRUARY 12, 9-12 P.M.... LEAGUE
MUSIC BY:
SYMPHONY IN SWING
KEN MAC KENZIE QUARTET
RATIONALS
All Military Personnel and Guests Invited

Y-Y..Y-Y-Y.i
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~UY~am:JAID
Winner of 0 Academy Awards including Best Picture.
SCO-SNG
AURYHEPBR REIAR ON 81ALEY HOLO\AY WILEfD HYDE-WHITE
CLADYS NCOOPER J£R[NYBRIM .PEQIAY BY - LfIIJ .ft (C'OSTUMES BY C BEIiU IL }UI H IRMES PAN NR tI VN h
BASEEANPOAYTHE RI.AY " ED DIRECTEY AA&A ''"V',/ k' it
Bos10tYCS Sy, MUSIC Y SCREENPLA I.LERERA l- - FRDERICKODUCED. Jj l [.Y(1~L I R ECED BylV~I
I AJAI.P~P f[1~EIC( J~VVJTECHNICOLOR' SUPER PANAVISION 7O FROM WARNER BROS.

MM M*19

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ENDING TODAY
"DO NOT DISTURB"

~1

I

_. , .:

STARTS SATURDAY

UAC's
MUSKET '66
presents

o s

I

I

Cinema I

I

WEST
SIDE

S O

Presents

SIDNEY POITIER'S

Academy Award Winning Performance
LILIES OF
THE FIELD

I

STORY
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
February 9-10-11-12
Because "WEST SIDE STORY". has no overture, ticket holders
MUST be seated at curtain time. Once the dance prologue has

*0

All Qk W.il-' i

I

,

W' i !

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